Tench and rudd

Fartacus

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What happens to the summer fish such as tench and rudd??
They surely can't hibernate or the pike would have a field day and have easy pickings...
 

Sam Vimes

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They don't hibernate as such, but they do become much less active. Being less active means they don't need to eat as much. Both are caught in the depths of winter, but the chances of catching them reduces significantly.
 

tyne angler

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i got a rud fishing the feeder in 14foot of water on saturday not what i expected but they must feed as you say they cant just hibernate it could just be us and the way we fish in winter btw the rud is up there with my favourite fish along with dace and roach
 

Silverfisher

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Good question. I think tench could basically hibernate as there doesnt tend to be big numbers of them in most places so they could hide away quite easily. Rudd can obviously be more numerous and where there are a lot of them its not unusual to catch a few in the winter.

It’s an even more valid question with bleak though. They can go from plague proportions in the warmer months to only occasional captures in the cold. On some waters you could even legitimately catch one a chuck all day in mid summer if that way inclined then not get a single one from the same swim in mid winter.
 

corkycat

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I've often wondered that myself, but I have noticed that when I have had tench in my keepnet - if it's on a soft bottom - they like to embed themselves in the mud and lie doggo. Perhaps that's what they do for much of the winter.
 

Somersetlad

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On my local canal, last saturday I had 2 3lb tench, the guy one peg downstream had one that was an easy 5 (lucky b******), yesterday on a different stretch I had a 1lb4 rudd, while one of the match boys had a 2lb rudd. I think it's relatively mild weather and a lot of coloured water coming in from the river, the canal has a fairly steady flow all the time, today after a frost i couldn't buy a bite. This time of the year a few decent tench and rudd always turn up, usually to single red maggot - squeaky bum time on a 4m whip, but I'm not sure I'd try to target them, they're just a nice bonus. As to the bleak, sometimes there's millions of them, other times there non-existant. TBH if I understood it, I'd loose interest pretty quickly.
 

Zerkalo

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Tench of a reasonable size are my favourite fish so I can't wait for Spring so I can fish a new Tench venue.
 

The Landlord

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I've often wondered that myself, but I have noticed that when I have had tench in my keepnet - if it's on a soft bottom - they like to embed themselves in the mud and lie doggo. Perhaps that's what they do for much of the winter.
I was always told that about tench in the winter....that they more or less bury themselves in the mud. Dunno how somebody found out.
 

Fartacus

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If the tench lay half buried then the pike would come along and eat them surely,
an easy meal for the predators...
 

TrickyD

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I used to fish a lake which, in the summer, was chock a block with small (2-12 oz) carp, you couldn't help but catch them, 1 a chuck. Come October - November onwards there was no sigh of them, you could catch bigger carp 4lbs and up, but never a small one, God knows what happened to them. Can't remember getting anything else, just carp.
 

Me and my lad

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We used to fish a small lake mablerhorpe way way and one hard winter it was frozen for an age. The owner would let us break the ice and on one occassion allowed us to take the boat out. The carp and tench could be seen half buried in the mud, we even lifted a tench up with the oar as it was so camatose.
 

Silverfisher

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That would explain how lakes can get so hard in the winter. I have always wondered how a lake so full of fish in spring, summer and autumn can appear near empty in the winter when the fish can't go anywhere, especially on most lakes where they are fairly uniform so have no obvious spots for them to school up. Is easier to imagine on rivers as there are often lots on different spots so some are likely more favourable to them at different times of year. That said it's generally easier to get fish feeding on rivers as they have to keep their energy levels up to deal with the current so need to feed more which is obviously not the case on lakes.
 
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