Would anyone mind explaining poles to me?

MartinWY

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Hi gents,

Further to my earlier thread about a cheap poles breaking which you may have seen, I'm trying to decide if I want to replace mine or not but I need a little more info first. My lads replacement will be different due to his age and a very kind forum member has stepped in to help with that :love:.

I've read around a bit on the subject of poles, but many of the tackle reviews these days are just full of superlatives and have little substance, almost like advertorials.

All I know about poles and so on is that they tend to go to about 16m in length, are typically used in matches and that whips are traditionally solid tip and for fishing to hand for small fish. Thats about it.

Could someone explain the differences between poles, margin poles, whips, top kit's (I presume that means top 3 sections?) and so on? For example, can top 3 or top 5 kits be used on their own or just as replacements for broken sections?

I love to fish the waggler on a rod, so I think I'd only really ever use a pole at fairly close range on still waters, say inside 10m. I don't have any rollers or pole specific tackle other than rigs I made up for the elasticated whips but they will work on pole I believe?

Is a margin pole what I might be looking for perhaps? I need something that will handle the odd errant carp (to about 20lb) which are present in all waters I fish, but I don't wish to target carp.

What am I looking at spending and is there a particular pole I should be considering? Budget isn't an issue but I don't want to go too mad either (so no Browning Spheres at the price of a small korean car, ideally).

Any info appreciated very much.

Thanks
 

chefster

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Hi gents,

Further to my earlier thread about a cheap poles breaking which you may have seen, I'm trying to decide if I want to replace mine or not but I need a little more info first. My lads replacement will be different due to his age and a very kind forum member has stepped in to help with that :love:.

I've read around a bit on the subject of poles, but many of the tackle reviews these days are just full of superlatives and have little substance, almost like advertorials.

All I know about poles and so on is that they tend to go to about 16m in length, are typically used in matches and that whips are traditionally solid tip and for fishing to hand for small fish. Thats about it.

Could someone explain the differences between poles, margin poles, whips, top kit's (I presume that means top 3 sections?) and so on? For example, can top 3 or top 5 kits be used on their own or just as replacements for broken sections?

I love to fish the waggler on a rod, so I think I'd only really ever use a pole at fairly close range on still waters, say inside 10m. I don't have any rollers or pole specific tackle other than rigs I made up for the elasticated whips but they will work on pole I believe?

Is a margin pole what I might be looking for perhaps? I need something that will handle the odd errant carp (to about 20lb) which are present in all waters I fish, but I don't wish to target carp.

What am I looking at spending and is there a particular pole I should be considering? Budget isn't an issue but I don't want to go too mad either (so no Browning Spheres at the price of a small korean car, ideally).

Any info appreciated very much.

Thanks
Look at @Neilofthenene beginners guide to pole fishing , goes into details of the different types of pole , as for buying a new pole, it’s a minefield for beginners, you’ll get hundreds of recommendations, best to go to a tackle shop and have a look at some[/USER]
 

MartinWY

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Look at @Neilofthenene beginners guide to pole fishing , goes into details of the different types of pole , as for buying a new pole, it’s a minefield for beginners, you’ll get hundreds of recommendations, best to go to a tackle shop and have a look at some[/USER]

I will. Neil showed me the article on floats and i read that plus others, but didn't notice the older posts. Cheers
 

robert d

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Hi gents,

Further to my earlier thread about a cheap poles breaking which you may have seen, I'm trying to decide if I want to replace mine or not but I need a little more info first. My lads replacement will be different due to his age and a very kind forum member has stepped in to help with that :love:.

I've read around a bit on the subject of poles, but many of the tackle reviews these days are just full of superlatives and have little substance, almost like advertorials.

All I know about poles and so on is that they tend to go to about 16m in length, are typically used in matches and that whips are traditionally solid tip and for fishing to hand for small fish. Thats about it.

Could someone explain the differences between poles, margin poles, whips, top kit's (I presume that means top 3 sections?) and so on? For example, can top 3 or top 5 kits be used on their own or just as replacements for broken sections?

I love to fish the waggler on a rod, so I think I'd only really ever use a pole at fairly close range on still waters, say inside 10m. I don't have any rollers or pole specific tackle other than rigs I made up for the elasticated whips but they will work on pole I believe?

Is a margin pole what I might be looking for perhaps? I need something that will handle the odd errant carp (to about 20lb) which are present in all waters I fish, but I don't wish to target carp.

What am I looking at spending and is there a particular pole I should be considering? Budget isn't an issue but I don't want to go too mad either (so no Browning Spheres at the price of a small korean car, ideally).

Any info appreciated very much.

Thanks
As Chefster has said take alook at Neils posts on poles . If you want a brilliant margin pole then i can vouch for tri cast margin poles ,absolutely outstanding margin poles . I dont think you will find a bad review of their margin poles . There are many good poles out there from many manufacturers upto and past 16m but for margin work i dont think you can better tri cast
 

MartinWY

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I'm going through Neils site now. Lot of info, I'll have to read it several times. Neils articles suggest a shorter pole for starting out which makes complete sense.

On the bobco site earlier, I picked out these examples but not sure of the real differences between them, other than price. Is it literally a weight thing?




Tricast Trilogy 2 Power Margin Pole (seems to be £320 for a 9m but out of stock)

The compatibility of the browning seemed like a good idea, but perhaps thats the case for all of them.

Dave, if I'm not allowed to post links I apologise, wasn't sure.
 

robert d

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I'm going through Neils site now. Lot of info, I'll have to read it several times. Neils articles suggest a shorter pole for starting out which makes complete sense.

On the bobco site earlier, I picked out these examples but not sure of the real differences between them, other than price. Is it literally a weight thing?




Tricast Trilogy 2 Power Margin Pole (seems to be £320 for a 9m but out of stock)

The compatibility of the browning seemed like a good idea, but perhaps thats the case for all of them.

Dave, if I'm not allowed to post links I apologise, wasn't sure.
The tri cast margins are top dogs , the browning margin is also excellent ,not far behind the tri cast in my honest opinoin. I havent used any of the others
 

chefster

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They are all highly recommend poles, from top manufacturers, which give good after sales services, spares readily available, and all quality products
 

MartinWY

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The tri cast margins are top dogs , the browning margin is also excellent ,not far behind the tri cast in my honest opinoin. I havent used any of the others

Robert is that the one you've used, because I see another one called "excellence" which seems to be new as its preorder only, but then again that could mean anything at the moment what with covid.

 

robert d

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The tri cast margins are top dogs , the browning margin is also excellent ,not far behind the tri cast in my honest opinoin. I havent used any of the others
The new tri cast margin can go to 13m with extensions i believe. The tri cast excellence ultra power margin ,10 m is about £469 you can get extensions to 13.4m
 

Neil ofthe nene

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First and foremost there are very few poles that are made with the intention of catching 20lb carp regularly. I doubt many people would target that size fish using a pole.

I have said elsewhere that to me a whip is a short "pole" unelasticated using a flick tip to hand. and not intended for larger fish (over 1lb). Today a pole will be a take apart "rod" that utilises an internal elastic system in the top two or three sections. As such it can be fished at any length from just the topkit to full length be that 10, 13 or 16 metres or more.

Poles made specifically to target large fish in the margins will be stronger and thus heavier than a standard "long" pole. The longer the pole the more flexibility you have to cushion large fish. The shock of hooking and trying to stop the initial run of a large fish at close range can be too much for a standard pole. Hence tougher "margin poles" have been developed.

A topkit is just the top two or three sections of a pole be it margin or otherwise. This will be the part that is elasticated using either a conical bung in the end or through a side puller aperture. In most poles the topkit mounts onto the No.4 section. A "match " topkit will normally consist of three sections, a "power" kit will be two. The match kit is designed for lighter elastics and thus the No.1 section (the thinnest) allows you to mount a bush on the tip with a narrow bore. A power kit designed for stronger, thicker elastics has no need for a thin No.1 section. Both will be similar lengths but the taper will be different ending in a narrower or wider hole in the end. It is the less severe taper that gives the power kit its strength.

The beauty of a pole is that it can be fished at any length. I have fished holding the topkit halfway along its length as well as fishing at a full 16m and anywhere in between. I have tape on some sections to help me fish at precisely the distance I need to in order to be spot on a particular point in my swim. You do not have to hold the pole just at the end of the last section added.

It is a mistake to think that a pole is just a match angler's tool. Like any rod in your bag it is a tool that does a job. If it is the right tool for the day then you use it, if not you use something else.

There are plenty of strong "margin" poles that will give you a chance with 20lb carp. But the problem comes when you are not targeting these fish. Basically it is not possible to fish a pole in a way that will give you a good day on silvers and also let you land 20lb carp. I have never had a 20lb fish on any kind of tackle. If I were targeting silvers with the risk of hooking a large fish I would opt to fish a light rig and let the carp break the hooklength. Or I would gear up for the carp and accept that I am going to lose a few small silvers.

Sticking to rod and line would give you a chance of landing the odd large carp as long as you are prepared to be patient and there is the room to let the carp run. Whatever way you do it I would have two landing nets set up.
 

robert d

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Robert is that the one you've used, because I see another one called "excellence" which seems to be new as its preorder only, but then again that could mean anything at the moment what with covid.

I have the tri cast xrs2k4 , i did have the browning margin to .
 

MartinWY

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First and foremost there are very few poles that are made with the intention of catching 20lb carp regularly. I doubt many people would target that size fish using a pole.

I have said elsewhere that to me a whip is a short "pole" unelasticated using a flick tip to hand. and not intended for larger fish (over 1lb). Today a pole will be a take apart "rod" that utilises an internal elastic system in the top two or three sections. As such it can be fished at any length from just the topkit to full length be that 10, 13 or 16 metres or more.

Poles made specifically to target large fish in the margins will be stronger and thus heavier than a standard "long" pole. The longer the pole the more flexibility you have to cushion large fish. The shock of hooking and trying to stop the initial run of a large fish at close range can be too much for a standard pole. Hence tougher "margin poles" have been developed.

A topkit is just the top two or three sections of a pole be it margin or otherwise. This will be the part that is elasticated using either a conical bung in the end or through a side puller aperture. In most poles the topkit mounts onto the No.4 section. A "match " topkit will normally consist of three sections, a "power" kit will be two. The match kit is designed for lighter elastics and thus the No.1 section (the thinnest) allows you to mount a bush on the tip with a narrow bore. A power kit designed for stronger, thicker elastics has no need for a thin No.1 section. Both will be similar lengths but the taper will be different ending in a narrower or wider hole in the end. It is the less severe taper that gives the power kit its strength.

The beauty of a pole is that it can be fished at any length. I have fished holding the topkit halfway along its length as well as fishing at a full 16m and anywhere in between. I have tape on some sections to help me fish at precisely the distance I need to in order to be spot on a particular point in my swim. You do not have to hold the pole just at the end of the last section added.

It is a mistake to think that a pole is just a match angler's tool. Like any rod in your bag it is a tool that does a job. If it is the right tool for the day then you use it, if not you use something else.

There are plenty of strong "margin" poles that will give you a chance with 20lb carp. But the problem comes when you are not targeting these fish. Basically it is not possible to fish a pole in a way that will give you a good day on silvers and also let you land 20lb carp. I have never had a 20lb fish on any kind of tackle. If I were targeting silvers with the risk of hooking a large fish I would opt to fish a light rig and let the carp break the hooklength. Or I would gear up for the carp and accept that I am going to lose a few small silvers.

Sticking to rod and line would give you a chance of landing the odd large carp as long as you are prepared to be patient and there is the room to let the carp run. Whatever way you do it I would have two landing nets set up.

Insightful Neil, thank you. I'm on your blog now reading away.

You mention a side puller and end bung type arrangement. How do you know which one a pole has when buying as they dont mention it as far as I've seen?

I guess an end bung can be used in any pole, but a side puller would have to be built in, or wouldnt it?
 

robert d

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I have the tri cast xrs2k4 , i did have the browning margin to .
There is a site called polecompare , worth a look although not right upto date it will give you a very good idea about different poles . The best manufacturers for speedy spares are tri cast and daiwa but some other good ones to , i had a quick spare number 4 from browning which was a surprise
 

robert d

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First and foremost there are very few poles that are made with the intention of catching 20lb carp regularly. I doubt many people would target that size fish using a pole.

I have said elsewhere that to me a whip is a short "pole" unelasticated using a flick tip to hand. and not intended for larger fish (over 1lb). Today a pole will be a take apart "rod" that utilises an internal elastic system in the top two or three sections. As such it can be fished at any length from just the topkit to full length be that 10, 13 or 16 metres or more.

Poles made specifically to target large fish in the margins will be stronger and thus heavier than a standard "long" pole. The longer the pole the more flexibility you have to cushion large fish. The shock of hooking and trying to stop the initial run of a large fish at close range can be too much for a standard pole. Hence tougher "margin poles" have been developed.

A topkit is just the top two or three sections of a pole be it margin or otherwise. This will be the part that is elasticated using either a conical bung in the end or through a side puller aperture. In most poles the topkit mounts onto the No.4 section. A "match " topkit will normally consist of three sections, a "power" kit will be two. The match kit is designed for lighter elastics and thus the No.1 section (the thinnest) allows you to mount a bush on the tip with a narrow bore. A power kit designed for stronger, thicker elastics has no need for a thin No.1 section. Both will be similar lengths but the taper will be different ending in a narrower or wider hole in the end. It is the less severe taper that gives the power kit its strength.

The beauty of a pole is that it can be fished at any length. I have fished holding the topkit halfway along its length as well as fishing at a full 16m and anywhere in between. I have tape on some sections to help me fish at precisely the distance I need to in order to be spot on a particular point in my swim. You do not have to hold the pole just at the end of the last section added.

It is a mistake to think that a pole is just a match angler's tool. Like any rod in your bag it is a tool that does a job. If it is the right tool for the day then you use it, if not you use something else.

There are plenty of strong "margin" poles that will give you a chance with 20lb carp. But the problem comes when you are not targeting these fish. Basically it is not possible to fish a pole in a way that will give you a good day on silvers and also let you land 20lb carp. I have never had a 20lb fish on any kind of tackle. If I were targeting silvers with the risk of hooking a large fish I would opt to fish a light rig and let the carp break the hooklength. Or I would gear up for the carp and accept that I am going to lose a few small silvers.

Sticking to rod and line would give you a chance of landing the odd large carp as long as you are prepared to be patient and there is the room to let the carp run. Whatever way you do it I would have two landing nets set up.
The tri cast will handle almost anything in the right hands , but Neil is right if there were lots of 20lb fish a rod would be better . You need to get the ballance right ,right size elastic ,right size line ,right size and strong hook for those lumps .
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Normally the tech spec of a pole will tell you if the topkits are made to accommodate side pullers. Today I would expect side puller slots to be the norm. Seller will inform you if you ask.

It is possible to add a side puller slot to any topkit. It would need strengthening with a carbon wrap and a hole drilled. I have done it when cutting universal topkits down to fit a pole by adding part of the offcut as a sleeve and epoxied in position before drilling through the double thickness.
 

MartinWY

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The tri cast will handle almost anything in the right hands , but Neil is right if there were lots of 20lb fish a rod would be better . You need to get the ballance right ,right size elastic ,right size line ,right size and strong hook for those lumps .

Yes its literally just in case. I highly doubt what happened with the el'cheapo poles would happen with these, not with a 3lb bottom on, which is how I almost always fish on float, if not lighter.
 

robert d

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Yes its literally just in case. I highly doubt what happened with the el'cheapo poles would happen with these, not with a 3lb bottom on, which is how I almost always fish on float, if not lighter.
If you want to land the 20lb ers i would have at least a 10lb hook length and a 20 plus elastic set loose so it just returns in the pole but will power up quickly. The tri cast will handle it ,just take your time dont be in a rush and keep your pole low to the water even in the water and if its swimming away do not try to use any puller ,wait until it stops swimming away then start using the side or puller bung when you have got the pole back to the top kit . Be as smooth as possible and take a spare pair of under crackers just incase you hook into the beast lol
 
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