We have had the best what is the worst

Dave Spence

MD virtual champion 2020. Golden Pie winner 2018.
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That's the point, it looked like something only a Numpty would have used. Not something an intelligent and image conscious suave sophisticate like you would.
Do you want me to forward a link to spec savers Neil?😜
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
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Luminous floats, i bought one but never went night fishing. :LOL::ROFLMAO:
Leave them under a light all day and you could see them for 20 seconds, if it was pitch black.
What do you think these were for? I made my own waggler floats with an insert that you could put the tube over to hold them. Last 6 to 8 hours depending on what size you got.

1617838130628.png
 

Markywhizz

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I can’t understand why so many anglers have to slag off other anglers who enjoy fishing a different way to them. Or slag off venues they wouldn’t choose to fish themselves. However you choose to fish there will be plenty of people who derive an equal amount of pleasure fishing another way. With the antis growing in numbers it’s important to have as many anglers of all persuasions as possible.
 

62tucker

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Well said.
I was at a man made fishery at weekend. It was heaving. And a lot of expensive tackle on show.
I bet so called carp puddles have the most expensive equipment used of all fishing types.
 

chris1967

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Carp puddles and litter... litter is a bane and I'd happily shoot the perpetrators in the face.... and carp puddles are made by greedy people who rely on an anglers ever increasing need to catch bigger weights and win more money... hate em both
come on calm down, bring it in lets have a group hug
 

rudd

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After reading, dismantling and digesting all the posts so far I have concluded the worst angling item ever invented has to be:

The internet.

Keyboard warriors (myself included), instant success angling (I saw it on u tube types), bad advice, good advice not listened to, sniping away at others ways/gear/methods/thinking etc etc.

The internet has taken away the need for individual thinking, new anglers watching guru/korda (many other brands available) videos then thinking thats how it has to be done, theres no other way - its taken away the learning for your self curve.
 

Zerkalo

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I said trollies but I was being a bit of a wally trolly. That's why I put a disclaimer. Some people need them, I have in some situations, but it might make for fairer matches if there was a limit of tackle people could take, doubt many will agree with that, especially the match men. :LOL:
 

JayD

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No long pieces of wood/bamboo with line attached to the end then? Like never in the history of mankind was that ever a thing?
Did I say, or infer that?
A tongue in cheek comment, meant in a light hearted way, answering your question. Mentioning some things used to catch fish prior to the use of even a 'pole', never mind rod and reel, and still in common usage around the world to this day.

John.
 

JayD

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And primitive poles (tree branches) with horse tail hair or braided silk for line, bone for hooks.

The term angling derived from using a hook to catch fish.

"to fish with a hook," mid-15c., from Old English angel (n.) "angle, hook, fish-hook," related to anga "hook," from Proto-Germanic *angul-, from PIE *ankulo-, suffixed form of root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (see angle (n.)). Compare Old English angul, Old Norse öngull, Old High German angul, German Angel "fishhook." Figurative sense "catch or elicit by artful wiles" is recorded from 1580s.

Hook goes on the end of a line, line goes on the end of a pole, or it did in the 15c.
Thanks for that Neil.
After reading many of your posts, and getting the feeling that you like to make some of your own gear, I thought you might be interested in this article I bookmarked a few years ago.
It's a modern translation from Dame Juliana Berners 'Treatise on fishing with an angle', which predates Issac Waltons 'Complete Angler' By about 150 years, and is regarded by some as the inspiration for his book. Some less complementary comments even accuse him of plagiarism to some extent.
Unfortunately none of the illustrations in the original book are included.

Here I shall teach you how to make your rod skillfully.

You shall cut, between Michaelmas and Candlemas (September and February), a fair staff a fathom and a half long (9 feet) and as thick as your arm, of hazel, willow, or ash. Heat it in a hot oven and straighten it. Then let it cool and dry for a month. Then bind it tightly with a "cockshoot cord" (the cord used in making cockshoots or nets to catch birds), and bind it to a form or to a good straight tree. Then take a plumber's wire, even and straight and sharp at one end. Heat the sharp end in a charcoal fire until it is white-hot. Then burn through the staff with it, always keeping straight in the pithe, making a hole at each end until they meet. Then burn the lower end with a little spit for roasting birds, and with other spits each bigger than the last, and the biggest last of all so that you make your hole tapering.
Then let it lie still to cool for two days.

Unbind the cockshoot cord and let the staff dry in the smoke of the house roof until it is dry through and through.

In the same season take a fair yard of green hazel and heat it to make it even and straight, and let it dry with the staff. When they are both dry, fit the yard into the hole in the staff, until it is halfway up.
Then, to finish the other half, which will be the crop, take a fair shoot of blackthorn, crab-tree, medlar, or juniper, cut in the same season and well dried and straightened ; and bind both crop and staff neatly, so that the crop enters accurately into the hole in the staff.

Then shave your staff until it tapers to the top.

Then put at each end of your staff a ferrule of iron or laton (an alloy something between brass and pewter) in the neatest way, with a spike in the lower end fastened with a split pin, so that you may take the crop in and out. Then set the crop a hand's breadth within the upper end of the staff, in such a way that the crop is as big there as in any place above. Then bind the crop with a line of six hairs down to the binding on the staff, tying the binding fast at the top with a loop to fasten the fishing line.
Thus you will have a rod so secret that you may go walking with it and no one will know its purpose. It will be light and handy to fish with whenever you desire; and to make it easier here is a figure as an example.


After you have thus made your rod you must learn to color your horsehair lines in this manner: From the tail of a white horse take hair, the longest and finest you can find; and the rounder it is, the better. Divide it into six parts, so that you may color each part a different color. The colors are yellow, green, brown, tawny, russet and dusk color.
To make your hair a good green color do this: Take a quart of small ale and put it in a little pan, and put in it half a pound of alum. Put your hair in, and let it boil gently for half an hour. Then take out your hair and let it dry. Then take a pottle (about a half gallon) of water and put it in a pan, and put in two handfuls of weld (greenweed or dyer's weed, Reseda luteola), and press it with a tilestone, and let it boil gently for half an hour. When the scum is yellow put in your hair with half a pound of copperas beaten to powder, and let it boil "halfe a myle waye" (the time it takes to walk half a mile, about 10 minutes). Set it down to cool for five or six hours. Then take out the hair and dry it.

It is then the finest green there is for the water. The more copperas you use the better, or you may use verdigris instead.
In another way you may make a brighter green, thus: Steep your hair in a wood cask the color of light lead, and then put it in old weld as I have said before, except that you do not add either copperas or verdigris.

To make your hair yellow dress it with alum as I have said before, and afterwards with weld, without copperas or verdigris.

To make another yellow: Take a pottle of small ale, and press three handfuls of walnut leaves and put them in. Put in your hair until the color is as deep as you want it.
To make russet hair: Take a pint of strong lye and half a pound of soot and a little juice of walnut leaves and a quart (or a quarter of a pound?) of alum, and put them all together and boil them well. When it is cold put in your hair, until it is as dark as you wish to have it.

To make a brown color: Take a pound of soot and a quart of ale, and steep in it as many walnut leaves as you can. When they turn black take it off the fire. Put in it your hair, and let it lie until it is as brown as you wish.

To make another brown: Take strong ale and soot and mix them together. Put in your hair for two days and two nights, and it will be a right good color.

To make a tawny color: Take lime and water and put them together. Put your hair in for four or five hours. Take it out and put it in tanner's ooze (the liquor of tanbark) for a day. It will be as fine a tawny color as you will need.
The sixth part of your hair you will keep white, for use with the dubbed hook in fishing for trout and grayling, and for small lines to rye for roach and dace.

("Rye" in this sense is not found in any other document. It may refer to some particular method of fishing, or it may be a misprint for "try.")

When your hair is thus colored you must know for which water in which seasons they shall serve.
Green in all clear water from April to September.

Yellow in all clear water from September to November, for it looks like the weed and other grasses in the rivers when they are in flood.

Russet serves all through the winter to the end of April, both in rivers and in pools or lakes.

Brown serves for black and stagnant water, in rivers and other places.

Tawny for heathy or marshy waters.

Now you must make your lines in this way. First see that you have an Instrument, as in the figure shown following. Take your hair, and from the small end cut a full handful or more, because these tapering ends are not strong or sure. Turn your hair from the top to the tail, and divide it all into three parts. At one end make three separate plaits of the three parts, at the other end plait them all into one. Put the single plait into the end of your Instrument that has a single cleft, and set the other end fast with your wedge, about four fingers shorter than the full extent of the hair. Twine each strand the same way, exactly alike, and fasten them in three clusters. Then take out the other end from the cleft. Twine it in the same direction, then strain it a little and knot it so that it will not come undone. And that is good.

You must understand that the most difficult task in making your tackle is to make the hooks. To make them you need proper files, thin and sharp and beaten small; a semiclamp of iron; a bender; a pair of long and small tongs; a hard thick knife; an anvil and a little hammer.

For small fish, make your hooks from the smallest steel needles of square section that you can find, in this way: Put the needle in a red charcoal fire until it is as red as the fire. Then take it out and let it cool, and it will be well enough tempered to be filed. Then raise the barb with your knife, and sharpen the point. Then temper the work again, or it will break in the bending. Then bend it, as in the bend shown in the illustration. In the same way you make greater hooks from greater needles, such as embroiderer's needles, or tailor's, or shoemaker's spear points. Shoemaker's brads are best for big fish. They must all bend at the point when tested, or they will be no good. When the hook is bended beat the other end flat, and file it smooth lest it fray your line. Then put it in the fire again, and work it to an easy red heat. Then quench it suddenly in water, and it will be hard and strong.

To know your instruments, let them be as shown here. (See drawing, right.)

When you have thus made your hooks you set them on your line, in appropriate size and strength, like this: Take thin red silk, doubled for a big hook, but do not plait it. For small hooks it should be single. Bind the line thickly round the end of your hook for a straw's breadth; then set your hook and bind it with the same silk for two-thirds of its length, but when you reach the third part turn back your silk and bind it double. Tuck the end of the silk in at the hole two or three times, binding it fast each time around the shank of your hook. Wet the binding and draw it tight. See that your line is always fixed inside the bend of the hook, not outside. Then cut off all loose ends as close as you can.

You already know which size of hook to use for each kind of fish. Now I shall tell you how many hairs you need in your line for each kind of fish. You fish for the minnow with a line of one hair; for the growing roach, the bleak, the gudgeon and the ruff with a line of two hairs; for the dace and the great roach with a line of three hairs; for the large perch, the flounder, and the small bream with a line of four hairs; for the chub, the grown bream, the tench and the eel with six hairs; for the small trout, the grayling, the barbel, and the great chub with nine hairs; for the great trout with 12 hairs; for the salmon with 15 hairs. For the pike use a copper trace, colored brown with the brown dye already described, and armed with a wire; as I shall tell you later when speaking of pike.
Your lines should be weighted with lead, the nearest weight at least a foot from the hook, and the weight in keeping with the size of your line. There are three ways of weighting a running ground line. For the float on a lying ground line, 10 weights joined together; for the running ground line, nine or 10 small ones. The float should be so heavy that the least nibble from a fish will pull it under the water. Remember to make your weights round and smooth so that they do not catch on stones or weeds. To understand them better see this illustration. (See drawing, page 76.)





Enjoy

John.
 

rudd

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I said trollies but I was being a bit of a wally trolly. That's why I put a disclaimer. Some people need them, I have in some situations, but it might make for fairer matches if there was a limit of tackle people could take, doubt many will agree with that, especially the match men. :LOL:
We know your - off your trolley mate 😵😉😉😆
 

Silver fan 82

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I can’t understand why so many anglers have to slag off other anglers who enjoy fishing a different way to them. Or slag off venues they wouldn’t choose to fish themselves. However you choose to fish there will be plenty of people who derive an equal amount of pleasure fishing another way. With the antis growing in numbers it’s important to have as many anglers of all persuasions as possible.
Seems to be a bit of a reoccurring theme doesn't it Mark? Would be boring if we all fished the same way though?
 
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