Trotting in a straight line

Silverfisher

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I agree trotting with a waggler is a very underrated tactic. Most of my best river sessions have been on waggler as when it works (quite often suitable for it on a slow river like mine) it’s more efficient simply by being easier to fish for me.
 

Zerkalo

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I've had some alright days on the waggler on the Severn. When I walked the banks of a few stretches with more moderate flow last season I said they looked spot on for the waggler but ended up fishing it on some faster pegs and it goes through quite quickly a few rod lengths out.
 

dave brittain 1

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I've had some alright days on the waggler on the Severn. When I walked the banks of a few stretches with more moderate flow last season I said they looked spot on for the waggler but ended up fishing it on some faster pegs and it goes through quite quickly a few rod lengths out.
Bear in mind the waggler will go through at the same pace as your loose feed. Use a thick topped peacock waggler and don't be frightened to drag some line on the bottom taking shot off if necessary to counteract the drag. The call it a waggler because that's what it does when waggling through the peg, i.e. at some points there could be 2 ins of tip showing and as the hook and line drag it may drag down until it's almost disappeared and then all of a sudden will pop up again as you find and decent bit of bottom or deeper water and it speeds up again.

Generally if you can fish a stick in the man flow, you can fish a waggler. Trundled meat on a big balsa or pellet waggler can also be deadly on the Severn.
 

Zerkalo

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Trundled meat on a big balsa or pellet waggler can also be deadly on the Severn.

Cheers again Dave. This was something I've been wanting to try, wondering how you'd feed it if you don't mind me asking? I thought about loose feeding meat but I've been warned it might travel quite a way downstream before hitting the bottom.
 

BBear

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I agree with everything Dave has said although I still like to use my old Abu 506M when I can - I totally accept that an open face is a better option and often I curse myself for using it after the nth time the line catches. Often I won’t put it in the bag just to make myself use an open face reel.
 

alsur

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Waggler can also be useful on shallow swims where in causes less disturbance when you strike.
 

squimp

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Listen to what DB1 says and then go and watch a couple of float only matches on decent stretches where the top boys fish.
 

dave brittain 1

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Cheers again Dave. This was something I've been wanting to try, wondering how you'd feed it if you don't mind me asking? I thought about loose feeding meat but I've been warned it might travel quite a way downstream before hitting the bottom.
Feed hemp and wash the meat in hot water after you have cut it into cubes. Another bait to consider is corn, not a renowned barbel bait but it can be very effective and it gets down quick.

Usually if I'm pleasure fishing I tend to target chub with hemp and caster on the float, (you need a good few pints of bait). Set up wise I'll usually be on decent gear but if barbel move in as they sometimes do as they like the same features, I'll step up my tackle and if necessary revert to meat as a change bait sometimes on the float and quite often on the bomb with stepped up gear again if it's taking too long to get them out or there are snags.

I've had some of my best barbel catches on the stickfloat using hemp and caster particularly on the Swale so be selective in your swim noting that in summer pegs that are 3-6 ft with a bit of flow and cover are generally the ones to head for next to weir pools and broken water particularly if there are gullies or streamer weed.
 

HALTON DANGLER

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The most common mistake or misconception i see in fishing rivers and im talking small ones here is the thought that length of rod is relation to the depth of a venue. while this is true on big rivers we use them for deep swims on smaller rivers i will often use a longer 17ft rod depite river being small and 4ft deep. you can not beat the extra control length of the rod gives you

others of course are line, the more the line floats the easier it is tolift form the water when you mend the line.

finally, and this is the harsh reality some dont like to hear, its not a method for overnight success,it takes time and practice and a lot of the skill in stick float fishing comes from time spent getting the art of th float fishing right
 

Zerkalo

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Feed hemp and wash the meat in hot water after you have cut it into cubes. Another bait to consider is corn, not a renowned barbel bait but it can be very effective and it gets down quick.

Usually if I'm pleasure fishing I tend to target chub with hemp and caster on the float, (you need a good few pints of bait). Set up wise I'll usually be on decent gear but if barbel move in as they sometimes do as they like the same features, I'll step up my tackle and if necessary revert to meat as a change bait sometimes on the float and quite often on the bomb with stepped up gear again if it's taking too long to get them out or there are snags.

I've had some of my best barbel catches on the stickfloat using hemp and caster particularly on the Swale so be selective in your swim noting that in summer pegs that are 3-6 ft with a bit of flow and cover are generally the ones to head for next to weir pools and broken water particularly if there are gullies or streamer weed.
Nice one again! I saw the hot water tip for meat on a Jamie Hughes video and so will try that but I might also riddle some meat and mix it with a sticky groundbait? Either way thanks for the tips and I'm determined to catch a few Barbel on the float this season as it's just a different way to fish for them than legering and I've heard of big Severn catches 100lb+ I can only dream of on the float.
 

Sam Vimes

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The most common mistake or misconception i see in fishing rivers and im talking small ones here is the thought that length of rod is relation to the depth of a venue. while this is true on big rivers we use them for deep swims on smaller rivers i will often use a longer 17ft rod depite river being small and 4ft deep. you can not beat the extra control length of the rod gives you
I couldn't agree more. On a stillwater, I'll only use a rod as long as the depth of water in front of me really requires. Unless there's 10'+ in front of you, there's rarely any need to use longer than 13'. However, when bank fishing on a river, I'll tend to use as long a rod as the surroundings will allow. If the water is as little as a foot deep is largely irrelevant. The exception would be if I'm wading. Long rods and wading are not good bedfellows.
 

robert d

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Any tips on this? I'm not bad at it and often use long rods which seem to help. I think it is mostly down to flow (as well as mending the line and feeding it out properly) and you need a smooth glide to get it 100% of the time. As sometimes when I'm trotting on faster parts of the Severn, the float will sometimes swing back towards the inside bank?
I found that if i dont drink any alcohol i can trot quite str8
 
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