The Saga of Mugger's Rive D36.

Peter

'Mugger'
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As some of you will know way back in October I managed to acquire A Rive D36 that had been donated to a Charity Auction to raise funds to get a defibrillator that would be located on site at Alders Farm Fishery. They are a seatbox that I've wanted for a good while, however to get a new one with the sort of spec I would have wanted would probably have required an outlay as close to a Thousand Pounds as makes no difference, a price that I just wasn't prepared to pay. The angler that donated it had been very happy with it for the five years that he used it but unfortunately a serious accident meant he couldn't use it and it had languished in the back of his garage for over five years but he felt it may raise a few quid for a worthy cause. It had an extensive package of trays and drawers and that was what attracted me to it as well as donating to a worthy cause at a favourite fishery of mine.

With me being retired it offered the chance of a nice little project to refurb it and give it a new lease of life. Then came lockdown and it wasn't till a couple of Saturdays ago that I was able to finally get down to Alders and collect it.

Box collection.jpg

So to the refurb, well not exactly :( Back home I got clawed by a cat and a couple of days later I had a swollen bright red forearm that's required a second course of stronger antibiotics to get it under control so that now I can make a start.

I'm not looking to achieve a box that looks that's just been unwrapped straight from the manufacturer but more a box that's suited to what I want from it and meets my needs without spending a small fortune fitting brand new parts.
So with my arm now on the mend I'm in a position to make a start on it and I'll use this thread to detail what I do during the refurb and update it as and when.;)
 

Peter

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So first things first was to finally take a look at just what I actually have and the issues that need to be addressed.
Now it's a 10 year old box (There's a date stamp underneath the original seat which confirmed that). One of the big criticisms that you hear about these earlier boxes is that when you sit on them the top drawer won't slide out and this one was suffering from it. when you look it's pretty obvious its down to poor design and the materials used. The vast majority of seat boxes have a seat that is attached by hinges/clips to a tray. However with this the seat is attached directly to the drawer unit that is then clipped to a tray. The drawer unit is attached to the seat base by 4 screws and undoing these means that the seat can be removed.

The actual seat itself was in remarkable condition for it's age, the cover has no tears or loose stitching, and the foam doesn't appear to have deteriorated in any way which \i find remarkable given it's age, The seat base however reveals the obvious cause of the problem being made of nothing more than thick hardboard offering little real support especially after 10 years. I had an offcut of plywood that I cut to fit and bonded to the base and chamfered the edge where the draw meets it. then refitted it to the frame. It certainly seems to have done the job. It remains to be seen just how comfortable the seat is in use, the initial impression is that it's fine and it will be used for the time being, however if it proves to be unsatisfactory I will probably change it for one of the after market seats that are now available from various sources.

One other item also needed to be addressed immediately, the missing handwheel that you will notice in the picture of me sitting on the box when I collected it.
The standard handwheels fitted are plastic with a threaded metal insert. Not a great design as if the insert seizes on the thread of the leg block it's possible for it to tear out as had happened in this case. so rather than fit a standard replacement handwheel I've sourced a new set of after market handwheels from GT Angling Products. These are CNC manufactured in aluminium with a stainless steel threaded insert - for maximum thread life and a knurled finish to enable good grip and a profiled inside-face which gives a better clamping action at a cost of £35

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An added bonus is that these are smaller and when fitted knock 2 inches off the width of the box once fitted. ;)
 

Peter

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what thread size are them peter
I'm not sure what the thread size is if I'm honest, they are designed purely to fit Rive boxes with the closed leg system, so that's both the D25 and the D36.
***** THEY ARE NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE RIVE OPEN LEG SYSTEM. *****
 

nico12

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Looks in decent condition already Peter - Good luck with the refurb. I have owned two Rives and loved them. My only reason for moving them on was - first one was the Sphinx and was just too big for my then car ( didnt check before :) ) and the second just got a little heavy for transporting to most of the venues i fished at the time. The new handwheels look great and that reduction in size could be a game changer !!
 

Peter

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One of the thing that's been obvious looking at this box is that I very much doubt that it's received any degree of maintenance over the course of its life other than the occasional wash. Not uncommon to a lot of boxes but surprising when you think of the amount paid to purchase them.

That was very obvious looking at the clasps that secure the trays together and to the frame. with a lot of the shiny pins being far from it and showing heavy corrosion.
Not that much of a problem you may think, just fit new ones. Except there's 36 clips on the combination of trays and drawers that came with the box!!!
Replacing them at £5 a pair would cost a minimum of £90 and that's if you can source them.

Rive Main Dealers normally hold good stocks of spares for the boxes but due to the effects of Covid and Brexit stock is vey low for a lot of spares or non existent at the present time.

However a pair of these can be your friend..............

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The clips can be awkward to remove (Understatement :rolleyes:) as I found out having practiced on a damaged tray that came with the box.
However with a pair of locking long nose pliers gripping the corroded pin and a bit of gentle pressure applied with a pin hammer the pin can be removed with the clasp remaining in situ . I the cleaned up the corrosion with a small wire wheel fitted to a Dremmel.

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With it all cleaned up it's just a matter of gently tapping the pin, cleaned up section first back into the clasp job done as can be seen in the picture below showing the before and after of a couple of the clasps I removed from the damaged tray.

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Peter

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Bit disappointing today, grey and overcast and feeling a bit cool after the last couple of days. Anyway despite this I decided to strip the frame down.
It's a job that really couldn't be easier, you just need one 4mm Allen key to remove the 4 bolts that secure the footplate to the runners and the 4 bolts that secure the front and rear platform locking catches, and a flat bladed screwdriver to prise out the plastic caps from the frame and legs. The only other tool you should need is an appropriate drill should you wish to remove the base tray attached to the top of the frame as it's riveted on and these will require drilling out.
My frame is in decent condition and as I have no plans at this point to repaint or powder coat it I've not removed the base tray on mine.
The plastic runners for the footplate are each secured by 2 crosshead screw positioned under the frame base on either side.
Backplate fastening varies a lot on these boxes but mine is just fitted with 4 plastic trim clips similar to those found on most cars that locate into holes in the frame..

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To remove the leg clamps from the footplate and frame is a simple job, completely remove the handwheels and slide the legs out, then the shroud can be slid off and the clamp slid out of the frame/footplate.. It's at this point in time that the lack of maintenance over the course of the last ten years raised it's ugly head. The body of the clamping system itself is obviously plastic/nylon in construction which as such provides a degree of non marking protection when tightened up to hold the leg in place, However the case that it sits in and retains the thread is obviously made of poor grade "Monkey Metal" for want of a better description and had corroded badly over the years due to neglect. However with the help of an offcut from a worktop, some fine emery paper and some WD40 a lot of the corrosion was removed returning them to a serviceable standard. when I reinstall them they'll receive a coating of copper grease to the metal surfaces which should hopefully prevent any further issues, as indeed will any threaded components that I remove and reinstall.
 

Peter

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Nice sunny day up here today, so time to sort out the scuffs and scratches on the footplate and legs. For me it was a no brainer, they were going to get painted.
Now I know that the original black finish on these is supposedly anodised but it's not the cheapest process and even once done it will still wear off in places and be prone to scratching, the same with powder coating which I know some have have done, especially to the footplate. Either process means the stripping down of every last nut, bolt and rivet and it's not something I deemed necessary to achieve the result I'm looking for.

Lets face it a box gets used, footplates get stood on and box legs get adjusted and have accessories bolted to them every time they're used so they will attract scuffs and scratches and with that the easiest/cheapest way to avoid becoming paranoid is to simply paint them so that they can easily be retouched if the need arises.

With that in mind all the components were given a good scrub with warm soapy water the given a going over with wet & dry paper to remove any obvious digs and scratches and offer a good key for the paint that was to follow. Any bare areas then had etch primer applied.

The paint of choice was one @Dave used when refurbing his older model Rive, PRO-COTE SATIN BLACK, It's a premium quality, quick drying tough industrial acrylic paint that offers good resistance to weathering and cracking. It's suitable for use on most metals, wood and rigid plastics and is suitable for over-coating all conventional primers. At £5.40 for a 500ml aerosol from my local ToolStation it wasn't going to break the bank either. ;)

Hung up on the washing lines this morning it was just a question of applying a light coat to all the bits then relaxing with a cup of coffee before applying another.
It resulted in ☕☕☕☕ coffee's during the course of the morning but I'm happy with the result I've achieved and it should be relatively simple to touch up any knocks and scratches in the future without to much hassle.

Footplate.jpg

Legs.jpg
 

scuttster

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Nice sunny day up here today, so time to sort out the scuffs and scratches on the footplate and legs. For me it was a no brainer, they were going to get painted.
Now I know that the original black finish on these is supposedly anodised but it's not the cheapest process and even once done it will still wear off in places and be prone to scratching, the same with powder coating which I know some have have done, especially to the footplate. Either process means the stripping down of every last nut, bolt and rivet and it's not something I deemed necessary to achieve the result I'm looking for.

Lets face it a box gets used, footplates get stood on and box legs get adjusted and have accessories bolted to them every time they're used so they will attract scuffs and scratches and with that the easiest/cheapest way to avoid becoming paranoid is to simply paint them so that they can easily be retouched if the need arises.

With that in mind all the components were given a good scrub with warm soapy water the given a going over with wet & dry paper to remove any obvious digs and scratches and offer a good key for the paint that was to follow. Any bare areas then had etch primer applied.

The paint of choice was one @Dave used when refurbing his older model Rive, PRO-COTE SATIN BLACK, It's a premium quality, quick drying tough industrial acrylic paint that offers good resistance to weathering and cracking. It's suitable for use on most metals, wood and rigid plastics and is suitable for over-coating of all conventional primers. At £5.40 for a 500ml aerosol from my local ToolStation it wasn't going to break the bank either. ;)

Hung up on the washing lines this morning it was just a question of applying a light coat to all the bits then relaxing with a cup of coffee before applying another.
It resulted in ☕☕☕☕ coffee's during the course of the morning but I'm happy with the result I've achieved and it should be relatively simple to touch up any knocks and scratches in the future without to much hassle.

Footplate.jpg

Legs.jpg
Looks like the hsp footplate. Are you stick one of these on it to reduce wear and make it less slippy?
 

Peter

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Looks like the hsp footplate. Are you stick one of these on it to reduce wear and make it less slippy?
It is indeed the HSP footplate. The Jury is out on fitting one at the moment, the existing bars have grip strips already so I'll probably wait till I've used it a few times to see if I feel it's needed or just added decoration. ;)
 
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