Snaggy swims and high tech lines

OldTaff

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Observation from yesterday

I’ve been using Guru n-gauge in 0.19 as hooklength line for about 6 months with no issues, fishing the bomb yesterday and had 3 break offs when a fish ran me into submerged snags (trees). Literally the second it got to a snag the line parted and I lost the hook.

When I ran out of hooklengths I’d tied at home I made one up quickly from a length of mainline which is 7lb Drennan feeder - still got dragged into the snags on three occasions but on two of those I got the fish back out and onto the bank, third time I had no chance.

The carp are much more lively, determined and heading for the snags far more than over the colder months.

Are the high tech lines more fragile / less abrasion resistant than the cheaper mono lines used on the reel?


From tomorrow I’ll move around the lake a bit further to avoid the snag areas but should I now reconsider my hooklength material and just use Drennan as per the reel?

What do others do in snaggy swims?
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Yers high tech lines are more fragile which is why they are generally not used as reel lines.

As for snaggy swims, I don't fish them or I don't fish close to the snags. I may get more bites close to the snag but that is pointless if all the fish get lost in the snag.
 

dave brittain 1

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Feed short of the snags and they'll come to the feed. Then it's a case of hook and hold and having the kit and confidence to do it. It wouldn't be the first time I've resorted to 10lb Maxima to 0.24 hook length and a strong carp hook, however when pleasure fishing I avoid pegs like this at all cost.

If you have to go tight to the snags you've lost the battle before it's started, however some carry on regardless and then complain about how many fish they've lost.
 

OldTaff

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FBAECEEB-ED29-4008-B320-8A37F6780C4B.jpeg
My problem is the pair of fallen trees to my right and another to my left

Even rocking up at 5:30 on a Saturday morning I can’t beat the overnight bivvy crews to the other accessible pegs, far bank still out of reach due to another fallen tree (will get chainsaw on it at some point). Trees to the right also knacker the next swim along

1718B1C2-74BE-466E-A953-D42DB6887962.jpeg

It’s fish these swims or not fish at all :cry:
 

DOGDACE

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I am with Dave Brittain on this. One venue I fish is full of snags and that is were the better carp live and I use the same gear ; 10lb maxima main line and 0.24 hooklength with an eyed hook tied like a spade end.
 

Silver fan 82

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All depends on how big the fish are. I will usually use a mono or supple braid hooklink.
If your fishing snags you want to give yourself a fighting chance of getting them out.
Big, strong hooks, strong line and a decent, strong rod.
 

OldTaff

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Need to seriously rethink what I’m doing on this water - no point catching if you can’t land them but I don’t want to go OTT with gear

Needs a work party but that will be a couple of months away when the water levels drop and depends on whether I can get another 2 or 3 blokes together
 

satinet

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Proper snag that!

Definitely would use a strong line like sensor/Maxima. Guess the problem is fish can always go sideways to some extent no matter how strong your grear is.
 

Robwooly

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I've said all along that modern hooklength lines are pretty snag brittle if there is such a term, glad I'm not alone on this. Re that swim good luck on that one hit and hold isn't a guarantee either by the looks. Remember the old days fishing hooklengths like drennan double strength? Whilst it wasn't double the strength you could almost bring a fish in through a swim consisting of razor blades it was so tolerant of abrasion.

I've always found with swims that are snag fests that anything on the line is bad, so if using a lead make sure it's free running and if any shot on the line make sure it comes off easily, squeeze it gently to the point off falling off of it's own accord. Sink the rod when playing fish etc etc. I've found in swims like that when freelining the line doesn't break as there's nothing to snag on, it's amazing what you can get in when freelining but whilst that isn't always an option minimilising any pinchpoints is a good lesson to take from it. Main lines seem to continue this abrasion resistance at the expense of diameter, I think we read too much into diameter after all the lines we were using yesteryear still worked a treat,

I've found drennan floatfish to have abrasion resistance in abundance and it's worth compromising diameter for toughness in such scenarios.
 

dave brittain 1

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Need to seriously rethink what I’m doing on this water - no point catching if you can’t land them but I don’t want to go OTT with gear

Needs a work party but that will be a couple of months away when the water levels drop and depends on whether I can get another 2 or 3 blokes together
Looking at the pictures shown, if the rod in the rest is your fishing position you need to reposition yourself so that you can apply maximum leverage as soon as the tip goes around, with the rod tip low as possible, close to the water, applying pressure in-between the the 8 and 9-0-clock position you should be able to hold the fish and stop it in it's tracks with the right set up, (see blue line rod position with fish on).

Ref the picture note the rod positions at set up and where IMO you should be feeding and casting to give you a very good chance of getting any fish out.

The inside line with the red feed area is one natural patrol area between the margin and the trees the other red feed circle level with the tree is where fish in open water will patrol when cruising/coming to the tree for shade.

The orange feed area is as close as I would go in front of the tree and where I would cast to noting that going closer than a rod length to the tree is asking for trouble. With hook and hold tactics you need to allow 1 to 2 rod lengths as the fish will take you almost a rod length on the bite allowing for stretch in the line and that gives you less than one rod length to stop it.

If you've been pointing the rod towards the tree as per the picture and lifting the rod up to stop the fish, it's the last thing to do as you can't maximise the action/stopping power of the rod and the fish will naturally head down into the snags. The position you should be trying to achieve is the the blue line rod position which allows you to apply maximum pressure and stopping power utilising the action of the rod and minimising the potential of line breakage and hook pulls. The fish also tend to stay mid water or near the top when applying pressure with the rod held low.

If you can reach the tree with 8mm pellets my approach would be a simple straight lead, 8lb main line and 0.21 power line to a size 12 Guru MWG with double 8mm drilled pellet on the hook or a 10mm piece of punched meat. If that doesn't stop them it would be 10lb maxima and 0.23 power line noting I've fished what look to be much snaggier pegs on the 8lb set up and had no problems with fish to 16lbs noting you have to have ultimate confidence in your set up and be able to exploit it to the full.

Hope this helps.

Snag peg 2.jpeg
 
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OldTaff

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@dave brittain 1

10AFD903-42E4-4A0B-BA9D-23C0977322A5.jpeg

Up until now I’ve focussed on feeding and fishing in the yellow oval working on the hope it gives me enough breathing space from the trees to be able to play the fish back down the central channel.

Since spawning it’s a different game and they are steaming straight at the trees, even the tiddlers.

All your spots are well within reach of 8mm pellets & a 1g inline bomb which is what I’m fishing, gone up from .17 to .19 hooklength with 8lb Drennan but will get heavier tomorrow and retie. As you suggest I’m already using twin drilled 8mm but to a size 12 QM1.

Time for clenched buttocks and hold on for dear life then :LOL:
 

richox12

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Thing is....you're not comparing like for like. 0.19mm N'Gauge v Drennan Feeder 7lb. Drennan don't make a 7lb but their 6lb is 0.23mm and 8lb 0.26mm. So it is totally unfair to compare a line which is nearly 30% thinner. Thicker lines will be more abrasion resistant than thinner lines because..................there's more of them to wear out !
 

OldTaff

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Thing is....you're not comparing like for like. 0.19mm N'Gauge v Drennan Feeder 7lb. Drennan don't make a 7lb but their 6lb is 0.23mm and 8lb 0.26mm. So it is totally unfair to compare a line which is nearly 30% thinner. Thicker lines will be more abrasion resistant than thinner lines because..................there's more of them to wear out !
Fair comment
 
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