Why the cage feeder is a winner for bream and roach

Zerkalo

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Steve Ringer article in the AT resonates with me after my holiday catching a few Bream. On the first day I started on an open end feeder in around 15' of water.

I mixed my groundbait too wet, there were even pellets stuck in the feeder when I wound in, no good at all and definitely not what I wanted for Bream, wanting a bed of bait for them to feed over. I switched to a cage feeder and it improved slightly but my groundbait was still too wet. I should have fixed it by adding more dry groundbait to the mix but foolishly hoped the sun would dry it out.

On the second and third days I fished a cage feeder with a dry groundbait mix so the feeder emptied as it fell through the water... not so much a 'cloud'... but at least the feeder emptied and I caught much better.

The last thing you want when Bream (and Roach) fishing is a feeder that does not empty at all... but this article also goes against the received wisdom that an open end feeder is always the no1 choice for deep water Bream fishing. I'd say getting the groundbait mix the right consistency is probably the most important.

But then again, there is the window feeder, not mentioned in the article and not something I personally use but also noted to be deadly on its occasion.

Thoughts?
 
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grey

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There was a time it wasn't unusual to set up a feeder and flog the water with the same feeder, same spot all day. I think that is the main aspect that has changed in recent times...

Chop, change, bit more weight, bigger/smaller feeder, add water to the mix to get more bait on the deck etc - there is more finesse to the delivery of the feed and thought applied to how the fish are reacting to the container it is delivered in, throughout the session.

Consistency of ground bait is important (and another element to tinker with), but for me, I believe the quantity of ground bait, the amount of feed and the pace everything is topped up is the secret to successful bream fishing. I consider the choice of container it is delivered in is more of an additional subtle use of knowledge, to potentially gain extra fish.
 

Zerkalo

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I'd agree with that too. I have said before that I think Bream fishing can be quite simple, but you still have to get the feed right. I'm most confident with putting 4mm pellets through the feeder these days, which is probably another reason the cage works a bit better for me than the open end... 20 years ago when open ends were the go to the bait might have been different, chopped worm etc
 

grey

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Patience and confidence in what your doing is my best advice for bream. When they do turn up, take it steady, you have to let them build confidence before you can attempt to build big weights.

Bream anglers often spend the majority of their session nurturing a swim before being able to enjoy fully exploiting it! :D
 

Zerkalo

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I've found that when I'm on fish and catching I get a lot of fizzing from my peg, lots of small bubbles, always presumed that is fish digging around for my pellets but could be wrong.
 

grey

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Could be your bait working or other fish, skimmers and tench might cause a bit of fizz, but bream (certainly the shoals of bigger bream) tend to boil and cloud the water so are easily spotted even at distance.

It's a slightly different story on smaller commercials, but in larger waters, if you spot a shoal in a certain place at a certain time, there is every chance you will find them there same time, same place the following day - they are creatures of habit that patrol in shoals to a routine.

Knowing that, the angler's aim is not so much to draw bream in, but to stop them in their tracks and keep them interested in front of you for as long as possible.
 

Pyffy

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Good article from Steve Ringer there. I haven't fished the feeder specifically for bream for quite a while. When my dad was still with us, he and I used to go over to Ireland (Carrick on Shannon) every June to have a go at the bream shoals on the Shannon and lakes whilst they were still shoaled up after spawning. Usual method was a to pre-bait a swim the night before and then attack them in the morning with large cage feeders to start and then drop down to a medium once more bait had been added. We used plain brown crumb by the sack full adding VDE Brasem to sweeten it and then sweetcorn, casters and maggot in the feed. Getting the right consistency of the ground bait was my job and hand mixing 5-10 kg of ground bait every morning and night for each of us had me looking like Popeye by the end of the week, oh how I would have wished for a groundbait whisk ;). For pre-baiting we needed a firmer mix that would get down to the bottom in swims up to 20ft deep using the trusty whooper dropper catapult, where as the ground bait for the cage feeders was always on the dryish fluffy side so that it exploded out of the feeder as it fell through the water, but not so dry that it emptied too quickly. Oh to be back on the bank with him now. Anyways, these days the groundbaits on sale at the tackle shops are limitless but as you say Zerkalo its the mix that's most important and what freebies your adding.
 

Peter

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From my point of view Hybrid/Method feeders work on the principle of a small concentrated area of bait attracting fish which home in on it, whereas a cage feeder produces more of a carpet of feed over a wider area. Bream for me are shoal fish that tend to graze for their food, therefore baiting an area the size of a dining table is more suited as a shoal can graze over it and hold them and that's where cage feeders come into their own.
 

Total

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From my point of view Hybrid/Method feeders work on the principle of a small concentrated area of bait attracting fish which home in on it, whereas a cage feeder produces more of a carpet of feed over a wider area. Bream for me are shoal fish that tend to graze for their food, therefore baiting an area the size of a dining table is more suited as a shoal can graze over it and hold them and that's where cage feeders come into their own.
The various amounts of water and compression of said feed carriers also influence the size of the feed area as does water depth and weather conditions, tow etc....;)(y)
 
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