Trotting corn??🌽

Kildea90

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With the river season approaching my attention will turn from still waters and canals to flowing water. Friday morning we ventured out in search of tench on a local lake, we used our standard approach for tench fishing a waggler over depth and bait was red maggot and corn. We caught 3 tench along with some skimmers and good stamp of roach. This is a pretty standard when targeting tench with such baits. However this has got me thinking of perhaps trotting corn this coming season for roach. When targeting roach on flowing water I trot the standard maggot,tare,bread punch,caster etc, Iv fished corn on a swim feeder many of time on river which has always caught bream and good roach but Iv never attempted trotting it. Anyone attempted this approach?? 🎣🌽
 

tincatim

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I’ve caught roach and chub on trotted corn, I hear grayling are quite partial to it too. Just have to be aware that corn is relatively heavy so when loose feeding it might not travel far from where it enters the water (flow and depth dependant of course).
 

matt

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Can’t see any reason why it wouldn’t work for roach.....have had plenty of success trotting corn for Grayling.
 

Silverfisher

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Tried it many times never had much joy on it. Seen my grandad make it work once though. My theory is it sinks too quick so maybe work better if just the skins. Seems a bit pointless to me when there’s things like hemp and tares that are tried and tested.
 

Sam Vimes

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I've caught plenty of chub on floatfished corn, but not that many roach. That probably has a lot to do with the rivers I fish though.

I’ve caught roach and chub on trotted corn, I hear grayling are quite partial to it too. Just have to be aware that corn is relatively heavy so when loose feeding it might not travel far from where it enters the water (flow and depth dependant of course).
I keep reading about grayling liking corn. My suspicion is that it's rather dependent on the river in question. I've tried it once or twice a season (over several decades) on my local rivers. I'm yet to catch a single grayling on it. The brownies and chub like it well enough, but the grayling don't seem interested.
 

matt

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That could have something in it as all the Grayling that I have caught trotting on corn have come from the Test

Haven’t tried it on other rivers as I don’t have local access to them using coarse methods in winter
 

Simon R

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I keep reading about grayling liking corn. My suspicion is that it's rather dependent on the river in question. I've tried it once or twice a season (over several decades) on my local rivers. I'm yet to catch a single grayling on it. The brownies and chub like it well enough, but the grayling don't seem interested.
Ditto - I think sweetcorn is a little too sophisticated for Yorkshire grayling

Simon
 

Carmody

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I’ve tried it a couple of times trotting for Roach on the lower Severn. Never done much good - possibly because the Roach are quite small.
 

Arry

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Corn is not good for grayling... read somewhere that you should not feed corn if you are using it on the hook
 

Total

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Corn is not good for grayling... read somewhere that you should not feed corn if you are using it on the hook
Remember reading something similar H' but got the impression it was an urban myth more than anything....Corn, mostly water and full of amino acids....
 

Arry

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I heard that the grayling had difficulty in digesting it... urban myth or not... I'll not feed corn just in case
 

TiggerXFM

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I virtually always use sweetcorn and maggots when trotting. Either one of them on the hook, or both of them used as a cocktail catches me everything in the river.
I think I tried using sweetcorn once time when trotting for grayling, they either weren't interested in it or they didn't get chance to take it as the trout were on it pretty sharp'ish.
If grayling do have difficulty in digesting corn I imagine hey would just pass it out their rear end the same as it went in the front....same as my dogs do!
 

lliopp

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I think corn is difficult to digest full stop. I have seen bream pass corn after fishing prebaited swims, also seen my kids nappies with whole kernels.
 
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