Stop watch or other when feeder fishing

Line Clip

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I know its the done thing to use a stop watch by the Top feeder anglers, when match fishing or even maybe pleasure feeder fishing,
, I don't quite get the logic behind it. and how to use the time on the watch to my advantage to catch more fish.
Can someone who understands the full logic and benefits of this tactic enlighten me please , as I want to become a better feeder angler.
DUMMY MATCH SITUATION.
The match for instance, First cast hit clip, wait for bite, NOTHING 12 mins later bite ,first fish, Set watch again, wait, next bite comes 19 mins later.
Set watch again, next bite, 4 mins later, Then sit for 30 mins NO BITES AT ALL AND NO LINERS.
So what to do next ?
What help was the stop watch ?
Is the time calculated over a longer period ?
Does the info from the watch when fully understood, count for CARP and BREAM. ?
Is this used just on big waters, would it be used on a commercial with any benefits .
Steve and Phil Ringer and many others use the TIMER for there feeder fishing so I am in no doubt that it works,
I just need to understand it, Thanks sorry to go on.
 

gingert76

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plenty of videos and features online explaining why but only useful if you fish a venue regularly for spotting trends, whether that be bites on certain baits being faster, bite times during the day, bites at different distances etc, all about trying to identify and spotting patterns to make you more efficient at the end of the day.

only useful if you can identify a trend on a venue over lots of trips, i.e. Ringer @ Boddington Res, he knows the trend for how quickly he should get bites, at what distance and on what baits/colours of bait and what time of day he can expect more/quicker bites as trends spotted form fishing it lots of times, doesnt mean its always 100% though but can be useful for a guide
 

Line Clip

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plenty of videos and features online explaining why but only useful if you fish a venue regularly for spotting trends, whether that be bites on certain baits being faster, bite times during the day, bites at different distances etc, all about trying to identify and spotting patterns to make you more efficient at the end of the day
It was suggested on a video that the time it takes from one bite to the next, could be when the fish spook, from one being caught, to them regrouping back into the feed area . Mind bogging but on the same hand interesting.
 

tipitinmick

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If you fish a venue where the fish are relatively constant in their feeding habits then a stopwatch can save you time. I’ve tried on places like Southfield reservoir but, on there the fish drift in and out of your swim chose what you do.
 

gingert76

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that could be one things for sure, hence why its about spotting those trends if you can, can be lots of use cases and prob some i have not even considered
 

genesis

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If you fish a venue where the fish are relatively constant in their feeding habits then a stopwatch can save you time. I’ve tried on places like Southfield reservoir but, on there the fish drift in and out of your swim chose what you do.
Always found on Southfield if you don't get a bite or twitch within five minutes then best to recast. The best fishing I have had there is with instant bites.
 

smiffy

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Timing is ok but it’s an instinct thing most of the time. ”Up top” you should know exactly how often and how much you should be feeding. I used to time at the start of a match to get feed out,if I knew the water well, but after that the fish, hopefully dictate things. One motto worth sticking to is “ fish feeder,think waggler” especially on rivers. Many anglers start off a session properly but a half hour without a bite and it goes out the window.
 

Line Clip

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If you fish a venue where the fish are relatively constant in their feeding habits then a stopwatch can save you time. I’ve tried on places like Southfield reservoir but, on there the fish drift in and out of your swim chose what you do.
So do you think its a thing left to the top boys, for who myself don't fish against ( I WISH ):)
 

tipitinmick

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Always found on Southfield if you don't get a bite or twitch within five minutes then best to recast. The best fishing I have had there is with instant bites.
Sorry Andy, I was talking more bream. What I meant was the bream move in and out of your peg. The skimmers and roach ( if the bloody cormorants haven’t eaten them all ) are there pretty much all day long.
 

Nicky Dodds

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Sorry Andy, I was talking more bream. What I meant was the bream move in and out of your peg. The skimmers and roach ( if the bloody cormorants haven’t eaten them all ) are there pretty much
Southfield changes all the time. Sometimes you'd think there was nothing but bream in there and they hit the feeder on impact. Sometimes you get bitted out. Craig is on peg 45 as we speak and is still waiting for his first bite. Normal for this time of year. You can sometimes land on ones nose first cast but more often it's 2.30 onwards you're expecting a visit and if you're lucky you might get two.
 

Stewie74

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I use a stopwatch, whether match or pleasure fishing, the main reason being if I’ve decided on 10 minute casts (for example) to start with, I know when it’s time to recast.

When I started using a stopwatch I found a large discrepancy between my guess at 10 minutes and an actual 10 minutes.
 

Line Clip

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Southfield changes all the time. Sometimes you'd think there was nothing but bream in there and they hit the feeder on impact. Sometimes you get bitted out. Craig is on peg 45 as we speak and is still waiting for his first bite. Normal for this time of year. You can sometimes land on ones nose first cast but more often it's 2.30 onwards you're expecting a visit and if you're lucky you might get two.
Well he has just entered the zone, so I hope the tip goes round for him soon, good luck. Must be pretty bleak at Southfield right now.
 

Marker50

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I use a stopwatch, whether match or pleasure fishing, the main reason being if I’ve decided on 10 minute casts (for example) to start with, I know when it’s time to recast.

When I started using a stopwatch I found a large discrepancy between my guess at 10 minutes and an actual 10 minutes.
Same here.I was way out.
 

Line Clip

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I use a stopwatch, whether match or pleasure fishing, the main reason being if I’ve decided on 10 minute casts (for example) to start with, I know when it’s time to recast.

When I started using a stopwatch I found a large discrepancy between my guess at 10 minutes and an actual 10 minutes.
Yes I do that using my wrist watch, when fishing Matches, but I change casting times depending on bite rate, just thought a stop watch would fine tune the situation
 

Zerkalo

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I should try this and see if it makes a difference to my fishing, though I always hope for a red letter day I can see it making a difference on days where you have to time your casts and wait for bites. I usually do it the other way round when I photograph every fish, I can look at the time of the photo when I get home lol. And thinking back to a red letter day I had 35 Bream in 7 hours at my local Bream venue, so I can calculate from that a fish every 12 minutes, my kind of fishing! :D
 
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