Waggler float shotting?

Rick123

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 11, 2018
Messages
1,606
Swim is 8' deep and quick about walking pace (slow walking pace) The books advise shotting under the float, and something like 8 number eight shots down the line. Does that not take too long for the shot to reach the bottom in winter? If the fish are not rising in the water much, maybe a foot, what other shotting would you suggest.

Cheers all.

Rich.
 

Freesolo82

Regular member
Joined
Sep 18, 2019
Messages
401
If its taking to long I would calculate you are fishing too light and need to up the float weight so you can put more shot on the line.

I'm no expert and I'm interested to see the answers you get as I'm looking to fish waggler myself when rod arrives
 

satinet

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2014
Messages
723
You can put a bulk at say 50%-75% depth and droppers from there to the hook link. By bulk i mean bulk of the shot other than the weight that goes at the float.

I'm talking about the left hand of these diagrams. I think what you are worried about is the right hand. Middle would cast badly (more like a slider shotting pattern). Left is a decent setup for bottom fishing generally.
cabe2fc091e6e5e06322503125442dc2.gif

I prefer loaded floats but unloaded floats give you a bit more flexibility in terms of shotting pattern. I tend to use the drennan loaded inserts but they only have 1bb other than the loading. Generally that's enough though. 8ft is quite a deep rig however.

Generally speaking you want to go lighter as you go towards the hook. So every weight is either the same or less as you move down towards the hook. If you put too much weight down the line it casts like a bolas.

If you want the float to not move with the flow you might want to lay some line on the bottom. I don't know if you're talking river or lake here. I've fished a lake where it had a strong tow before (think they had opened the sluice to fill the nearby canal). Fish were still taking as the float moved.
 
Last edited:

satinet

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2014
Messages
723
If its taking to long I would calculate you are fishing too light and need to up the float weight so you can put more shot on the line.

I'm no expert and I'm interested to see the answers you get as I'm looking to fish waggler myself when rod arrives
yes if you want to get it down use a float that lets you put a reasonable bulk down the line but retain a proper amount of shotting around the actual float (if it's not a pre-loaded float).

If you go too "natural" in your fall you can end up catching a lot of 1oz rudd sometimes.
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
10,556
I’d probably go stick if that deep and a river with a bit of winter water on. I only really use waggler up to around 6-7ft deep fairly slow water and if I’m fishing a waggler it’s probably because I want a fairly slow fall rather than trying to bomb to the bottom.
 

nejohn

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
6,096
If you are fishing beyond top n bottom float range, then you need a waggler large enough to carry enough shot to get your bait through the water, I would still use a similar shotting pattern to a lighter float but instead of maybe no8's down the line I might use no4's apart from the bottom couple which I would keep as no8's
 

Freesolo82

Regular member
Joined
Sep 18, 2019
Messages
401
How does the 'bulk shotting' set-up cast? I would be concerned it may cartwheel and be tangle prone but am no sure?
 

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
10,547
How does the 'bulk shotting' set-up cast? I would be concerned it may cartwheel and be tangle prone but am no sure?

This is the problem I had using shot down the line when waggler fishing, books seem to recommend it though so there's probably a knack to it.
 

John Step

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 29, 2016
Messages
1,084
Perhaps I have been wrong in my belief all these years in that when fishing a quick walking pace current my first thoughts would be to use a top and bottom float?
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
10,556
I personally don’t go above 6s down the line for waggler as if you have too much of the floats weight down line they take a while to settle and can be awkward to cast. Plus I tend to use loaded ones which don’t take much shot after you've locked them and I generally use wagglers for searching the water column so don’t want to bomb down. With sticks I like a good bulk or decent sized droppers though as they make casting easier and get the bait down through the generally quicker water you use them in or just through nuisance fish.
 

satinet

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2014
Messages
723
How does the 'bulk shotting' set-up cast? I would be concerned it may cartwheel and be tangle prone but am no sure?
I think it depends on what you mean by bullk. What i'm talking about is only going to be the equivalent of a few no.6s maybe. Nothing like what is near the float. Still only the weight of the spread out number 8s but just bunched together.

As silverfisher says if you use a loaded float then usually you only have a few shot to play with anyway. Unloaded you can do what you want but it's better to stick to a major percentage of the shot at the float.
 

Deejay8

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
864
In that pace of water I'd be using a stick or avon float, rather than a waggler and trotting.
 

Rick123

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 11, 2018
Messages
1,606
But a heavier and a Bolo style float would be better than a traditional stick, even a very large one like 14x4? That was the problem I was thinking about the waggler, not being suited to fast deep water because of the shotting it really needs maybe?
 

Ken the Pacman

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
3,643
The rule of thumb is two thirds of the total around the float then the remaining third in a bulk below half depth tapering so 4 0r 5 no8 2no8 1 no8 down the line if that suits better than strung out.
If you think about what your loose fed maggot or caster are doing your bottom shot will be registering before the loose feed has hit the deck as its heavier even with strung shot.
You cant hold back a waggler like you can a top and bottom float all you can do is drag line and shot on the deck so its still going to hit the bottom quicker than the loose feed assuming you are feeding directly in front of you or preferably slightly down stream which is where you should be casting to as well.
 

satinet

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2014
Messages
723
The rule of thumb is two thirds of the total around the float then the remaining third in a bulk below half depth tapering so 4 0r 5 no8 2no8 1 no8 down the line if that suits better than strung out.
If you think about what your loose fed maggot or caster are doing your bottom shot will be registering before the loose feed has hit the deck as its heavier even with strung shot.
You cant hold back a waggler like you can a top and bottom float all you can do is drag line and shot on the deck so its still going to hit the bottom quicker than the loose feed assuming you are feeding directly in front of you or preferably slightly down stream which is where you should be casting to as well.

Exactly. I always think of a main bulk around the float with a lower bulk with droppers below as most normal waggler setup. With shirt button the second. Obviously infinite variations of the finer setup.
 

Tinca Mad

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 25, 2019
Messages
997
I found Gary Etheridge's Q & A during Lockdown very good on Waggler Fishing. Start watching from 2mins 46Secs:
 

Dave Spence

MD virtual champion 2020. Golden Pie winner 2018.
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2017
Messages
9,721
How does the 'bulk shotting' set-up cast? I would be concerned it may cartwheel and be tangle prone but am no sure?
Make sure your bulk is lighter than your locking shots and that it is placed below half depth. However if you have a reasonable pace, quick walking pace is quite fast, I would be tempted to use a stick unless you are going more than 2 rods out, in which case I would use a balsa or a pacemaker.
 

MarkW

Regular member
Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
1,224
The best way to learn the waggler is go out and fish it a LOT. Try different swims, currents, winds and rigs/shotting/floats. Find out what works and what doesn't, experiment a lot. I did a massive amount of learning back in 1977 as I had my first National on the Trent and needed to master the basics so the tidal Dorset Frome which was open water before the moorings came, flowed both ways and changed depth plus had lots of small dace so plenty of bites and therefore ideal for 20 sessions fishing the waggler.

Guidelines like those above are good starting points but not written in stone.

Yes, you can hold a waggler back but it takes talent, skill and a lot of practice plus the know-how of what is needed in terms of floats and how to shot them.

You can put bulk shot nearer to the float than halfway just needs much more skill to cast without tangling.

You can have not much in the way of shot locking the float with a lot down the line, again, hard to cast but not impossible and may be the route to beating bleak AND a difficult wind (did this on the Thames once to get through to the roach well out in a nasty wind.
 

davylad

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
6,187
Perhaps I have been wrong in my belief all these years in that when fishing a quick walking pace current my first thoughts would be to use a top and bottom float?
You might need to fish well out John, further than most people can handle a stick float, even a balsa or a pacemaker.
 
Top