Which Shimano match reel for trotting?

grey

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I don’t see the problem.

as I said in the second post of this thread Shimano used to make spools that fitted various different ‘sized’ reels.
You're right, there shouldn't be a problem, but as it currently stands, spools are now part of the design of the reel as a whole, and, if you are to believe Shimano, each spool's drag is tailored to the reel it fits.

Shimano believe the best drag system is essential to their range of reels, apparently they have so much faith in their drag system that they are able to eliminate the reverse (anti reverse) feature.

If the spool is now so vital a feature to the reel, then the only way I see to get the compatibility and convenience we used to have, is to put a line sleeve with absolutely no working parts on the spool. Or as the song goes, "a spool within a spool, a reel within a reel"...
 

trotter2

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this is the shallow spool. I've not seen a plastic deep spool, only in alloy, and they obviously deeper than your pic (I still can't get my head around how the deep ones could be used. I did try and load one up with some heavier line for some barbel float fishing on the Wye, and it was unusable with the bedding in).
The way around it is to fill the metal deep spools with car body filler place the spool on a lathe and turn out a shallow spool. I have done this with mine works well.
 

grey

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Did Mitchell not try something similar to this idea with their quartz series of reels? That range did not sell well given that they were actually not a bad reel.
The UK coarse market might be the 5th largest coarse market in Europe but in the global reel market it is still a small market.
Also given the increase in popularity of carrying rods ready made up and stored in this state the market for spare spools is decreasing as people tend to buy more reels and never take them off rods so have no need to change spools. I now rarely change spools on reels to the point of never carry them with me they are all stored in a drawer in my shed. The only reels I do sometimes change spools on is on closed face reels

Yes, as I said previously - Mitchell did use the idea and I also said why it failed for them.

The UK isn't the 5th largest market, it accounts for a fifth of all European coarse sales. It is the largest coarse market in the world, it's also a hotbed of new ideas and innovations in coarse fishing. The UK coarse market is considerable enough for all manufacturers to make products specifically for - even the global marketing lead companies such as Shimano.

I understand that some anglers like yourself use only one reel for one line, but then the issue of spare spools isn't one that affects them. I expect most anglers would like a couple of reels the same size but with a cheaper choice of loading them with several different weights of line to extend the versatility of their reels, allowing the option of choosing the most appropriate line (rather than the nearest they have on either of their spools).
 

adriang

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The way around it is to fill the metal deep spools with car body filler place the spool on a lathe and turn out a shallow spool. I have done this with mine works well.
if only I had a lathe... Unfortunately its the string and electrical tape approach for me.
 

Rick123

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I asked Dave Harrell the same question some time ago. He told me for all his river trotting (when not trotting too far) he used a 2500 Daiwa TDR. Just out of interest for you? I'd suggest you also think about the size of the spool. The Mitchel Match I'm currently using seems about right, and I don't get the line behind behind the spool like on all my Shimano and Cadence reels. I'd opt for a Daiwa or Okuma fixed spool reel. JMO.
 

Rick123

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Also mention some of the older Shimano reels have shallow spools? Around £50 on E-Bay?
 

Arch

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I have 5 old Shimano supermatch REs and 3 5010 baitrunners, that i use for all my running line fishing. All the spools interchange, I have 17 of them with various lines on them. Most of them are the shallow version. I just pick a spool for the venue i'm fishing and put it on a reel. It works for me.
 

adriang

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I have 5 old Shimano supermatch REs and 3 5010 baitrunners, that i use for all my running line fishing. All the spools interchange, I have 17 of them with various lines on them. Most of them are the shallow version. I just pick a spool for the venue i'm fishing and put it on a reel. It works for me.
 

trotter2

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I got rid of my TDR because the line was going behind the spool read a few people saying the same thing about them. When I use a Shimano exage never had the problem. The older model TDR did not do it either. Don't forget Rick ,Dave works for daiwa.
 

Lucky Strike

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I got rid of my TDR because the line was going behind the spool read a few people saying the same thing about them. When I use a Shimano exage never had the problem. The older model TDR did not do it either. Don't forget Rick ,Dave works for daiwa.
The Exage is a great reel. I have recently bought the older Exage 3000 MRA in my quest for the perfect trotting reel. It comes close but the spools are not particularly shallow. I’ve also got a Shimano super X match 3000m which may be the holy grail. I saw Terry Lampard trotting with one so if it’s good enough for Lampard it’s good enough for me.
 

Lucky Strike

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I asked Dave Harrell the same question some time ago. He told me for all his river trotting (when not trotting too far) he used a 2500 Daiwa TDR. Just out of interest for you? I'd suggest you also think about the size of the spool. The Mitchel Match I'm currently using seems about right, and I don't get the line behind behind the spool like on all my Shimano and Cadence reels. I'd opt for a Daiwa or Okuma fixed spool reel. JMO.
[/QUOTE
The Mitchell match has the perfect weight and depth of spool. The big problem is that the bail can only be engaged by turning the handle which surely makes it useless for trotting?
 

Rick123

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We will always have our own favourites and its almost pointless trying to change peoples minds? The two reels I favour are both old now, the Shimano Aero Match XT7 4000 111. And the aero perfection 3010 XT7. All I will say is both have a wonderful line lay (like the old Mitchel Match) and it come off and goes on sweetly, its all I want for a trotting reel. Both have OK clutches 7/10 maybe, small handles and quick enough retrieve, all I like in a reel for one discipline. JMO.
 

Rick123

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I find peoples love of centre-pins fascinating. I was brought up on pins 60s, the first reels I ever used were Rapidex and used them for years. I could cast decent with them too. However for me they are a quick running river reel, and on slower rivers don't work as well for me. I cannot see the point on still waters at all, when a fixed spool is quicker and simpler, but its JMO. It seems we all have our little ways/fads call it what you like, but we cannot see why others don't agree or like what we like, it's funny. I think now I try and use the most functional gear I can get, easy for me to use. Never thought I'd like a pole but hay, Neil convinced me, didn't take that much really. I think people like pins for several reasons, one, people mention it when they see a pin. Its "oh I've a pin at home but never use it, must get it out sometime." Or "oh! never see people using pin nowadays," and it freaks them out a little? Others like the struggle to get competent with them, and it does require some work. I don't use mine anymore despite having two nice models, I just find them too much hard work these days.
 

alsur

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The Drennan FD3000 and Greys GS30 we’re close to the ideal reel trotting reel. Did other manufacturers produce reels like this with ultra shallow spools yet with better engineering?
I agree I've still got a couple which I use regularly just wish they were smoother
 

Sam Vimes

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I find peoples love of centre-pins fascinating. I was brought up on pins 60s, the first reels I ever used were Rapidex and used them for years. I could cast decent with them too. However for me they are a quick running river reel, and on slower rivers don't work as well for me. I cannot see the point on still waters at all, when a fixed spool is quicker and simpler, but its JMO. It seems we all have our little ways/fads call it what you like, but we cannot see why others don't agree or like what we like, it's funny. I think now I try and use the most functional gear I can get, easy for me to use. Never thought I'd like a pole but hay, Neil convinced me, didn't take that much really. I think people like pins for several reasons, one, people mention it when they see a pin. Its "oh I've a pin at home but never use it, must get it out sometime." Or "oh! never see people using pin nowadays," and it freaks them out a little? Others like the struggle to get competent with them, and it does require some work. I don't use mine anymore despite having two nice models, I just find them too much hard work these days.
I didn't use pins as a kid. I'm not on a nostalgia trip. I put pins on modern carbon rods, not cane or fibreglass. I'm no "traditionalist", whatever they might be. I'm also not much of a centrepin evangelist, I don't wish to persuade anyone else to use them. However, I tend to float fish fast rivers and that's where I use them. Very occasionally, I'll occasionally use them on a stillwater, or rarely for legering, but when I do it's largely just to catch a certain type of fish just to say I have caught one on a pin (it was decent tench this summer. It took me one session). I use them for no other reason than I enjoy using them. After a false start where I gave up on them, I've also enjoyed learning how to get the best out of them and how to overcome their limitations. Once you do that, they become a lot less limiting than many suggest. All that came after many years of seeing absolutely no point in centrepins at all.
 
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