The unexpected.

Sportsman

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I was getting a few things in Lidle this afternoon, when I heard a scream behind me. A man had collapsed onto the floor about 6ft away.
I checked that he was unresponsive and looked for signs of spontaneous breathing. Unfortunately, he was not breathing, so made sure staff had an ambulance on the way and that someone was bringing the Defib.
I started chest compression only resuscitation (not a good idea to attempt rescue breaths at the moment what with Covid)
After a minute or two the defib arrived and once connected was indicating Ventricular Fibrillation, so gave a shock, which was unsuccessful and one of the staff continued with chest compressions. whilst I monitored the defib and gave shocks as directed by the machine.
Long story short, the paramedics arrived and took over. When I left they were still working on him, but to little avail I fear.
He wasn't an elderly man, in his 40s maybe. Massive tragedy for his family. It is probably what triggered my rant on another thread. You can take all the precautions you like, but the unexpected will still get you.:oops:
Stay safe
 

Maesknoll

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I was getting a few things in Lidle this afternoon, when I heard a scream behind me. A man had collapsed onto the floor about 6ft away.
I checked that he was unresponsive and looked for signs of spontaneous breathing. Unfortunately, he was not breathing, so made sure staff had an ambulance on the way and that someone was bringing the Defib.
I started chest compression only resuscitation (not a good idea to attempt rescue breaths at the moment what with Covid)
After a minute or two the defib arrived and once connected was indicating Ventricular Fibrillation, so gave a shock, which was unsuccessful and one of the staff continued with chest compressions. whilst I monitored the defib and gave shocks as directed by the machine.
Long story short, the paramedics arrived and took over. When I left they were still working on him, but to little avail I fear.
He wasn't an elderly man, in his 40s maybe. Massive tragedy for his family. It is probably what triggered my rant on another thread. You can take all the precautions you like, but the unexpected will still get you.:oops:
Stay safe
That’s why I live for the moment and don’t stash away thousands for the future..... you never know when your time is up.

Someone I knew collapsed and died, very unexpectedly and suddenly, everyone suspected a heart attack, PM discovered a split aorta, Coroner said even if he had been in hospital, there was nothing that could have been done.
 

Yorkieboy70

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Well done for at least trying to help, I would know what to do with rescue breaths and chest compressions, would have no idea how to use defibrillator.
 

The one and only Harvey

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Well done for at least trying to help, I would know what to do with rescue breaths and chest compressions, would have no idea how to use defibrillator.
The machine tells you exactly what to do, so don't hesitate to use one if the situations arises. Get if out of the box, turn it on, and follow the instructions.
 

Yorkieboy70

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Always told by my first aid instructor, if someone wasnt breathing better to even do something badly than do nothing at all. I would always have a go, if there not breathing you cant make it any worse
 

Philocalist

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Well done for trying Sportsman - it's rarely mentioned, but I know from experience it can be brutally hard, completely exhausting, to try and perform chest compressions for more than a few minutes, never mind trying to keep it up until help arrives.
If you have the chance for training, perhaps free through work, I'd encourage people to take part, in the strongest terms possible.
I trained as an Emergency Aider, almost 20 years ago - the training was very much about keeping people alive until better qualified people arrived, rather than helping with wounds and injuries.
Since then, I've had to use those skills seriously three times. Twice, someone was still ticking over when the Paramedics arrived, and the person survived. Tragically, the third, unsuccessful attempt was most recent, and much closer to home, when my partner went upstairs to find her mother on the floor, just 30 minutes after talking to her and everything appearing to be OK.
I've no accurate idea of how long it took for the Paramedics to arrive - I continued compressions continuously for what felt like hours and was almost on the point of collapse when they arrived. Regretably, despite them trying to revive her for a considerable time, it was all over about an hour later.
Ironically, as a mother-in-law, she was a diamond, and already living within our household; still very much missed, RIP
 

robert d

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I was getting a few things in Lidle this afternoon, when I heard a scream behind me. A man had collapsed onto the floor about 6ft away.
I checked that he was unresponsive and looked for signs of spontaneous breathing. Unfortunately, he was not breathing, so made sure staff had an ambulance on the way and that someone was bringing the Defib.
I started chest compression only resuscitation (not a good idea to attempt rescue breaths at the moment what with Covid)
After a minute or two the defib arrived and once connected was indicating Ventricular Fibrillation, so gave a shock, which was unsuccessful and one of the staff continued with chest compressions. whilst I monitored the defib and gave shocks as directed by the machine.
Long story short, the paramedics arrived and took over. When I left they were still working on him, but to little avail I fear.
He wasn't an elderly man, in his 40s maybe. Massive tragedy for his family. It is probably what triggered my rant on another thread. You can take all the precautions you like, but the unexpected will still get you.:oops:
Stay safe
Well done for trying ,you did all you could 👏. I hope you are ok ,if its playing on your mind please seek help for yourself. Well done again
 

Wise Owl

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Well done Sporty mate most people of all ages now would have had their Phones out Recording it :mad::mad: As has already been said Live for today, ive enjoyed and done what i wanted in my life and will continue till my time comes. Remember this, we are here for a Good time not a Long time (y) stay safe and Enjoy.
 

tipitinmick

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Wow, respect Sportsman. You sound quite calm. Think I may have panicked myself. Well done you 👍
 

Dave Spence

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Nice to hear that there are still people willing to have a go rather than watch others. Well done Dave👍
 

Scribe

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Well done Sortsman on your efforts, it's not everyone that can keep a clear mind and focus on what needs to be done. I have completed St John's First Aid courses many years ago with work, but remember the DR'S ABCD better.

Everyone should read this one page First Aid DR'S ABCD instruction sheet.
 

RedhillPhil

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I understand that nowadays - and has been so for some years - that mouth to mouth has been discontinued. Chest compressions only.
 

Maesknoll

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I understand that nowadays - and has been so for some years - that mouth to mouth has been discontinued. Chest compressions only.
If you are trained, its still part of CPR, the chest compression only CPR is for the untrained.
 

dry nets

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Nice effort sportsman
I believe we have a biological clock in ours bodies. The day we are born sets the clock off. It gives a random date and that’s it. You might add/subtract a couple yours with your life style.
A mates mate died in lockdown from heart failure, 53yrs old and fit as a fiddle. Ran iron mans etc out training every day. Never smoked and his diet was bang on. Doctors said his lifestyle hide the heart condition and probably give home a few extra years.
 

Sportsman

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Thanks for your kind words, but I should point out that it is something that I have done for a living for over 50 years, so I have done it probably hundreds of times. It was not as traumatic for me as it otherwise might have been.
Re: compression only, in these infectious times it is recommended that you should not put your face down over the pts. nose and mouth, to check breathing, and that all rescuers should perform chest compression only resuscitation, regardless of their training. If something is available, then a light cover, placed over their nose and mouth is a good idea, to prevent exhalation into your face as you perform the compressions. You should, of course, be wearing your own mask already ;)

 
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Godber

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Well done Sportsman, you can only do what you've been trained to do to promote the chances of survival. I've done it a few times on the job but only once out of work. I had everything chucked at me aswell, Asda staff insisting on putting her in the recovery position without checking her breathing. Asda staff reluctant to give me the de-fib even though they didn't have a scooby how to use it. A frantic bystander questioning whether or not l was qualified to use a de-fib. Agonal breathing and bystanders pointing out that she was alive why were we still doing cpr.
Emergency operator insisting l give resue breaths even though her airway was full of frothy blood and saliva. Asda staff going into shock, not listening to my instructions to stay clear as l was about to administer a shock.
Nightmare, l gave 3 shocks and then 3 no shocks advised before paramedics turned up, it seemed like an age. The old girl was Italian, she fractured her skull when she collapsed and died a week later as a result but it gave the family a chance to be at her side. At least the old girl didn't die on a cold wet Asda carpark.
 

tipitinmick

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Nice effort sportsman
I believe we have a biological clock in ours bodies. The day we are born sets the clock off. It gives a random date and that’s it. You might add/subtract a couple yours with your life style.
A mates mate died in lockdown from heart failure, 53yrs old and fit as a fiddle. Ran iron mans etc out training every day. Never smoked and his diet was bang on. Doctors said his lifestyle hide the heart condition and probably give home a few extra years.
Don't say that pal. I'm 53 and overweight. 😣. I best start looking after myself better. 😲
 

Sportsman

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Well done Sportsman, you can only do what you've been trained to do to promote the chances of survival. I've done it a few times on the job but only once out of work. I had everything chucked at me aswell, Asda staff insisting on putting her in the recovery position without checking her breathing. Asda staff reluctant to give me the de-fib even though they didn't have a scooby how to use it. A frantic bystander questioning whether or not l was qualified to use a de-fib. Agonal breathing and bystanders pointing out that she was alive why were we still doing cpr.
Emergency operator insisting l give resue breaths even though her airway was full of frothy blood and saliva. Asda staff going into shock, not listening to my instructions to stay clear as l was about to administer a shock.
Nightmare, l gave 3 shocks and then 3 no shocks advised before paramedics turned up, it seemed like an age. The old girl was Italian, she fractured her skull when she collapsed and died a week later as a result but it gave the family a chance to be at her side. At least the old girl didn't die on a cold wet Asda carpark.

Yep
It can turn into a circus quick enough. I had a retired GP tell me a patient who was taking a gasping breath every 20 seconds or so didn't need CPR because they were breathing and a nurse tell me that I shouldn't use a defib on a cas in V Fib because "that was a Doctors job"
I had one guy arrest 3 times in the back of an ambulance and each time I had to peel his old wife of him before I could shock him. He made it, as well.
One of the nicest things that has happened to me. I used to train standby crews for the rigs in the N. Sea. A lot didn't want to do it, but it was mandatory training. Most had realised that it was a good idea by the end of the week. One day a young couple and toddler came into the office in Aberdeen and asked for me. The young man was one I had trained a few weeks earlier. They told me the story of how they had the toddler in bed with them one night and had woken in the middle of the night to find the wee one cold and blue.
The guy remembered what I had shown him and successfully resuscitated his daughter.
It was the little girl's 3rd birthday and they had brought her in to say thank you. She climbed on my lap and gave me a kiss and I had to pop out for a sec because of dust in the eye. (It is coming back again as I write this)
That was a good day, and I didn't do anything (y) :)
 
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