The floods.

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,806
Funny how the latest “storm” is mainly up north and Scotland and it hasn’t been named. If it was down the south I wonder if it would be named a storm
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
65,981
Been blowing a right hooley here most of the day. Seen one tree down.
 

Flathead

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2018
Messages
920
Funny how the latest “storm” is mainly up north and Scotland and it hasn’t been named. If it was down the south I wonder if it would be named a storm
It has been named....at least unofficially as yet.

It is called ‘storm Ellen’ and has been warned about for days.....today seems to be the start of it.
 
Last edited:

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,806
It has been named....at least unofficially as yet.

It is called ‘storm Ellen’ and has been warned about for days.....today seems to be the start of it.
Like I said. Weather is bad up north. If this was down south. Would it of been named. As far as I know it’s has not been named official yet
The storm after Ellen has been named Francis. Still doesn’t mean anything yet.
 
Last edited:

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,806
@62tucker ....I was under the impression a storms designation/name was the same name whatever part of the country it hit? :rolleyes::geek:

Here’s the proof that it does count where in the country the effects of a “ storm” hits.
From the BBC

Factors the UK Met Office would take into account include the time of year - stronger winds in summer or autumn would have a greater impact as the trees are still in full leaf.

?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️Also the location - is the stormy weather hitting an area of high population which would again have an effect on more people? ?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️

It is also worth noting that the three agencies each cover distinct geographical areas and severe weather will not always affect all areas.

Whilst storms are often named due to wind strength, rain and snow will also be considered if impacts could lead to flooding or disruption.


Full statement
WHAT IS THE CRITERIA FOR NAMING A STORM?
A storm is named when it has the potential to trigger an amber/orange or red warning and have "substantial" impact. However, it starts to get a little tricky at this stage as the separate agencies have slightly different criteria when it comes to issuing a warning.

The UK Met Office warning system is based on potential impacts from severe weather and the likelihood of such events happening. Both Met Éireann and KMNI use a combination of numerical-based criteria and potential impact when deciding whether or not to issue a warning. For example, widespread wind gusts of up to 80mph in Ireland would warrant an orange warning from Met Éireann, whereas the UK Met Office would consider only the impacts of the same gusts before issuing an amber warning.

_110515882_metofficegovuk_xsmall.jpg
UKMO
UKMO warning matrix
Factors the UK Met Office would take into account include the time of year - stronger winds in summer or autumn would have a greater impact as the trees are still in full leaf. Also the location - is the stormy weather hitting an area of high population which would again have an effect on more people? It is also worth noting that the three agencies each cover distinct geographical areas and severe weather will not always affect all areas.

Whilst storms are often named due to wind strength, rain and snow will also be considered if impacts could lead to flooding or disruption.

HOW ARE STORM NAMES CHOSEN?
Each year, the three meteorological agencies ask members of the public for their favourite names and the list is compiled from these suggestions, reflecting the diversity across the different countries. Storms are named in alphabetical order and since the initiative started back in 2015 we have not gone further than K - Storm Katie, which hit the UK on Easter Monday 2016. So if your name starts with a letter towards the end of the alphabet it is highly unlikely ever to be used.
 

Total

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
13,563
@62tucker ....^^ All very nice mate! :D.......But means bugger all to where the storm name hits in the country....End of. ;)
 

mickthechippy

space cadet
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
16,176
with reference to the band Americas biggest hit

My conker tree blew down in the storm with no name,

its lying on the ground in the puddles caused by rain

my childhood conkering will never be same

and the toon got beaten by palace again., la la lah lah la la....................................................
 

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,806
with reference to the band Americas biggest hit

My conker tree blew down in the storm with no name,

its lying on the ground in the puddles caused by rain

my childhood conkering will never be same

and the toon got beaten by palace again., la la lah lah la la....................................................
Stop smoking weed. ?
 

Trogg

the bouncer
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2001
Messages
28,525
Here’s the proof that it does count where in the country the effects of a “ storm” hits.
From the BBC

Factors the UK Met Office would take into account include the time of year - stronger winds in summer or autumn would have a greater impact as the trees are still in full leaf.

?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️Also the location - is the stormy weather hitting an area of high population which would again have an effect on more people? ?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️?‍♂️

It is also worth noting that the three agencies each cover distinct geographical areas and severe weather will not always affect all areas.

Whilst storms are often named due to wind strength, rain and snow will also be considered if impacts could lead to flooding or disruption.


Full statement
WHAT IS THE CRITERIA FOR NAMING A STORM?
A storm is named when it has the potential to trigger an amber/orange or red warning and have "substantial" impact. However, it starts to get a little tricky at this stage as the separate agencies have slightly different criteria when it comes to issuing a warning.

The UK Met Office warning system is based on potential impacts from severe weather and the likelihood of such events happening. Both Met Éireann and KMNI use a combination of numerical-based criteria and potential impact when deciding whether or not to issue a warning. For example, widespread wind gusts of up to 80mph in Ireland would warrant an orange warning from Met Éireann, whereas the UK Met Office would consider only the impacts of the same gusts before issuing an amber warning.

_110515882_metofficegovuk_xsmall.jpg
UKMO
UKMO warning matrix
Factors the UK Met Office would take into account include the time of year - stronger winds in summer or autumn would have a greater impact as the trees are still in full leaf. Also the location - is the stormy weather hitting an area of high population which would again have an effect on more people? It is also worth noting that the three agencies each cover distinct geographical areas and severe weather will not always affect all areas.

Whilst storms are often named due to wind strength, rain and snow will also be considered if impacts could lead to flooding or disruption.

HOW ARE STORM NAMES CHOSEN?
Each year, the three meteorological agencies ask members of the public for their favourite names and the list is compiled from these suggestions, reflecting the diversity across the different countries. Storms are named in alphabetical order and since the initiative started back in 2015 we have not gone further than K - Storm Katie, which hit the UK on Easter Monday 2016. So if your name starts with a letter towards the end of the alphabet it is highly unlikely ever to be used.


Nope, you'll have to show me where it says that naming a storm matters upon where it hits, because that's what you were saying before posting this...if it was down south would it be named... yes just as it is named up north because the UK metoffice covers..the UK, Met Eireann covers Eire and KMNI covers Holland soooo i'm lost how this proves where in the country it matters as the storms are named before the make landfall..... they can only guess where it will hit don't forget that forecast is juts a posh word for guess, they see where it has tracked across the atlantic and make a best guess estimate at where it will go and what it will do once it gets to land.

They don't just sit in an office and wait for it to make landfall then say "oh, it's only hit Scotland so it doesn't matter about naming it.
Myself, i hate the fact we have once again adopted an American trend, and are now naming storms.
 

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,806
Nope, you'll have to show me where it says that naming a storm matters upon where it hits, because that's what you were saying before posting this...if it was down south would it be named... yes just as it is named up north because the UK metoffice covers..the UK, Met Eireann covers Eire and KMNI covers Holland soooo i'm lost how this proves where in the country it matters as the storms are named before the make landfall..... they can only guess where it will hit don't forget that forecast is juts a posh word for guess, they see where it has tracked across the atlantic and make a best guess estimate at where it will go and what it will do once it gets to land.

They don't just sit in an office and wait for it to make landfall then say "oh, it's only hit Scotland so it doesn't matter about naming it.
Myself, i hate the fact we have once again adopted an American trend, and are now naming storms.
Also the location - is the stormy weather hitting an area of high population which would again have an effect on more people?

I thought that what the above means. Unless I am reading it wrong. There’s loads of floods in Scotland today
 
Top