wiels disease

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scouse

'River Man'
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Hi Lads
doe.s anybody know a barrier cream
for it, it.s just one of the lads i fish with caught it
fishing if you can help thanks
dave (scouse)
 

Dave

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Hi Dave,

I'm not sure about the barrier cream but here is some more info about it:

The national rat population is increasing and between 50% and 60% of rats carry and excrete the organism Leptospira ictero-haemorrhagiae in their urine. Infection of humans with this organism causes an illness, Leptospirosis (commonly called Weil's disease) which has been known to result in death in 10% of cases.

The organism enters the body through breaks in the skin such as cuts, blisters and abrasions, or via the lining of the nose, throat or alimentary tract. The incubation period is 7-13 days and the disease starts with a fever, muscular aches and pains, loss of appetite and vomiting with prostration. Subsequent bruising of the skin, sore eyes, nose bleeds and jaundice may occur. The fever lasts about five days and may be followed by significant deterioration. It is vital that the doctor be told that the patient may have been in contact with a source of infection. The symptoms can easily be mistaken for those of flu and, if the patient has a clean occupation, the possibility of Weil's disease may be overlooked in the early stages. Laboratory testing of blood will confirm the diagnosis but this may take undue time in an ordinary hospital lab.

Treatment is usually by Penicillin Antibiotic

Cavers, along with water sports enthusiasts have been known to contract the disease. Some of these have suffered a mild dose which was not diagnosed at the time, but which has been detected in subsequent blood tests. Any skin wound or blister, old or new, may be infected if immersed in water polluted by the organism. By the nature of their sport it is difficult for cavers to avoid cuts and abrasions on their hands, particularly when "digging". Wearing gloves probably provides the most effective protection since waterproof surgical plasters on their own are unlikely to stay in place. Clean, fresh water should be used to wash wounds as soon as possible.

The disease is curable if recognised in time, but many doctors in urban areas will never have encountered it. If you have any reason to suspect that you may have been infected, you may need to draw your doctor's attention to the possibility that the symptoms could be Weil's Disease

The incubation period is 7-13 days. Early Symptoms are: Fever Muscular aches and pains Loss of appetite Vomiting with prostration Later symptoms may include: Bruising of the skin Sore eyes Nose bleeds Jaundice. The fever lasts for about five days, and may be followed by significant deterioration.


Yikes, I suppose one of the best ways to combat/prevent/reduce the risk would be to make sure that you have your Penicillin jabs up to date. I'm not medically qualified tho' so a bit of advice from a GP wouldn't go amiss


Dave
 

esox.20

04/11/01 - 12/10/15
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As far as I know there is no preventitive procedure for this. The treatment is after the event. The main cause of rats by the waterside must be litter. So by clamping down on the idiots who persist in leaving it, will go a long way to helping reduce populations. Having litter bins scattered around the area is not the answer as these tend to be neglected and not emptied. John

chill out go fishing
 

Geoff P

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If you fish a water where rats are known to be, there is one simple rule. Do not put hands in or near mouth.
In Sussex 15 years ago a chap nearly died of Weils disease. He used to bite his line and also smoked a lot.
Always use clippers.
The disease is spread through rats urine in water getting on hands and then into mouth. I'm lucky I don't smoke now, and I never eat on the bank without first washing my hands in clean water


Geoff
If it swims, catch it.
 

Stu

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Alright Dave
I have asked this question to the wifes uncle who is a GP. There is nothing on the market that will completley block it out.Also there is no immunisation jab avaliable.I take a Pop bottle with clean water with me when i go fishing and try to rinse my hands as much as posible.e.g after mixing groundbait , or returning a fish in to the water. especially before i have a butty.

Stu
 

Geoff P

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quote:
Alright Dave
.I take a Pop bottle with clean water with me when i go fishing and try to rinse my hands as much as posible.e.g after mixing groundbait , or returning a fish in to the water. especially before i have a butty.

Stu

And I was told Yorkshire men had no common sense.

Good point Stu


Geoff
If it swims, catch it.
 

Larry

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Very god idea on water bottle i'll do that in future,IV'e not any trouble with animal rat's but have often had trouble with Human Rat's.

Cheer's Larry
 

scouse

'River Man'
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Hi dave
thanks for the reply,
i have printed it off and i will put it in our club house
thanks again for your reply, and stu thanks for the the tip about the pop bottle,
dave (scouse)
 

Rico

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There's no need to get too paranoid over this one,
just make sure that your spacesuit does'nt leak.
 

Ziptrev

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LOL Rico nice 1, I had begun to panic!
With all the damn kit I'm susceptible to buying, Where am I gonna find space for a water bottle!
And WATER!,
Do you all realise what fish DO in water?
Stick with Guinness
Welcome aboard Rico
 
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