Teachers Assessing Their Pupils

Neil ofthe nene

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Apologies in advance but the idea of teachers assessing their own pupil's grades seems like a bad idea to me. Will any teacher actually fail any pupil they have taught? Will there not be a temptation to over grade and so make themselves look good? Admittedly not all teachers but surely some will be tempted.

Or am I just an old cynic?
 

Silver fan 82

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Apologies in advance but the idea of teachers assessing their own pupil's grades seems like a bad idea to me. Will any teacher actually fail any pupil they have taught? Will there not be a temptation to over grade and so make themselves look good? Admittedly not all teachers but surely some will be tempted.

Or am I just an old cynic?
I agree with you Neil. Is it really a fair assessment of the individual pupils ability? Would they have got better results if they had sat an exam?
I'm glad I'm not at school having to go through it at the moment.
 

Zerkalo

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There's some teachers I had where this would have been the case, other teaches would have failed me, one asked me on the day of my I.T. exam, "Why are you even here?". I got a B (A Level). But had the teacher marked me I would have got less. Either way it wouldn't have been an accurate representation so feel a bit sorry for those having to go through this.
 

Silver fan 82

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There's some teachers I had where this would have been the case, other teaches would have failed me, one asked me on the day of my I.T. exam, "Why are you even here?". I got a B (A Level). But had the teacher marked me I would have got less. Either way it wouldn't have been an accurate representation so feel a bit sorry for those having to go through this.
I'm not sure how it usually works when an exam is sat? I presume an outside exam board who is impartial marks the exams based on some kind of criteria? If this is the case how are the teachers qualified to do this?
 

Zerkalo

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I'm not sure how it usually works when an exam is sat? I presume an outside exam board who is impartial marks the exams based on some kind of criteria? If this is the case how are the teachers qualified to do this?
Not sure exactly how it is going to work and if exams are going to be sat at all now and teachers just give a grade to each pupil?
 

Me and my lad

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In Primary school we test throughout the year, every term. Even this term when we go back to gain a baseline. I have known children fail all year, yet pass their SAT'S exams and others fly all year only for nerves to get the better of them andt they miss out. In subjects that are not tested we will have to provide evidence I.e books, observations, verbal discussions and previous assessments. Let teachers get on with it.
 

Yuccaman

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We're not exactly sure yet as teachers who are doing it... it'll be nice when they tell us.

So...firstly, it's a brilliant swerve by the government who now pass all blame from themselves and Ofqual onto teachers. That said, I do genuinely think it is the best option.

Will every teacher, and every school college be honest? Probably not. Will the vast, vast majority? Yes.

Strange as it may seem, the over-riding thing that most teachers I have worked with over 20 years in the profession want is that pupils get what they deserve. If it means they get a 9 (A top A* in old money), they should. If they should get a U, they should.

I find a lot of what has been put into the public domain a bit weird today. I find it odd that they have said that there won't be tests in exam halls... well why not? The answer to that is because Gavin and Boris said there would be no exams. I now have to motivate my Year 11s for probably 11 more school weeks, working towards....? I've got a fair idea of where most are heading, but definitely need to narrow things down - the pupils didn't have mock exams at the end of Year 10 because of Lockdown, did some in October, but not 'properly' as we were limited by social distancing, and then haven't done any since. One of the first things I want to do when we get back is to find out where my pupils are.

Anyway, enough of the methods, we'll get there. I have coursework, homework, a mock, and I will have more, etc.

Grade inflation. I explained this last summer, I'll explain it now, and I'm sure that I will again.

In a good year, my predictions are about 70% accurate. Let's say in my class I have 10 students who I think are likely to get a Grade 6 (B). An awful lot of what you are doing when teaching is trying to push students towards the Grade boundaries, either just over one, or up to the next. Of those I can be pretty certain with perhaps 4. They look slap bang in the middle. I might have 2 on effectively a 6+. Definitely a 6, and with luck and a fair wind, a 7. On the flipside, I have 4 at 6- who I think should get a 6, but are going to be close.

So predicted grade. In any given year, 1 of those 2 on 6+ might get a 7, or neither of them might. Maybe even both. Evidentially, they haven't shown it, so I predict a 6.

Now I've got 4 who are pretty certain to get a 6. So I predict them that. In any year, one of them will either bomb or ace the exam and get a 5 or 7. I don't know which one it will be, or whether they'll sink or fly. All I can do is predict what the evidence says.

Then the 4 on 6-. I know perfectly well that we're talking fine margins here. 2 of them will probably get the grade by 0.5%, 2 of them will miss it by maybe 0.5 or 0.25%. I have no idea who it will be. My evidence says that they should get the 6, so that's the only place I can go. My only other option is to literally pick 2 of the 4 names out of a hat and give them a 5. How happy would you be if I did that to your child?

The only certainty comes from doing exams, and this year, that isn't an option. If I take our Year 11s, some didn't have to self-isolate last term and had face to face teaching all the way through. The worst case was someone missing 8 weeks of school due to having to self-isolate repeatedly purely because luck of the draw had them sat near someone who tests positive. Some pupils have their own laptop to have accessed everything for the last 6 weeks, others might have 1 phone between 5 siblings to access their lessons.

Exams aren't an option this year, so the least worst option is to trust me, trust teachers. There is going to be some moderation, we don't know what yet, but there are certainly going to be spot checks so that rogue teachers aren't taking the proverbial.

But, children are not machines. They have emotions, they have good and bad days, they work their butts off at the last minute, someone elses mum dies. You cannot predict with 100% accuracy. Without blowing my own trumpet too much, I've been teaching 20 years, I'm head of department, I have won 2 teaching awards in the last few years, I've marked both GCSE and A-Levels for one of the exam boards since 2005.

And in a good year, my predictions are 70% accurate.
 
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Silverfisher

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I do feel so sorry for students of all ages at the moment. Not only are their futures being messed about with they are missing out on some of the best years of their lives as well.
 

DevonDangler

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My 18 year old daughter is cock-a-hoop that she hasn’t got to sit an English exam this year after failing her GCSE for the last two years. She goes to pieces in an exam situation so hopefully her course work will get her the pass she needs. If she fails this year I’m kicking her arse, although I think her mum will be first in the queue to do any kicking 😢
 

emmaemma

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In the grand scheme of things, it is probably the best thing to do. Whether it matters what grades they get I wouldn't know. The cream will rise to the top anyway and the shirkers will get found out in later life.
But I agree with Silverfisher, they are missing out on some of the best years of their lives regardless due to the pandemic.....
 

Yuccaman

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I do feel so sorry for students of all ages at the moment. Not only are their futures being messed about with they are missing out on some of the best years of their lives as well.
I agree entirely. My children are in Year 11 and 12 respectively. I think back to what I was doing when I was 16/17, and it wasn't sitting watching the Repair Shop with my parents...
 

Silverfisher

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I agree entirely. My children are in Year 11 and 12 respectively. I think back to what I was doing when I was 16/17, and it wasn't sitting watching the Repair Shop with my parents...
Yeah I think it's the GCSE to degree age that it's worst for from the life experience and future prospects points of view. Hopefully for the actual children they'll have time to recover it.
 

Dave

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We're living in extraordinary times at the moment
 

Silverfisher

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We're living in extraordinary times at the moment
Makes you realise doesn't it how good we had it between say mid June and end of October last year compared to the first lockdown and the 4 months we've had since the start of the November lockdown. Thinking back the restrictions through the summer and early autumn were nothing really.
 

G0zzer2

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It's a sobering thought that if Einstein were to take a Maths exam now he would undoubtedly fail...because his methods of working would be different to those now taught! So the teachers would have to give him a low mark (probably Zero).
 

Me and my lad

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Let’s hope they can spell....... 😀😀
Or don't have sausage fingers to use on keyboards. Give me a fountain pen over a keyboard any day. I recall writing my first set of school reports in pen, I had one spelling mistake. The following year it was computer based. 112 mistakes! I still hold the record. :ROFLMAO:
 

Dave Spence

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I was chatting with my missus about this only this morning and we agreed that certain colleagues of ours would inflate grades for their own ego. The vast majority of teachers will be professional imho and will grade what the student deserves. However, if a student is border line 4/5 and has worked his/her socks off it would be very tempting to give the 5, whereas a student in the same position who has slacked all year would be given a 4. You could say, this is what they deserve rather than what they would have attained in an exam.
 

Keith Sparky

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I was chatting with my missus about this only this morning and we agreed that certain colleagues of ours would inflate grades for their own ego. The vast majority of teachers will be professional imho and will grade what the student deserves. However, if a student is border line 4/5 and has worked his/her socks off it would be very tempting to give the 5, whereas a student in the same position who has slacked all year would be given a 4. You could say, this is what they deserve rather than what they would have attained in an exam.
Some good thoughts but don't mix effort with real ability......a slacker all year can easily be a bright kid who coasts then produces the goods when underthe pressure of exams whereas the hard worker may have to work really hard all year just to be average
 

Dave Spence

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Some good thoughts but don't mix effort with real ability......a slacker all year can easily be a bright kid who coasts then produces the goods when underthe pressure of exams whereas the hard worker may have to work really hard all year just to be average
I totally agree mate, I was just making the observation that some teachers would reward effort that an exam assessment would not necessarily show.
 
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