The Mentality of a Doctors receptionist ????

mickthechippy

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Had call to contact my doctor over the past week (yearly thing)

Now the surgery is semi-closed due to covid, that I can understand , but sometimes I wonder how a receptionists brain works ????

Rang in to book a telephone appointment at first, got through in the end after being held ages in a queue, and booked a call back for the afternoon "surgery",

doctor called back later, and we went through the required, which resulted in a text after we had spoken, to come along to the surgery next day and pick up an appointment card for blood tests and an X-ray at the local hospital, and to book an appointment with the surgerys COPD nurse to check up on if my lungs had got any worse

No probs, wandered along there the next morning

Surgery doors are locked, you have to speak into a telecom thing at the door, then they either electronically unlock it for you to come in or come to the door with whatever is required

spoke into the microphone, explained why I was there, who I was, dates of birth, address etc

receptionist came to the door with my appointment and bloods required cards for the phlebotomist (love that job description, what an ace word)

she passed them through the letterbox to me

hang on I said but she dissapeared quick, so I waited till she had got back to her desk and then used the telecom again

what now ? was the question I faced as an answer

Ive got to book an appointment with the COPD nurse , I reply

you cant do that here she says, you have to ring in to do that,

but Im here says I and the doctor said to do it now

no she says, thats not how we do it

nonplussed I gave up and walked home to sit waiting in a queue on the phone for another half hour , just to book what could of been booked while I was there

worlds gone mad (or Im too simple for it)
 

gingert76

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To be fair if that is the process then that is the process but also if she has to use a application/computer then she cant do that at the front door.

Im all for processes being followed so i do not see a problem with it but i may well be in a minority for sure
 

spanky

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My experiences with the NHS have convinced me that (in the most part) they have forgotten that the patient is in effect their customer. If your local surgery, hospital etc. was in competitive, business setting, I suspect many of them would be out of business in no time at all. The artificial world in which they function means they receive much the same rewards regardless of the 'customer experience' they deliver, which in turn means they tend to focus on process and rules, rather then how the patient gets treated. In fact I would go as far as to say that in some settings the patient is seen as a hinderance to the efficient running of the NHS, rather than its raison d'etre.

I am not in any way advocating any form of privatization of the NHS - that would be a disaster, but some form of re-focussing on the patient might be a good idea. I know of one hospital CEO that was appointed from outside of the NHS and tried to turn the trust around to be more patient focussed - at one feedback session the patient talked their carers through their experiences (the waiting, lack of care, lack of communication etc.) which reduced the carers to tears. Makes you think.
 

Zerkalo

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My sister tells me as a GP she gets a lot of people who just want to chat especially on house calls, if they have time for that then why not booking you in for this? I'll tell you why, bureaucracy.
 

mickthechippy

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To be fair if that is the process then that is the process but also if she has to use a application/computer then she cant do that at the front door.

Im all for processes being followed so i do not see a problem with it but i may well be in a minority for sure
she was back at her desk in front of the computer whilst I was talking to her through the intercom
 

Deejay8

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The NHS has dealt with Covid itself, brilliantly, and in very difficult circumstances, but it does seem to have been at the expense of most other care, to a greater or lesser extent. GP surgeries are definitely putting so many barriers in place to stop patients attending, that they give the impression that they don't want to deal with any patients. There are suddenly a lot of hurdles to jump to get an appointment. And it's putting people off making appointments. And it's often those appointments that detect the beginnings of serious illness.
 

dry nets

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At least someone answered the phone. Ours pick up and put straight back down. If you do get to speak to the receptionist, she ask what’s wrong and then she decides if you are worthy of an appointment. When I ring up now if she answers I say “hello can I make an appointment with Dr receptionist”.
 

John Step

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Some are very helpful. They are the ones awaiting to go on the special receptionist course on how to be rude.
The course includes the instructions on how to put up notices in reception such as the ones saying rudeness to staff will not be tolerated.
 

160642fishing

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Why should rudeness to staff be tolerated,some people just do not know how to be civil to anybody
 

Dave

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It's not a modern day thing ....

Many years ago, in fact 48 38 if I think right, I was helping a good friend of mine replace an engine in a car outside his house. He was one of the best mechanics I knew.
Anyway we didn't get finished until late so decided to have something to eat and a few bottles at his house. His missus made dinner, we sat, scoffed and drank until the early hours and I fell asleep on the sofa, still in my muckys and dirty, as you do.

The next morning I woke up with a proper pain in my stomach, so bad that I couldn't eat a fry-up, and it developed worse to the point where I threw up.
We had a job to go to and it didn't look like we were going to get there. The pain was worsening, the colour was draining from my face, and I said to Steve, you'd best run me home.
Now at the time he was disqualified from driving, mainly from speeding, but that didn't seem to stop him. My car was a stage 3 tuned 2.0l MK3 Cortina, a proper beast of a machine, so he jumped at the chance of driving it. We didn't get far when the pain got worse so we slung a left and headed for my GP's.

Once we got there I could hardly walk. He helped me out and to the reception were we asked to see a doctor.
The receptionist asked if we had an appointment.
Steve let go of me as I collapsed into a heap on the floor by then writhing in agony. He remonstrated with the receptionist and tried to explain I didn't have time to make an appointment and she could see I wasn't well. Nope, no appointment, no doctor was her stance.

Now Steve wasn't the sort of guy to walk over or give in and he went off down the corridor braying on all the doors demanding that any doctors should come out now. She was trying to tell us both to leave :)
Several GPs did come out and I was taken into a room, put on a couch, examined, and told to get to A&E immediately as I had what looked like a rupturing appendix.
Steve asked for an ambulance but because it was to a surgery he was told it would be classed as low priority.

So once again I was bundled in the car, by now chewing the seatbelt, Steve drove to the hospital like Colin McCrae on steroids, and as we got to the last main road to the hospital he caught up with an ambulance which saw something was amiss so gave us a blues and twos escort straight into the hospital A&E admissions bay.
It turned out to be a ruptured appendix but peritonitis hadn't developed luckily, so the next I knew was waking up a couple of ounces lighter in a ward :)
 
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ginger

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As somebody once said - 'Man (or person if you are PC!) the borders with doctor's receptionsts and nobody would get in.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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The Boss was a GP receptionist (today, I kid you not, called a Care Pathway Navigator) and even she rolls her eyes with some of the antics her successors get up to.

I know she was good at her job and respected as people are friendly with her when they meet in town.
 

warrington63

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A couple of years ago I went to reception desk to collect a prescription, one of the items on it ( pregabelin) had to be signed for as it had come under a controlled drug issue.
I got the prescription and asked for blood test results while I was there, I was told they couldnt give them to me ,citing some reason that I could be anyone.and that I will have to phone up for them.
I said that they had just given me a prescription with a controlled drug on it without asking for ID.
I was again told I would have to phone up., other people in the surgery could hear what I was saying, so I sat down in reception seating area , got my phone out and phoned the surgery for my results, the same receptionist answered, There were a couple of cheers when I waved to her holding my phone.
 

Pompous git

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Just had a cataract done {Sunday} and although painless it was extremely unpleasant, I suppose years ago people just went blind.

Anyway struggling to read and type so will knock posting on the head for a short while, don`t all cheer at once. I reckon I`m too
nice for you horrible lot anyway.

Back on topic I once sat in the doctors waiting room and the receptionist came out and handed a bloke a prescription and said `this
will soon bring your blood pressure down Mr Bloggs`. Hmm, not for them to go public, I would not have been bothered but I suspect
many would be.
 

Dave Spence

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Sorry to hear about your catatact mate. I hope you make a speedy recovery and be able to see a lot more bites.👍👍👍
 

John Step

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Just had a cataract done {Sunday} and although painless it was extremely unpleasant, I suppose years ago people just went blind.

Anyway struggling to read and type so will knock posting on the head for a short while, don`t all cheer at once. I reckon I`m too
nice for you horrible lot anyway.

Back on topic I once sat in the doctors waiting room and the receptionist came out and handed a bloke a prescription and said `this
will soon bring your blood pressure down Mr Bloggs`. Hmm, not for them to go public, I would not have been bothered but I suspect
many would be.
Hope you get on OK after your op.
Reminds of the Pharmacist when I wanted Germoloids for the farmer giles.

The chemist shop was a long one. One of those half a shop front jobs.
I asked for the product and she walked to the other end of the counter then shouted up the crowded shop " Do you want cream or suppositories ?"
To which everyone looked round at me.
 
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