VAR, Michael Oliver and Three Mistakes Last Night

Neil ofthe nene

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I was and still am in favour of using technology to improve the quality of decisions in sport. Just look at the current test match to see how many errors would have been made had the review system not been in place. But I have to think that in football the authorities are making a hash of using it purely so they can get rid of it saying that they tried it and it didn't work. They never wanted it and still don't. Its like breaking the china when your wife asks you to do the washing up. You never have to do it again.

A clear goal in the Aston Villa/Sheffield game was not given, Spurs had a goal disallowed because of an accidental handball after a foul well outside the penalty box (Spurs were not even awarded the foul), United's penalty against Spurs was clearly awarded incorrectly because Pogba initiated the contact that led to him falling over, and in each of last night's three games the FA admit a penalty decision (two for, one against) was incorrect.

I now understand that the VAR official for the Spurs/Sheffield and Spurs/Bournemouth games, Michael Oliver, is to referee the game against Arsenal on Sunday. Surely both teams will object to that referee. Both sides will distrust him. Spurs because Michael Oliver seems to favour Spur's opponents. Arsenal could object on the grounds that the ref may want to favour Spurs to redress the wrongs he has done them.

I believe that the football authorities will eventually scrap all forms of technology stating that having tried to make it work it clearly does not fit with the game. B'lox. They are making that a self fulfilling action.

VAR could be made very simple and workable.

1. Offside only to be judged on foot positions only and close calls, less than 10cm, go with the onfield decision (umpire's call).
2. The ridiculous "handball" before a goal needs to be refined to include only deliberate handball (Bournemouth missed out on a goal last night due to an accidental handball that did not deflect the ball significantly). Or, to redress the imbalance, penalties should be awarded for any kind of handball by a defender.
3. VAR should only be used by the referee when he or she did not have a clear sight of an incident, has a concern that they missed something or if their assistant disagrees with the decision.
4. Managers should get two challenges per half and one in extra time. Successful challenge or close call offside and the challenge is retained. Unsuccessful the challenge is lost. Challenges not used do not get carried forward.
5. Ex players to sit alongside the VAR official as happens with the stewards in F1

To me the above is very simple, would lead to a better use of the technology, reduce interruptions and make the system fairer. Nearly all are already used elsewhere in sport yet the football supremos strangely cannot see the benefits. They would rather see the system fail and abandon it. If they do then one day the upshot will be a club or even nation making a substantial claim for losses if a major match is decided on a refereeing error that technology could have corrected.
 

Yuccaman

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I’ve been surprised from the start that they haven’t used the challenges system like tennis and cricket. I can’t see a downside
 

squimp

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I watched the cricket highlights last night and I think the umpires got 5 key decisions wrong. That is why you need technology.

But it needs to work. I say that as a Spurs fan, having been denied a blatant penalty the other night.
 

JayBee

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Notn to be found a postion on the VAR review council at the season's end......Wearing the common sense hat and badge.
 

160642fishing

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Goal line technology should stay IMO,they are changing the handball rule next season but VAR seems to throw up more problems than it solves,when only the ref and the assistants made the decisions it was always the case that one set of fans agreed and the others didn't,the game went on and everyone forgot about it until the post match interviews.
 

Northantslad

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All 'our' sports are founded on a great history and one of sportspersonship and i am sure that back in the day, decisions were right, wrong and debateable. But i reckon that one thing is for sure, money and what is at stake now given that money involved has fueled less and less tolerance of a wrong decision. Do away with VAR and get back to 'you get some and you don't get some', as whilst i get it that one decision can be seen to wreck a season, i also think, that a wrong decision is just one, that gets balanced out and over a 40 odd game season, the end result is overall proportional to overall performance.

If VAR works well then keep it, if it doesn't then ditch it, or if it is to be kept, then those running it could always be humble enough to get advice from other countries that make it work.
 

H T B

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There will be changes to VAR next season.
At the moment, the Premier league are doing their own thing and not following FIFA guidelines.
Next season, all VAR will come under FIFA and Pierre Callugini (sp) [hills have eyes ref] is in charge.

It is not the video part of VAR, but the human [?] side.

Personally I don't think the VAR should change a ref's decision, as it undermines the on field ref.
They should advise them to go to the pitch side monitor and review their decision.

If you look at the ridiculous Man U penalty.
From where John Moss was standing it looked like the defender came through the back of Fernandes.

VAR, should have said, from a different angle, we can see that Fernandes fouled the defender first, please have a look at the monitor.

If he had have done, Fernandes may have got a red card, and not a penalty.
 

Wise Owl

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There will be changes to VAR next season.
At the moment, the Premier league are doing their own thing and not following FIFA guidelines.
Next season, all VAR will come under FIFA and Pierre Callugini (sp) [hills have eyes ref] is in charge.

It is not the video part of VAR, but the human [?] side.

Personally I don't think the VAR should change a ref's decision, as it undermines the on field ref.
They should advise them to go to the pitch side monitor and review their decision.

If you look at the ridiculous Man U penalty.
From where John Moss was standing it looked like the defender came through the back of Fernandes.

VAR, should have said, from a different angle, we can see that Fernandes fouled the defender first, please have a look at the monitor.

If he had have done, Fernandes may have got a red card, and not a penalty.

That dont happen when they are trying to help a team into the Champions League ;)
 

Northantslad

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I might agree with the equalling out theory if Man I didn't get so many penalties, particularly at home.


As a Utd fan though, i do always have to smile when it always seems to be us, trouble is no-one makes any observations when:

Southampton score in the 97th minute....when 5 were indicated
No punishment for a potential ankle/leg breaker on Greenwood the other night
All the talk of fergie time, when actually Arsenal have scored the most post 90 min goals in prem history

We might still be paying for all the favourable decisions in some peoples eyes, so unlikely that the above gets any air time, but Utd fans do see everything for and against and a good few happy to recognise it too (y)
 
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