The old Harrier HHP-110 Pole

Mixin123

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Apr 22, 2018
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I've just bought one of these for the princely sum of £30 with 2 top kits.

Before purchasing, I read on the Pole handle that it weighed a minuscule 665g at 11M in length so thought it would be nice & light, ideal for Canal work.

How wrong was I?

I tried it out tonight & it seems a lot more difficult to handle & hold than my Middy Pole which weighs nearly 1080G - almost double the weight at the same length.

It's also a ballache to ship & unship with sweaty palms. There's too much friction, presumably because of the cross weave pattern.

Has anyone had one of these or still use it?

What elastic would be its limit and ideal venue for the Pole?

Also, anyone know how old it is & have any tips for smooth shipping and shipping that prevents the Pole bouncing around when doing so?

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Simon R

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Your pole was a new model in the 1989 catalogue and
"manufactured from premium quality high modulus strength carbon sheet incorporating silicon carbide micro-whiskers totally encased in a high strength carbon braid"
The catalogue says its 690g at 11m and it cost £650 when new. and came with a single spare top two kit
The 12.5m extension weighed 200g and would have set you back another £130

I'm not sure if pole rollers had even been invented in 1989 - if they were around they were just the simple V rollers that screwed into a bankstick - most people shipped back over their holdall. It was also still common to break the pole every couple of sections rather than try to ship the whole thing back in one go,
Rather than slide it try 'grabbing' the pole and pass it from hand to hand - crossing your arms as you do so - not easy to describe but really easy to demonstrate - may be easier and smoother (with a little practice)

In 1989 carp lakes were in their infancy and no.8 elastic was the heaviest available - it will probably take stronger elastic - old poles do seem to be pretty bomb-proof - unfortunately there's probably only one way to find out and it might prove to be expensive if you get it wrong

Simon
 

IanG1

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I had one brand new in 1989 and paid around £900 with the extension and top kits LOL from Gerrys of Nottingham
The strongest elastic you could get back then was a ZIM no8 but they are a strong piece of kit (Yours has lasted 30 years) so they would easily cope with modern 12/14 I would think. Also proves its not just about weight but balance and anything top end heavy will feel awful compared to more modern stuff.
For £30 whats to loose, there is one on Ebay wanting £80 at the moment.
 

Ken the Pacman

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I can confirm that they would take doubled Zim No 8 no problem as it was a strong pole back in the day so I dont think a 14 to 16 would be a problem but if you break anything its the repair option only as that mandrel is obsolete.
 
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