Shotting a Slider

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Triturus

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I have read various articles regarding the best tangle-free patterns of shotting a slider, most seem to agree that the distance between the hook and the dropper should be less than the distance between the dropper and the bulk BUT then there is some disagreement as to wether or not you should cast off your bulk, i.e. have a smaller shot some distance above the bulk.
Can anyone comment?
Also whats the best material to use for the stop knot?

Regards

Neil
 

MALC

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Not fished a Slider for ages but always found it easier to cast off the bulk.

Regards the stop-knot i've always used normal line of a slightly lower dia than the main line with no problems.



MALC
IT'S CATCHING ...BUT ARE YOU !!!
 

Dave

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Cast nearly off the bulk Neil as it stops your rig from 'helicoptering' which could lead to tangles. Put a number 6 about 12inches up from the bulk to let the float rest against. It's also more accurate.

As for stop knot, use something like 8lb line but leave the tails about 1inch long to stop snagging in the rod rings

Likewise I haven't used one for ages but used to a lot with some good results


Dave
 

fishing_mad

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i know when i used to sea fish i used 30lb line for a stop knot and it worked great so for pond use yeh about 8lb line

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anyexcuse

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I fished the slider quite a bit in Port Talbot Docks which is 15-30ft deep, fishing for skimmers mainly.I'm no expert on the method but I can give you the benefit of my past mistakes. Our sliders tend to be 10g homemade jobs with 4" thin cane tips which are very sensitive. My stop knot is made from mono of either the same or 1lb less than the main line.Always leave 1" tails on the knot as it goes easier through the rings believe it or not.I try to use loaded floats, as they tend to 'fly' more accurately as they stay closer to the single BB I place approx 2ft above the bulk.The bulk and hook length trace are attached to the main line by a micro-swivel which is important. I then use a maximum of 2 No.4 (or a 4 and a 6) below the bulk.I'll often use another micro swivel with a 12" hook length below.I guess from bulk to hook is no more than 3ft.
You dont need your no.8-13's but the real knack is plumbing up.Rather than use a plummet I use the bulk to find my depth.Move the stop knot until the float is riding high.At this point your bulk will be on the bottom.Adjust till the float cocks properly, them move your stop knot back towards the float the distance between the hook and the bulk. You then have dead depth.Mark this point on your rod by using the stop knot as a reference point when you wind in.Fish either just touching the bottom or off it.
I hope this helps. Although we fish heavier floats than you'll probably use, the principles are the same.

Dave@Brynmill&DistrictAC
 

Chopper

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I fished big sliders in the world club champs, Dave is definately right in saying to use a 'loaded' float. This stops the waggler sliding up the line when you cast which usually results in a tangle. A loaded float always stops tight to your bulk when casting.

I usually use three or four droppers or a small bulk of droppers from my main bulk starting a good distance from the float and getting closer together going down to the hooklength.

I would usually start with having three number 8's bulked together then two, then just one closest to the hook length.

It is also important to 'feather' your line after you have cast out just before your float hits the water. This makes the line from your float to your hook land forward in a line beyond your float and stops it from just landing in a heap in the same spot.

Also make sure you leave your bail arm off and line free to run off your spool until your stop knot hits your float. I just use normal mono 4lb ish for a stop knot.

As for plumbing up, if your float takes 4xSSG's I would use a small plummet but only have 1 or 2 SSG's as your bulk. This way your float should pop straight to the surface in a straight vertical line above your plummet and then when you have got the depth spot on you can shot your float accordingly.

Daves way of plumbing up will probably be just as good.

If you are fishing a long way out like we were in Croatia, paint a section of a straw, about 1/2" (eg McDonalds type) and glue your waggler bristle to the inside of it. This is great as it is easy to see at long distances and hardly compromises the sensitivity of the float as it's hollow.

Lee Saville - Colmic Team Ossett

Individual 2002 World Club Champion, Zagreb - Croatia.
Individual 2002 Angling Times North East Region Winter League Champion.
2001 Embassy Division 1 National Team Champions.

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Triturus

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Thanks for your detailed information, i'd like to be somewhat proficient before hopefully giving it a go in Ireland.
I have heard rumours that you can use thin pole elastic for the stop knot, or you can buy actual plastic ones, although I couldn't see how something like that would easily go through the rings

Neil
 

anyexcuse

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The only advantage I can see with using pole elastic is that it would be more visible.Personally I think it better to use mono.It's easier to keep the knot tight,because if your stop knot slips, it cocks everything up.One minute you're catching, the next you're not - another of my early mistakes.I forgot to say that you can put a small bead between stop knot and float - it stops the knot going through your float eye.But make sure you use a very fine bored bead.
To get even more accurate you can clip-up on the method.First cast out to where you want to fish. Let the float settle.Then clip-up.
The next time you cast out, the float will travel until it hits the clip sending your rig out in a line. When it hits the water, immediately wind on 3 turns of the handle then open the bail arm. You'll find the float will move through the water and stop right over where you want it to.

Dave@Brynmill&DistrictAC
 
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