Worms not looking too healthy

Zerkalo

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Got a kilo of Dendras in the sack they came in from Willy Worms for my holiday. They're not as lively as I'd like.

Have took them out of the sack and put them in three 3 pint bait tubs. Fed them some fruit cuttings, damp cardboard, and worm food powder from my wormery, sprayed the soil to keep them slightly damp.

Got to keep them for a week on a caravan holiday in this weather... any ideas for how to keep them healthy?

Have heard if you find a dead one to take it out as it kills the rest of them?
 

Zerkalo

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Cheers mate. I'll see what I can do with the mashed potato. Keeping them cool is going to be tricky. I'm going to store them under the caravan, putting them in the cool box for a couple of hours at a time if it gets way too hot, bit worried about the 3.5 hour journey there, could be enough time to cook them. Last year I put them in a cool box overnight and it froze them, they went all stringy and I was bit gutted but ending up bagging up on them! It gets proper warm in the awning sometimes, reminds me when my parents cook a breakfast in there and I can hardly breathe lol
 

Zerkalo

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You want to see the amount of maize I've put on my two pints of red maggots. 😁 They are only for tipping off the worms on the hook but not taking any chances.
 

Simon R

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Dendrobenas will tolerate quite a wide range of temperatures - provided they're given time to acclimatise

Want to kill them quickly?
Bung 'em straight in the fridge after they've been out in the hot sun all day.

Personally I'd put the three bait tubs in the coolbox with an icepack, take one out when you arrive, leave the rest inside it and put it somewhere cool - under the van is usually the best. Then just leave alone until you need some more - the icepack will defrost but coolboxes are insulated so the temperature will only rise slowly - hopefully not too much that the worms expire.

My local worm farm (Bilsdale Worms - Dendrobaena Worms for Fishing and Composting ) recommends:
Dendrobaenas can be kept for weeks in the bag provided if placed on a concrete floor where there are no large fluctuations in temperature. A little mashed potato, melon skins or meal can be introduced after 2 to 3 weeks. The peat should be kept moist – you should just be able to obtain a few drops of moisture if you squeeze the peat very tightly.
Simon
 

OldTaff

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If you have a fishmongers nearby your home ask them for one or two of the expanded polystyrene boxes they have wet fish delivered in - they are a world better than bog standard cooler boxes.

At home in the garage I have two containing water that I float bait boxes in containing maggots and casters during summer months. I put the lids on but with spacers I made to give about a 1cm all round air gap and the water stays cool allowing me to keep maggots and casters a couple of weeks even in high summer.

Will be doing the same for my worms later in the year when I get some or possibly just part filling a container with compost and letting the worms roam in there directly.
 

Zerkalo

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Thanks @Simon R and @OldTaff. It's a bit late for me to change my cool box which isn't very good to be fair. I'll bear in mind the change of temperature. Problem was last year is that they were kept right next to the ice block we have to use in the old electric cool box. It froze them... I tried to pass it off as a tip that Bream like half dead worms, it seemed to work better than live ones which attracted more Roach, but I'd rather fresh lively worms if I had the choice.
 

JayD

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Whenever I've needed to keep worms for a length of time, I've simply put them in container or two, ie large Tupperware type things with air holes in lid, and put a layer of damp newspaper, a layer of worms, and repeat, for 4 or 5 layers, an occasional spray of water to keep them damp. Keep in the coolest place you can, and if it gets too warm, then place them in a larger container with an inch or so of water, the evaporating water will help keep them cool, like putting a wet cloth around a bottle of water in hot weather.
I remember doing this to keep a couple of hundred lobs healthy for a two week holiday in Scotland during one of the hottest spring bank holidays I can remember.

John
 

Simon R

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Ahh the electric coolbox - we had one but it ended up in the skip - it was rubbish as a standard coolbox and when plugged into the cigarette lighter in the car it either froze or cooked everything inside. :oops:

Simon
 

Zerkalo

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Mines just not very cold - so needs ice blocks that freeze everything in the adjacent area. :LOL: Layers of newspaper sounds like a good trick, cheers. (y)
 

OldTaff

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Had best part of half a kilo of worms left over from a tench session a couple of months ago - grabbed some 15l plastic tubs with lids (from work :rolleyes:) drilled one with a shed load of 1.5mm holes for ventilation and drainage. Perforated container sits inside unblemished tub with a little upturned plant pot stopping them sticking together. It all lives in the garage so not a massive swing in temperature.

There seem to be as many worms in there now as there were when I started but I do occasionally take a few out tench fishing so maybe they are breeding in there 🤷‍♂️

The worms are still super happy in there on a diet of damp newspaper, melon slices, mashed potato and a few grass clippings. The juice out of the bottom has been going into our garden borders via watering can diluted about 1:10 and I don’t think we’ve ever had such fantastic growth.
 

JayD

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Whenever I've needed to keep worms for a length of time, I've simply put them in container or two, ie large Tupperware type things with air holes in lid, and put a layer of damp newspaper, a layer of worms, and repeat, for 4 or 5 layers, an occasional spray of water to keep them damp. Keep in the coolest place you can, and if it gets too warm, then place them in a larger container with an inch or so of water, the evaporating water will help keep them cool, like putting a wet cloth around a bottle of water in hot weather.
I remember doing this to keep a couple of hundred lobs healthy for a two week holiday in Scotland during one of the hottest spring bank holidays I can remember.

John
Just reread this and thought I'd clear the highlighted bit up. The 'them' refers the Tupperware containers, not the worms! 🙂

John
 

Total

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Just reread this and thought I'd clear the highlighted bit up. The 'them' refers the Tupperware containers, not the worms! 🙂

John
The best kept worms in the business....:)(y).....And then you take them to catch all them lovely carp Jay!:p;):ROFLMAO:
 

Nicky Dodds

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Those worms were raised on powdered layers pellets and the occasional sprinkle of water. They probably won't be alive long enough to benefit from fruit scraps. Even mashed potato wouldn't be in for long enough. They are kept in bags because they provide all round ventilation rather than just a ventilated top in a container. They require that ventilation and to be kept in the best shade you can find.
 

JayD

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The best kept worms in the business....:)(y).....And then you take them to catch all them lovely carp Jay!:p;):ROFLMAO:
Lovely carp? aint that what they call an oxymoron Mark?😜 :whistle:

The worms that holiday, were lovingly prepared to try and catch wild brown trout from some small Scottish streams I'd got permission to fish. Only problem was the driest Spring bank for years, and in parts I could just about wade across in sandals and not get my feet wet! I walked several miles of bank with only two bites and two lost fish. I ended up fishing them 'sink and draw' in a small loch for a few suicidal rainbows. What worms were left, were brought home, still wriggling, and used on my next match for some 'proper' fish, ie chub and barbel on the Nidd.

John.
 

Zerkalo

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Love a good lobworm, they are like snakes the ones I buy, bigger than I can find... good when even the 'snakes' don't get smashed by small fish at 25p a worm or a lot of leg work.
 
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