Waggler close in

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
11,277
I don't think it is think you're over thinking it 😉

Should be something you do virtually as a reflex with whichever one comes natural to you 👍🏻
This is why it would be an effort for me to change what I state I do in the first post. It's just that people then started questioning it so I thought I'd try to defend it.
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
10,975
This is why it would be an effort for me to change what I state I do in the first post. It's just that people then started questioning it so I thought I'd try to defend it.
If it works for you then that's all that really matters 👍🏻
 

MartinWY

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2019
Messages
656
Say you're fishing a waggler off the tip of the rod. You have only a couple of foot of line to the float.

You hook a fish and need to give it line to either swing it in or net it.

Do you -

a) open the bail arm to let out line
b) pull line off the clutch
c) backwind

I don't backwind so usually do A when it's a small fish or B when it's a slightly bigger fish.
I'm a relative novice but as I use barbless hooks I'd never open the bailarm, well maybe if I had a finger controlling the spool. Would depend how springy the line is and whether or not the fish was likely to swim towards me!

The drags on modern reels are so fast, I'd just slacken the drag off enough to let the fish take line, then retighten as it goes. Experienced hands would probably backwind instead, which I understand is preferable to drag due to the difference in line twist, but I'm not an experienced hand :D

It would depend on the size of the fish really as obviously a 3oz roach isn't going to be able to move much drag, so then backwinding would really be the only option I'd consider.

Pulling line off the clutch would be a bit lumpy for the fish wouldnt it? Again with barbless, Im not sure how I'd feel about that, although I've done it as fish approach the net to lessen pressure on the rod.
 

Pyffy

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
202
I think you are overthinking the "backwind" scenario. In most cases there is no need to physically back wind the reel by revolving the handle. The weight of the fish will do that naturally for you if you have the anti-reverse off and you let the rotor/bail arm spin. You can them feather the rotor with your fingers to gain control. Modern reels are especially smooth so even the smallest of fish will take line this way, so I don't flip of the anti-reverse until I need it on my newer ones. Bigger fish will mean you will need to apply more pressure to stop the rotor spinning too fast causing an over spin. It just takes a little practice and is great fun.
 

tincatim

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 22, 2012
Messages
1,444
I think you are overthinking the "backwind" scenario. In most cases there is no need to physically back wind the reel by revolving the handle. The weight of the fish will do that naturally for you if you have the anti-reverse off and you let the rotor/bail arm spin. You can them feather the rotor with your fingers to gain control. Modern reels are especially smooth so even the smallest of fish will take line this way, so I don't flip of the anti-reverse until I need it on my newer ones. Bigger fish will mean you will need to apply more pressure to stop the rotor spinning too fast causing an over spin. It just takes a little practice and is great fun.
That is what I also mean by backwinding, it’s not actually reeling more line out, it’s letting the fish take line off the reel. Just feels the most controlled way to me.
 

Tinca Steve

Irregular member.
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
6,577
I fish for crucians with a 20ft rod with a 6" lash in 4.5 ft of water using a pole float. I used to use a fixed spool with anti reverse switched off. Now l use a pin and it's so much easier. What I did have trouble with was getting the hook back to my hand to rebait with a .3 or .5 pole float as there was insufficient weight to get the rig to drop. I found that a 1g float was heavy enough to make it drop back to my hand. With 1/16th of an inch of the tip of the float showing a 1g float was better than a lighter float.
 
Top