The Urbanization Of Our Parks, Open Spaces and Fishing

mickthechippy

space cadet
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Apr 23, 2008
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Over the past decade

We have had constructed what is known as "The Stour Valley Way"

this is a hard surfaced path built alongside a fair stretch of the river stour, vastly improving access along and across the river

bridges have been built, picnic areas, and seating along about a 10 to 12 mile length, with more planned

now, while this has been constructed for average joe and his family to get out on high days and holidays, it has also proved to be much nicer and considerably easier access for the angler

theres a fair bit of bank between the path and pegs-swims, so your able to sit without worrying about your tackle being in the way or getting broke
 

Robwooly

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Jun 8, 2020
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You forget that anglers, like me, need a toilet nearby; also if there is a cafe of come sort, it's a convivial place to eat - including anglers. There are plenty of 'wild spaces' where you can fish - literally hundreds of miles of drains in the Fens which never, ever, see an angler.
I know some anglers need loos and easy access as I often take my dad who is in his 80s, but we could easily say there's hundreds of fisheries with those conveniences already in situ where such facilities are welcome.

It's a balancing act and I'd hate to see more of the places I hold dear getting the Sim City makeover, whether i'd be saying that when I need them is another matter though, I hope I don't but time will tell (y)
 

Robwooly

Regular member
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
369
Over the past decade

We have had constructed what is known as "The Stour Valley Way"

this is a hard surfaced path built alongside a fair stretch of the river stour, vastly improving access along and across the river

bridges have been built, picnic areas, and seating along about a 10 to 12 mile length, with more planned

now, while this has been constructed for average joe and his family to get out on high days and holidays, it has also proved to be much nicer and considerably easier access for the angler

theres a fair bit of bank between the path and pegs-swims, so your able to sit without worrying about your tackle being in the way or getting broke
I feel i'm in the minority for not liking these sort of improvements. It always makes things so busy and sometimes attracts the wrong sorts, maybe i'm selfish for wanting rivers to be used for walkers, anglers and birdwatchers etc who don't mind getting their feet wet. What happens when the canoe centre is built in the city centre there? I've heard from others that some at Canterbury council would like to see fishing off the agenda. It's such a gorgeous river the Stour and it was good to get away from the crowds when I fished there, so I hope all these changes are still seen as positive by the local anglers in a decade or so (y)
 

Zerkalo

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Jul 4, 2019
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9,002
There's an estate lake near me that's in the middle of a park, it's the only park I'd consider fishing really, but it is very busy. You fish basically just off the path on the dam wall so you have to check being you and wait for a gap in the walkers to be able to cast. My dad says he won't fish there as he doesn't want an audience every time he catches a fish.

I don't mind. I'd prefer solitude and a nice quite Tench lake to fish but it's still a nice looking place that has to be shared given how popular it is. The toilet blocks are useful and it feels safe enough to leave your tackle to go to the toilet too, something that might not be possible on many busy parks.

One thing I read recently, bit off topic, there used to be a brickworks nearby that pumped silt into the lake somehow. When this stopped a good few years ago the lake became much clearer and weedier. I've been lucky finding a relatively weed free peg there but can imagine going back and struggling with the weed.
 
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