What diameter line do you use most of?

baggy

Mark Saunders
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Most of my pole rigs are made up on 0.14, 0.12 & 0.10. Hooklengths tend to be 0.09 & 0.08.

If fishing rod and line it is the lightest I can get away with
 

Zerkalo

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When fishing rod and line, how far above your mainline would people go with a hooklength?

You can get away with a stronger breaking strain of pre-stretched line compared to most reel lines but by how much?

I get snagged a lot on the rivers I fish and I've found on the small river, if I fish 0.16 to 6lb reel line, 9 times out of 10 the hooklength will go first, but if I step up to 0.18 the 6lb mainline will go first losing the whole rig in the process. Maybe I should step up to 8lb mainline if I want to use 0.18 pre-stretched hooklengths.

Hope that makes sense. The only situation where I fished 0.18 to 6lb mainline was a helicopter rig for Tench as I wanted a stiff hooklength.
 

mike fox

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I would never use a pre-stretched hook length on a river for 2 reasons. Lack of abrasion resistance against snags and the other because, not only are you fighting the lunges of a fish but also against the current as well, so the extra stretch helps absorb any sudden erratic movements from the fish and debris coming down in the flow.
 

Zerkalo

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That was the reasoning behind going to 4lb Maxima hooklengths for a while. But from reading some of the replies, it seems like people do use pre stretched lines. @dave brittain 1 says he uses 'Power Line'. That sounds prestretched to me. But my choice of 0.16 on the small river I fish was also condemned so it got me wondering, people must be using 8lb reel line if they're fishing with 0.18 hooklengths unless that's unstretched line?

I think some of the confusion might be when I say weir, I mean on a small river, not a big powerful river.
 

mike fox

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I think it does depend on the river. The rivers I have fished since living in Stockport have been fast flowing and very snaggy from debris and rocks and would not make sense to use pre-stretched lines. On the slower less snaggy rivers anglers could get away with a pre-stretched line. You must remember, there are NO hard and fast rules in angling because every situation is different to the other. It really is down to the anglers preference. Weigh the situation up that you have in front of you at the time bearing in mind depth, snaggyness, speed and turbidity of the flow and species you are after. One rule/suggestion will never fit all circumstances.
 

Zerkalo

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Yes I think that is especially true when it comes to fishing rivers as no two rivers are the same, often changing on a day to day basis as well, they are some of the hardest venues to advise on I think, as well as tackle choice being a personal thing. The way I fish the Severn is very different to how I fish the weir I fish for example.
 

RMNDIL

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How different we all are ! I've used so called 'pre-stretched' lines for hooklengths for over 30 years on rivers/canals/lakes (everywhere) since Double Strength first came out (1987 I think). And have never had a problem with them no matter if catching hundreds of small fish or singular large fish like chub, barbel or carp (even 'pest' trout). So long as I choose the correct diameter for the job it's all fine. Abrasion resistance is, generally speaking, pro-rata to diameter anyway. The thicker the line, the more of it there is to stand up to abrasion when compared to thinner lines.
 

Zerkalo

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It's a personal choice. That I'm told conflicting things by almost everyone I speak to should attest to that.

This is me for hooklengths on the Severn next season anyway. Hopefully the suppleness will make up for the diameter. I can always change it if I feel it's not working. Not heard of anyone else using this line. 😁


2021-01-22 14.47.46.jpg
 

RMNDIL

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Exactly that. Different opinions due to different experiences. 0.30mm nylon should be as tough as old boots for you.
 

Zerkalo

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It's tough but I can still pull for a break on a snag with it and will go before 12lb Sensor. When I first started using it I thought, how hard am I going to have to pull if I get snagged up? Turns out it's not that bad.
 

dave brittain 1

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I use low diameter hook length for most of my fishing and don't have any problems, however the manufacturers stated breaking strains vary that much, like a number of match anglers I work on diameter.

The way line is manufactured gives it it's characteristics.

Standard mono, Maxima, Bayer, Drennan float fish etc all have good stretch, abrasion resistance, suppleness and moderate tensile strength.

Most low diameter lines often referred to as pre stretched have higher tensile strength, less stretch, less abrasion resistance and less durability however they can be quite limp which can have it's benefits.

Fluorocarbon is a line that divides a lot of anglers. It's stiff and sinks quickly, doesn't stretch, has good abrasion resistance and varies in diameter from the same as low diameter line to the same diameter as standard mono.

If like many match anglers you've tried a number of lines, trying to gain an edge you'll quickly discover that where durability is required such as catching big weights of carp on the waggler or feeder a good durable standard mono is hard to beat, however some of the newer co-polymers which have the best characteristics of standard mono and low dia line, lines Daiwa Tournament ST and Shimano Technium can be very good and a perfect compromise.

With low diameter lines I've seen 0.16 dia vary from 4lbs to 8lbs in breaking strain, however if you get 1/2 dozen low diameter 0.16 lines they will all break at around the same breaking strain. What sets some apart from others is that some have moderate or what the manufacturers would refer to as controlled stretch. On every occasion I would opt for the line with a little shock absorption even if it has a lower breaking strain because I know that under typical fishing conditions that element of shock absorption can make all the difference between being cracked off and landing a fish.

Fluoro carbon hasn't caught on as well in match fishing as it has in trout angling. Personally I have no faith in it despite product testing it. I find it too brittle and unreliable for match fishing applications. It's best use if for trout fishing due to it's stiffness to hep turn over a leader or for getting a fly down to the bottom quick. The claims about it's refraction and ability to not be seen under water aren't quite correct. If you view it from underneath with the sun above it shines like a beacon so don't always believe what you read.

My advice if if you are going to use breaking strain as a guide make sure you know the characteristics of the line you are using for a given application.

It's also beneficial to use a micrometer or vernier to check your line diameter because in many cases they are under or over stated which for those using the stated BS of the line as written on the spool asks many question because if the stated diameter on the spool states its 0.16 and the line actually measures 0.14 the the line will break well below the stated breaking strain hence why some anglers like myself stick to diameters.
 

Zerkalo

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Great post again @dave brittain 1 and confirms some things I have thought.

First time I went Barbel fishing I bought some pretied Preston PR36 to 8lb which would have been on prestretched line, presumably tied to Reflo. And I had 11 Barbel no problem, so maybe there is something to using a low diameter line for how many bites you get...

Stroft GTM is now my go to pre-stretched line having switched from Reflo Power Line. Not because I had a problem with Reflo but I find Stroft very up to the job, but I wouldn't personally use it for Barbel fishing on the Severn at the moment.

I have similar thoughts about Flourocarbon, I've noticed it is used by a lot of people, but for me I couldn't get on with how it knotted.

I'm not detailed enough to mic up lines, so the test for me is a simple one, if when I'm snagged... does it break before or after the mainline. That gives me a guide to breaking strains. Of course if it's the feeder that's snagged that's a different issue but when people talk about using 0.18 for Chub on the feeder, it makes me wonder what breaking strain they are talking about and what reel line they match it with.

This Korum Barbel line I am using is what I'd describe as moderate stretch, so much so that I was surprised it was seemingly repackaged from what was initially marketed as a hooklength line into a reel line.
 

mike fox

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If you view it from underneath with the sun above it shines like a beacon.
Which in my experience is a common reason anglers fail to catch. Bright sunny days in clear water during the winter when you think scaling down in line diameter is the way to go but forgetting to take the shine out of the line.
 

dave brittain 1

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Zerkalo

My standard set up for the Wye on a Barbel Peg with a little water, (2-3ft), in is 10lb Maxima main line to 0.24 low diameter line which has a stated breaking strain of 14lbs. It's not fishing light but what people struggle to understand is that the stated 14lb low diameter line will break before the 0.28 dia 10 lb maxima every time when you pull for a break due to being snagged.

It's knowing and understanding how your tackle will behave when you test it to it's limit.
 

Zerkalo

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I think the Wye and Severn are very similar rivers! Not fished the Wye myself but would love to. It seems like a good test for me.

This is why I say on the Worcs Stour, a very small weir I fish, when I use 6lb mainline, when I go up to 0.18 hooklengths, the mainline will break first, not what I want so that's my reason for using 0.16 however light it seems when Barbel are around. I don't think the small river Barbel, for whatever reason, have the same power as a Severn Barbel, but after reading your posts I'm considering respooling with 8lb Reel line for the Worcs Stour as my reel needs doing soon anyway.
 

RMNDIL

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Fluorocarbon does stretch. At least all of those i've ever used have and do. I use it for hooklengths all of the time no matter if 0.07mm or 0.18mm (which for my use is mega heavy !). Even lines like Double Strength stretch something like 25%. Lowest stretch (and stiffest) line I've ever played with was PET and it sank like a stone as well (not as heavy as fluorocarbon though ). Just too stiff to use on a reel. Just not manageable.
 

buygoodtackle

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I have to admit for the last 12 years all my reels have been loaded with pre-stretched line, granted different types for feeder compared to float as the lines have different properties as previously mentioned. Never had a problem and would not use a "reel" line again. Down to confidence again I suppose as many would not condone the approach that works for me.
 

Zerkalo

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Just bought a spool of Guru Pulse Pro in 6lb for my Bream feeder fishing reel, if it's not prestretched, they do a very good job with the diameter and low stretch properties.
 

mike fox

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I have to admit for the last 12 years all my reels have been loaded with pre-stretched line, granted different types for feeder compared to float as the lines have different properties as previously mentioned. Never had a problem and would not use a "reel" line again. Down to confidence again I suppose as many would not condone the approach that works for me.
The only times I have ever used a pre-stretched line on the reel was when I fished the Rother in West Sussex for Grayling and Chub trotting Maggot. It was Silstar Match. It worked very well and never had break offs using the Daiwa Harrier match rod. I cannot see the point in using pre-stretched line while feeder fishing hard on the deck. I always used a lower diameter of the mono reel line as a hook length.
 

buygoodtackle

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Just as a comparison the 0.20mm line I use for heavy feeder work is 5.6kg (12.32lb) while the closest to 6lb would be the 0.14mm which is 2.9kg (6.32lb). I would tend to have 0.18mm on my main feeder reels and 0.12mm or 0.14mm on my river float reels, pellet waggler reels has the 0.20mm.
 
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