Stick float rod Daiwa Matchwinner 13' Stick

Tomdubs1

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Hi guys,

I'm looking at getting a stick float rod for general trotting river work for fishing the pin. Had my eye on a few of the older daiwa rods as finding a spliced tip nowadays is proving difficult without spending a shed load of cash.

Has anyone ever owned or know anything of the Daiwa Matchwinner 13ft Stick rod (TDSM13S). has carbon weave finish with dark purple eye whipping and a dark pink/purple butt section. Or even a shakespeare 14ft flavia rod?

Looking for something with a nice fast action but soft and tippy enough not to bump grayling when fishing the chalk streams.

I've already contacted daiwa as i have seen others do on the forum but I am awaiting a reply currently.

Any help/recommendations would be great.

Cheers,
Tom.
 

Sam Vimes

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The TDSM13S is a Team Daiwa Matchlite, not a Matchwinner. Unlike the TPM13S (original Tom Pickering Matchwinner) or the MW-S M130S (Tom Pickering Matchwinner-S), I've never used a Matchlite. If it's remotely similar to either spliced tip Matchwinner, it should be fine for grayling except at the more extreme of trotting ranges.
 

trotter2

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Not tried that rod but if its anything like the amorphous coil it will be OK for trotting a delicate stick float.
Probably not as light, balanced and thin as a modern rod mind. But it will be fine for what you want.
 

Tomdubs1

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Cheers for the input guys, really appreciate your knowledge.

How do you think it would handle heaver avons and domed topped sticks on rivers like the itchen and test? Ideally, i want something with a soft enough tip thats forgiving enough not to bump too many fish. But also want to be able to handle decent chub if I was to hook one. In terms of lines I was hoping to use up to a 4.4lb but from what you guys have said i feel this might be pushing the rod to its limit?

If there's better rods out there then I'm all ears to your suggestions for a fast actioned trotting rod.
 

adriang

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Potential alternative could be a Mach 2 Boron, they seem to go for 50-60 on eBay, there is one listed now that has the original bag and tube.

I used one of mine over the summer while my microlite was having a new handle fitted. I had a pleasant reminder on how good they are, lovely fast pickup and tippy. Only potential downside is the handle is a little long.
 

Tomdubs1

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I used to have a 12ft microlite (until it was stolen) which I really enjoyed using for silvers. From what I can remember it was a great rod with a soft through action, but I don't remember it being a very powerful rod? Would have thought the Titans/avengers were more designed for river trotting?
 

squimp

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My understanding of graying trotting is that the big issue is stopping them falling off the hook, rather than hitting the bites in the first place.

To that end I wouldn’t choose a spliced tip rod; rather something slightly softer with a more forgiving action .

As the previous poster has just said, if you are now talking big floats and chub then again I’d steer away from a light stick float rod.
 

adriang

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I used to have a 12ft microlite (until it was stolen) which I really enjoyed using for silvers. From what I can remember it was a great rod with a soft through action, but I don't remember it being a very powerful rod? Would have thought the Titans/avengers were more designed for river trotting?
I've got a pair of them, one 12 and one 13ft. They are very tippy, and hooking into something larger probably looks more dramatic than it really is. But, its not the rod for heavier 'top and bottom' work. I do use it for 'lighter' Avon work, on the upper Bristol Avon and Thames, but the comments about needing something 'heavier' I would agree with.
 

nejohn

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The Matchlite is similar in action to the AWM and Conny it is just lower spec so is a little heavier and not as well balanced also the action is not quite as crisp as the higher spec rods but they can be picked up for much less money than the AWM or Conny and will be fine for what you want, I would steer clear of the flavia my mate had one back in the day and he thought it was generally a step down from other spliced tip rods of the time and the action was nowhere near as fast as the matchlite. Others you could possibly try could be a Leeda 7000 or 8000 spliced tip these were extremely good rods and can often be found for very little cash also look at older Tri-cast spliced tips or Harrison GTi
 

trotter2

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or a 13ft John Allerton or a Harrison GTi or you go down the second hand route as the OP is trying to do
You would also know those two off the shelf rods are seriously in need of a blank revamp to compare to with the likes of the browning.?
 

nejohn

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To be fair though the Browning is a lump more to buy than either the Allerton or the GTi but yes they could do with an update. However in 13ft lengths they are both still very capable rods if the action is to your liking, neither of them are exactly heavy weights I think the tri-cast tips the scales at a tad over 140 grms and I would think a GTi is similar depending on handle spec etc, the tri-cast is also nicely balanced and probably a bit more tippy than others so for the right person could still be a better buy than any of the competition
 

Sam Vimes

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To be fair though the Browning is a lump more to buy than either the Allerton or the GTi but yes they could do with an update. However in 13ft lengths they are both still very capable rods if the action is to your liking, neither of them are exactly heavy weights I think the tri-cast tips the scales at a tad over 140 grms and I would think a GTi is similar depending on handle spec etc, the tri-cast is also nicely balanced and probably a bit more tippy than others so for the right person could still be a better buy than any of the competition

The Tri-Cast isn't that light, but neither is the spliced tip Sphere. The splice and extra six inches adds 18g over the 13' Sphere Waggler which is 144g. The spliced tip on the Tri-Cast adds 6g over the corresponding hollow tipped rod. Though I've not got one to weigh now, I'd be pretty surprised if a Harrison GTi spliced tip was less than 180g.

13' Tri-Cast Allerton (spliced tip) ---------------------------- 162g
13'6" Browning Sphere Spliced Tip River ------------------- 162g
13' Daiwa Tom Pickering Matchwinner (TPM13S) ---------- 190g
13' Daiwa Tom Pickering Matchwinner-S (MW-S M130S) -- 200g

For comparison, the following are all 13' hollow tipped rods.

Browning Sphere Match --------------------------- 144g
Drennan Acolyte Ultra ----------------------------- 146g
Drennan Acolyte Plus ------------------------------ 150g
Tri-Cast Allerton Waggler -------------------------- 156g
Maver Matchwinner Liquid Crystal ---------------- 177g
Normark Microlight II ------------------------------ 177g
Normark Titan II ----------------------------------- 178g
Shimano Speedcast ------------------------------- 193g
Daiwa (Tom Pickering) Matchwinner-S Waggler - 195g
Daiwa (Tom Pickering Matchwinner Waggler ----- 195g
Daiwa Air AGS ------------------------------------- 205g
Shimano Aerocast --------------------------------- 219g
 

nejohn

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I take the above on board however still at 162 grms the tri-cast is not exactly a heavy weight , I would think the GTi would be a similar weight, I am only basing this assumption on a 13ft Century excalibar spliced tip blank I built up earlier this year and that weighed about 164 grams fully built, so I was assuming the GTi blank is of a similar vintage and quality so is going to be around about the same weight. Personally I don't mind sacrificing a few grams in weight to get an action that I am happy with, for me it is no good having the lightest slimmest rod in the world if the action isn't right for you or its not suited to the job in hand. For me a good stick float rod is a combination of a action, weight, balance and comfort as you will be holding it all day so if one of those is not good for you then the rod is not going to be right for you
 

trotter2

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The Harrison gti 14ft is 7 oz thats nearly 200g thats not light for a modern rod by any imagination.
To put things in persepect a 17ft acolyte is 198g.
 

nejohn

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I won't argue that point as I have not held a GTi for many years, as I said I was basing it on a comparison with the excaliber spliced tip of a similar vintage that I do know weighs 164 grms fitted with single leg guides cork/duplon handle and Fuji screw down reel seat.
 

trotter2

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The century excalibur weight 6 oz I had one back in the early 80s it was advertised as the lightest match rod in the world at that time
But it was sold either a blank of a part built which meant it had the handle fitted ,no rings on.
The advertised weight was blank weight not finished rod. Nejohn I don't know we're you get your readings from but I would suggest a new set of kitchen scales.
And it came in two versions the first version was a hollow tip waggler rod later the spliced tip came on the market which is a rare rod.
The spliced tip would have been slightly heavier.
 
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