Testing

62tucker

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My phone has been going mad today with message of people off work due to
symptoms
someone they work with is off bad
Testing
Can’t get testing etc etc.
seems to me it talking off again in the north east and heard rumours of local lockdown in north east tomorrow or Friday
What doesn’t help is when I hear a lad who I use to work with who has always had 2 weeks off when his lass had covid in June is now off again as his 3 year old daughter has a runny nose. Also as his lass works in a care home she has done a test on whole family 3. And been to drive through for another 3 test incase different results or delayed results
 

lp1886

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My phone has been going mad today with message of people off work due to
symptoms
someone they work with is off bad
Testing
Can’t get testing etc etc.
seems to me it talking off again in the north east and heard rumours of local lockdown in north east tomorrow or Friday
What doesn’t help is when I hear a lad who I use to work with who has always had 2 weeks off when his lass had covid in June is now off again as his 3 year old daughter has a runny nose. Also as his lass works in a care home she has done a test on whole family 3. And been to drive through for another 3 test incase different results or delayed results
It could also be a lot of people being fully aware that they can’t get tested due to the extensive news coverage, and therefore taking advantage of the situation because the weathers nice this week. 😉
 

Lee Richards

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Can't see what relevance there is bringing professional sports people into this discussion really.
They are all tested at training sessions and before and after the events. Its all paid for by the club's, associations and governing bodies of the sport.
 

tipitinmick

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Went yesterday for a test as I'm going in hospital on Friday. The one down my throat made me gip but, I swear she didn't push it up my nose far enough and only did one nostril. I thought they did both ? Oh well, I've not heard anything today so, I guessing I must be negative. 😷
 

Wise Owl

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Ive heard through good authority the test doesn't test for a virus, it tests for fragmentation in DNA strands caused by a common cold through a process called amplification.
 

squimp

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Went yesterday for a test as I'm going in hospital on Friday. The one down my throat made me gip but, I swear she didn't push it up my nose far enough and only did one nostril. I thought they did both ? Oh well, I've not heard anything today so, I guessing I must be negative. 😷
I had a test 10 days ago; prior to a small op.

the throat one (which I was dreading) was okay but the nose one (relaxed about) was excruciatingly painful. Maybe because I have a broken nose ?
 

tipitinmick

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I had a test 10 days ago; prior to a small op.

the throat one (which I was dreading) was okay but the nose one (relaxed about) was excruciatingly painful. Maybe because I have a broken nose ?
If she had given me the big cotton bud I’d have certainly pushed it up my nose a bit further. It was hardly in my nostril. I hope she’s done it right. 🤔
 

squimp

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I reckon my nose swab went at least 4” up my nose. I started complaining after about half that and the nurse kept going and going and going. I was properly yelping by the time she had finished.
 

Dave

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Ive heard through good authority the test doesn't test for a virus, it tests for fragmentation in DNA strands caused by a common cold through a process called amplification.

Its called Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)


Infectious disease applications

PCR allows for rapid and highly specific diagnosis of infectious diseases, including those caused by bacteria or viruses.[27] PCR also permits identification of non-cultivatable or slow-growing microorganisms such as mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, or viruses from tissue culture assays and animal models. The basis for PCR diagnostic applications in microbiology is the detection of infectious agents and the discrimination of non-pathogenic from pathogenic strains by virtue of specific genes.[27][28]

Characterization and detection of infectious disease organisms have been revolutionized by PCR in the following ways:


  • The human immunodeficiency virus (or HIV), is a difficult target to find and eradicate. The earliest tests for infection relied on the presence of antibodies to the virus circulating in the bloodstream. However, antibodies don't appear until many weeks after infection, maternal antibodies mask the infection of a newborn, and therapeutic agents to fight the infection don't affect the antibodies. PCR tests have been developed that can detect as little as one viral genome among the DNA of over 50,000 host cells.[29] Infections can be detected earlier, donated blood can be screened directly for the virus, newborns can be immediately tested for infection, and the effects of antiviral treatments can be quantified.

  • Some disease organisms, such as that for tuberculosis, are difficult to sample from patients and slow to be grown in the laboratory. PCR-based tests have allowed detection of small numbers of disease organisms (both live or dead), in convenient samples. Detailed genetic analysis can also be used to detect antibiotic resistance, allowing immediate and effective therapy. The effects of therapy can also be immediately evaluated.

  • The spread of a disease organism through populations of domestic or wild animals can be monitored by PCR testing. In many cases, the appearance of new virulent sub-types can be detected and monitored. The sub-types of an organism that were responsible for earlier epidemics can also be determined by PCR analysis.

  • Viral DNA can be detected by PCR. The primers used must be specific to the targeted sequences in the DNA of a virus, and PCR can be used for diagnostic analyses or DNA sequencing of the viral genome. The high sensitivity of PCR permits virus detection soon after infection and even before the onset of disease.[27] Such early detection may give physicians a significant lead time in treatment. The amount of virus ("viral load") in a patient can also be quantified by PCR-based DNA quantitation techniques (see below). A variant of PCR (RT-PCR) is used for detecting viral RNA rather than DNA: in this test the enzyme reverse transcriptase is used to generate a DNA sequence which matches the viral RNA; this DNA is then amplified as per the usual PCR method. RT-PCR is widely used to detect the Sars-Cov-2 viral genome.[30]

  • Diseases such as pertussis (or whooping cough) are caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis. This bacteria is marked by a serious acute respiratory infection that affects various animals and humans and has led to the deaths of many young children. The pertussis toxin is a protein exotoxin that binds to cell receptors by two dimers and reacts with different cell types such as T lymphocytes which play a role in cell immunity.[31] PCR is an important testing tool that can detect sequences within the gene for the pertussis toxin. Because PCR has a high sensitivity for the toxin and a rapid turnaround time, it is very efficient for diagnosing pertussis when compared to culture.[32]

    Source: Polymerase chain reaction - Wikipedia
 

rudd

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Went yesterday for a test as I'm going in hospital on Friday. The one down my throat made me gip but, I swear she didn't push it up my nose far enough and only did one nostril. I thought they did both ? Oh well, I've not heard anything today so, I guessing I must be negative. 😷
She done it right then - thats how to do it.
 

genesis

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Silly big fat bitch from Chelmsford on the BBC news now admitting that she went for a test but didn't have any symptoms. Really I despair. It's muppets like her who are causing the surge in demand. If you know where she lives go and have a word.
 

Wise Owl

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Its called Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)


Infectious disease applications
PCR allows for rapid and highly specific diagnosis of infectious diseases, including those caused by bacteria or viruses.[27] PCR also permits identification of non-cultivatable or slow-growing microorganisms such as mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, or viruses from tissue culture assays and animal models. The basis for PCR diagnostic applications in microbiology is the detection of infectious agents and the discrimination of non-pathogenic from pathogenic strains by virtue of specific genes.[27][28]

Characterization and detection of infectious disease organisms have been revolutionized by PCR in the following ways:


  • The human immunodeficiency virus (or HIV), is a difficult target to find and eradicate. The earliest tests for infection relied on the presence of antibodies to the virus circulating in the bloodstream. However, antibodies don't appear until many weeks after infection, maternal antibodies mask the infection of a newborn, and therapeutic agents to fight the infection don't affect the antibodies. PCR tests have been developed that can detect as little as one viral genome among the DNA of over 50,000 host cells.[29] Infections can be detected earlier, donated blood can be screened directly for the virus, newborns can be immediately tested for infection, and the effects of antiviral treatments can be quantified.

  • Some disease organisms, such as that for tuberculosis, are difficult to sample from patients and slow to be grown in the laboratory. PCR-based tests have allowed detection of small numbers of disease organisms (both live or dead), in convenient samples. Detailed genetic analysis can also be used to detect antibiotic resistance, allowing immediate and effective therapy. The effects of therapy can also be immediately evaluated.

  • The spread of a disease organism through populations of domestic or wild animals can be monitored by PCR testing. In many cases, the appearance of new virulent sub-types can be detected and monitored. The sub-types of an organism that were responsible for earlier epidemics can also be determined by PCR analysis.

  • Viral DNA can be detected by PCR. The primers used must be specific to the targeted sequences in the DNA of a virus, and PCR can be used for diagnostic analyses or DNA sequencing of the viral genome. The high sensitivity of PCR permits virus detection soon after infection and even before the onset of disease.[27] Such early detection may give physicians a significant lead time in treatment. The amount of virus ("viral load") in a patient can also be quantified by PCR-based DNA quantitation techniques (see below). A variant of PCR (RT-PCR) is used for detecting viral RNA rather than DNA: in this test the enzyme reverse transcriptase is used to generate a DNA sequence which matches the viral RNA; this DNA is then amplified as per the usual PCR method. RT-PCR is widely used to detect the Sars-Cov-2 viral genome.[30]

  • Diseases such as pertussis (or whooping cough) are caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis. This bacteria is marked by a serious acute respiratory infection that affects various animals and humans and has led to the deaths of many young children. The pertussis toxin is a protein exotoxin that binds to cell receptors by two dimers and reacts with different cell types such as T lymphocytes which play a role in cell immunity.[31] PCR is an important testing tool that can detect sequences within the gene for the pertussis toxin. Because PCR has a high sensitivity for the toxin and a rapid turnaround time, it is very efficient for diagnosing pertussis when compared to culture.[32]

    Source: Polymerase chain reaction - Wikipedia
I was gonna post that but don’t want the antis thinking I’m having a dig mate 👍
 

Wise Owl

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Silly big fat bitch from Chelmsford on the BBC news now admitting that she went for a test but didn't have any symptoms. Really I despair. It's muppets like her who are causing the surge in demand. If you know where she lives go and have a word.
I know someone who’s been for 4, it’s as if he is hoping he’s had it, mind you he is a hypochondriac who’s had everything from cubic foot to galloping gourmet.
 

Zerkalo

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My niece came back clear too, hopefully she hasn't just 'pulled a sicky' but glad anyway. :rolleyes:
 

Dave

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This is the advice on the Government's website:

Get a free coronavirus test
You can get a free test (swab test) to check if you have coronavirus now.

The test is normally only for people who have symptoms of coronavirus – whether that’s you, or someone you live with.

The main symptoms of coronavirus are:

  • high temperature
  • new, continuous cough
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste
If you live, work or study in an area where there is a coronavirus outbreak, you can get a test even if you do not have symptoms.

This test can tell you if you have coronavirus at the time the swab sample is taken. It is called an antigen test. The test to tell if you’ve ever had coronavirus (antibody test) is not available yet.



Crucial point highlighted in red
 

tipitinmick

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She done it right then - thats how to do it.
Is it 👍 Well, if that’s a proper test then no one should fear it. I just thought rudd that she hadn’t gone far enough up my nostril. I think I’ve seen too many YouTube videos. 🙄
 

tipitinmick

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M
I know someone who’s been for 4, it’s as if he is hoping he’s had it, mind you he is a hypochondriac who’s had everything from cubic foot to galloping gourmet.
Maybe after the first two they should charge ? But, then again, folk would stop going I guess. 🙄
 

mickthechippy

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Is it 👍 Well, if that’s a proper test then no one should fear it. I just thought rudd that she hadn’t gone far enough up my nostril. I think I’ve seen too many YouTube videos. 🙄
Im wondering about your reaction to the prostate test now !
 
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