Simple Bolt Rigs

Truly

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I am still struggling to understand how a free running lead can cause a fish to self-hook. For a hook to penetrate it must have to be pulled against a degree of inertia? Where does that inertia come from, if not simply the tension of the main line as set by the bait-runner?
I then wonder why the roach that give those 'smash and grab' bikes, that pull the quiver right round, don't hook themselves?
Do non-tether, self-hooking bolt rigs still exist or am I just being thick?
 

Millers Thumb

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I am still struggling to understand how a free running lead can cause a fish to self-hook. For a hook to penetrate it must have to be pulled against a degree of inertia? Where does that inertia come from, if not simply the tension of the main line as set by the bait-runner?
I then wonder why the roach that give those 'smash and grab' bikes, that pull the quiver right round, don't hook themselves?
Do non-tether, self-hooking bolt rigs still exist or am I just being thick?
see if you can find Alan Scothornes video on youtube, he his fishing at lindholme lakes using elasticated feeder links, they act as a bolt rig effect when quiver tip is tightened, it might give you ideas, sorry dont know how to put link up. hope it helps.
 

ukzero1

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I am still struggling to understand how a free running lead can cause a fish to self-hook. For a hook to penetrate it must have to be pulled against a degree of inertia? Where does that inertia come from, if not simply the tension of the main line as set by the bait-runner?
I then wonder why the roach that give those 'smash and grab' bikes, that pull the quiver right round, don't hook themselves?
Do non-tether, self-hooking bolt rigs still exist or am I just being thick?
When a fish picks the bait up, it usually swims off, if the line is tight and the bait runner drag is also on the tight side, it will self hook initially until it gets up enough momentum to take line off the spool.
 

solwood

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I am still struggling to understand how a free running lead can cause a fish to self-hook. For a hook to penetrate it must have to be pulled against a degree of inertia? Where does that inertia come from, if not simply the tension of the main line as set by the bait-runner?
I then wonder why the roach that give those 'smash and grab' bikes, that pull the quiver right round, don't hook themselves?
Do non-tether, self-hooking bolt rigs still exist or am I just being thick?
Tadpole I suggested earlier, bolt effect that becomes free running
 

Truly

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There is another solution

Fox tadpole grommets

Run ring sits over a small grommet and you get the initial bolt effect that then frees the lead so it's free running

I have never had a lead still fixed after landing a fish

Thank you. I have never seen these. Just checking for understanding........ I am assuming that the bead faces the hook length and the tapered section faces the reel? The tapered section then caters for different sizes of run ring? Once the run ring clears the 'ridge' that fits it, it's then free to run up the line?
It will be interesting to hear how @Arry and @ukzero1 view this solution too.
 
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ukzero1

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Thank you. I have never seen these. Just checking for understanding........ I am assuming that the bead faces the hook length and the tapered section faces the reel? The tapered section then caters for different sizes of run ring? Once the run ring clears the 'ridge' that fits it, it's then free to run up the line?
It will be interesting to hear how @Arry and @ukzero1 view this solution too.
I'll be honest and say I've never tried those. I'll certainly give them a go if the tackle shop has them in. I've always fished a simple inline lead/feeder set-up.
 

Dave

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Don't forget there's no saying the fish is going to move off inline with the mainline and pull line straight out of the feeder, it could head towards the rod therefore pulling the hooklength and feeder. Or it could swim upwards lifting the feeder, in fact in any direction.
 

ukzero1

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Don't forget there's no saying the fish is going to move off inline with the mainline and pull line straight out of the feeder, it could head towards the rod therefore pulling the hooklength and feeder. Or it could swim upwards lifting the feeder, in fact in any direction.
You forgot to mention the snags. :eek: :giggle:
 

Truly

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Bob Roberts shows this rig as non-tether. Looks nice and simple but is it safe?
 

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Lee Richards

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If the line breaks above the tubing I would say no as the lead is clearly pinching the tube.
Tubes also vary in their softness.

I used to use a rubber tulip on the swivel and the lead was attached onto the "tail"
Bought a harder batch of tulips and the lead didn't come off as freely as other batches - this is never communicated when "how to's" are put together.
 

JohnLondon

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In essence, yes, it is safe but I would use one of the anti tangle sleeves. They are tapered & the lead easily pulls off these with minimal effort but provides just enough of a bolt effect to prick the fishes mouth
 

ukzero1

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Bob Roberts shows this rig as non-tether. Looks nice and simple but is it safe?
Not in my book but I’m not a bailiff
Not in my book either. That type of rig is banned on the waters round here, it's a semi fixed bolt rig. Lead/feeder must be free-running with nothing placed above the lead/feeder.
 

solwood

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Thank you. I have never seen these. Just checking for understanding........ I am assuming that the bead faces the hook length and the tapered section faces the reel? The tapered section then caters for different sizes of run ring? Once the run ring clears the 'ridge' that fits it, it's then free to run up the line?
It will be interesting to hear how @Arry and @ukzero1 view this solution too.
That's correct, they used to come with run rings, the head end just goes over the swivel, but is not fixed and you can push tubing in the tail end (I use tungsten tubing).


Like arry I don't like lead clips, too many push the rear rubber on too far

And Nash suggests pinning the clip so it can't come free from the swivel not for me !
 

Arry

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The simple answer is a running rig can't safely be made into a bolt rig... a lot of top lads use really heavy leads for running rigs as it helps with the hooking as the lead stays fairly static due to its weight, but even then its still not a bolt rig... I really cannot see the fascination with bolt rigs... its pure laziness... "lob out a rig and retire to bivvy and wait for the fish to hook itself"....??? No sorry... not for me...
The Fox beads work okay and to me are an acceptable way of making a semi-bolt rig but I have seen lads pushing the swivel tight over the rubber which negates the safety aspect of the rig...
One way of turning an inline into a semi bolt rig is to use an inline lead with a soft rubber sleeve... the swivel between the mainline and hooklink sits snugly in the rubber insert but comes free with very little force... the weight of the lead initially pricks the fish, which bolts and the lead slides up the line and comes off the mainline in the event of a break, this is the style of fishing I use as well as a simple lead on a swivel with a rubber bead to protect the knot on the swivel
 

Zerkalo

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Fish hook themselves when I fish an in-line method feeder against the weight of the feeder. Beads and swivels push into leads and method feeders to make them semi fixed. Admittedly I don’t understand the thread and also use heli rigs and float stops above a feeder on a river.
 

Arry

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Fish hook themselves when I fish an in-line method feeder against the weight of the feeder. Beads and swivels push into leads and method feeders to make them semi fixed. Admittedly I don’t understand the thread and also use heli rigs and float stops above a feeder on a river.
If a bailiff checks your rigs on the river he'll ask you to remove the float stop above the feeder... its not a safe rig mate...
 

Zerkalo

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A lot of people use that rig though. The upper stop will often move simply from the force of a bite.
 

qtaran111

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It’s an interesting point. Although heli rigs are very popular they wouldn’t be allowed on some of the stillwaters I fish.
 
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