Would you bother?

Silver fan 82

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I'm planning a session on a slow moving river / drain on Monday.
The forecast for the weekend is rain.
Would you bother fishing rivers after a few days of rain or stick to stillwater?
I've not alot of experience on flowing water so any advice is welcome.
 

rudd

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It may move a tad faster!
Just consider what a drain is. Its there to carry excess water, hence why some rise and drop quickly.
 

Silver fan 82

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It may move a tad faster!
Just consider what a drain is. Its there to carry excess water, hence why some rise and drop quickly.
These were my thoughts mate. Was also thinking that the extra water may get the fish feeding?
 

Neil ofthe nene

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If it is a controlled drain then a lot will depend on whether the EA feel the need to run water off quickly. Also is it straight or are there meanders, bends and obstructions that can cause slack water or back eddies? These are always worth trying in flood conditions as fish can move out of the main current.

One thing to remember is that the water at the bottom of the river will be moving a lot slower than that you see on the surface. The average flow occurs at 0.7 of the water's depth. Below that point the water flows at least half as fast as the surface. So fish may be hugging the bottom making heavier floats, bulk shot/olivettes & flat floats the order of the day.
 

Silver fan 82

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If it is a controlled drain then a lot will depend on whether the EA feel the need to run water off quickly. Also is it straight or are there meanders, bends and obstructions that can cause slack water or back eddies? These are always worth trying in flood conditions as fish can move out of the main current.

One thing to remember is that the water at the bottom of the river will be moving a lot slower than that you see on the surface. The average flow occurs at 0.7 of the water's depth. Below that point the water flows at least half as fast as the surface. So fish may be hugging the bottom making heavier floats, bulk shot/olivettes & flat floats the order of the day.
Great advice thanks Neil! It's mainly straight but with some bends so will check them out.
 

davej

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With all the grass and vegetation at the moment, it will have to be a fair amount of rain to make any difference.
 

david white

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It’s all down to the individual venue and how it reacts under various conditions or there’s no over riding generalisation ( unfortunately ) until you get extremes is low clear water makes life difficult as does high levels with flood water ( although many barbel pegs produce under these conditions )
Therein lies the fascination of river venues every day is different and likely to be ‘ a school day ‘
 

Zerkalo

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A big thing for me when it's raining is the quality of the bank, on the Severn it can get slippy very quickly and so I don't go when it's raining. On the smaller river I fish, it is very spate and so it only takes a bit of rain and it will be up and down like a yoyo. I'd still go and check it out but as said it will depend on your river/drain.
 

Silver fan 82

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It’s all down to the individual venue and how it reacts under various conditions or there’s no over riding generalisation ( unfortunately ) until you get extremes is low clear water makes life difficult as does high levels with flood water ( although many barbel pegs produce under these conditions )
Therein lies the fascination of river venues every day is different and likely to be ‘ a school day ‘
Yeah it's a bit of a learning curve for me, being primarily a stillwater angler.
 

Maesknoll

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Go and have a look at it, if it looks in good nick and fishable, fish it, if it’s chocolate and a raging torrent, wave it goodbye and go to a lake.
 

Silverfisher

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With all the grass and vegetation at the moment, it will have to be a fair amount of rain to make any difference.
That is a very good point especially when it didn't rain much at all for 3-4 weeks before the season started so the ground could soak up a fair bit as well. It's rained more often than it hasn't since the 16th but our rivers are only marginally higher than they would normally be this time of year. That amount of rain come mid Autumn would have them well up if not over. That said the 6 consecutive days of rain that's started today might have a bigger impact 😬
 

JayD

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When rivers rise, I like to fish down the edge. I've found that often shoals will split, and spread out along the banks where the current is usually a little slower and more even. It's usually a roving session, where I drop a bait in any likely looking spot, which can be anything from a small slack, to a longer straight with even flow. It's surprising how little water the fish can be in, often it's less that a foot deep. A worm, piece of bread, cheese, meat, or even a bunch of maggots, either under a float, laid on, or inched through, or even a link leger, using swan shot so I can adjust the weight needed. It's a method that can spring a few surprises, and I've had anything from dace to barbel wandering down the river spending 10 or 15 minutes in each spot.

John.
 

Silver fan 82

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When rivers rise, I like to fish down the edge. I've found that often shoals will split, and spread out along the banks where the current is usually a little slower and more even. It's usually a roving session, where I drop a bait in any likely looking spot, which can be anything from a small slack, to a longer straight with even flow. It's surprising how little water the fish can be in, often it's less that a foot deep. A worm, piece of bread, cheese, meat, or even a bunch of maggots, either under a float, laid on, or inched through, or even a link leger, using swan shot so I can adjust the weight needed. It's a method that can spring a few surprises, and I've had anything from dace to barbel wandering down the river spending 10 or 15 minutes in each spot.

John.
Love roving small rivers, really enjoyable way of fishing.
 
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