Setup for Thames between Richmond and Kingston

Muad Dib

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Oct 3, 2020
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Hi fishing gurus,

I haven't been doing serious fishing for a while, except on occasional vacation, but after being stuck in the house for months prospect of being outdoors by the river is increasingly tempting. Brings me back to times when as a young lad I was running around small rivers with tiny knackered rod and enjoying it. I would like to try surf fishing as well, but this is a bit of the hike.
I have a nice stretch of Thames almost on the doorstep, and that seems like a great place to start, get out when I have few hours to spare etc.
I was looking into what would be a good starting setup, with a couple of rods but things seem to be pretty complicated these days. There are so many types of rods and variants within each type and I'm not sure what to go for. I'm not targeting any specific species or monsters, but would like something flexible and versatile as possible.

From what I saw weight on the bottom seems to be most common approach around here, so I guess at least one of the rods should be a feeder. I would prefer something not too long, 9-10ft, there are no big casting distances around here. Also, I like float fishing where feasible, so would like if one of the two roads can be used for this as well. I know there are differences in action, weight load etc., but am I completely wrong in thinking that when not being used with float, something like 10ft match rod can work with lighter weights on bottom as well? Any ideas on specific model?

Reels seem to be more straightforward, I have a couple of decent 2000 reels and they will do for the start at least.
Also any other suggestions on hook size, rigs, bait, locations etc. would be most welcome.

I guess with all the rain some of you may be stuck at home as well and wouldn't mind sharing some of the wisdom.

Cheers
 

Silverfisher

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Lowest I’ve fished on the Thames is chertsey but I fish it all the time up here in Oxfordshire and know people that fish or have fished it more down your way and it doesn’t seem massively different away from the specimen side if it. I use a 13ft drennan acolyte ultra float rod paired with 3000 drennan float reel with 3lb line and an 11ft drennan acolyte ultra feeder rod paired with 4000 drennan feeder reel with 6lb line. Down where you are where it’s deeper and wider I’d probably go for a 14ft float rod, tbh going to get myself a 14ft acolyte ultra for up here as well for some swims, but a similar feeder rod would do you.

Obviously you don’t need such rods and reels in particular (all depends on budget and preference) but a minimum 13ft possibly 14ft float rod and a minimum 11ft maybe even 12ft (can get pretty wide down there) feeder rod capable of casting 30-40g would he be sensible options with 3 and 6 pound main lines respectively, obviously with lighter hook lengths. Floats wise I find loaded insert options around the 1 to 2 gram range best for wagglers and for sticks a selection that take anything from 4 no.4 up to even 6bb. Feeders in the 15-40g range should do you most of the year with black cap, cage and maybe window all you really need. Hook size is dependant on bait but 16-20 on the float and 12-16 on the feeder covers most things. Best baits on the float tend to be hemp, maggot, caster, bread, worm, pellet and on the feeder maggot, caster, worm and bread.

Hope that helps a bit. As I say I don’t have much experience of the lower Thames but I have loads of experience of it up here and from my limited experience of and what I’ve been told of the lower it isn’t dramatically different at the basics level. That said there are some on here that have lots of experience down your way that might be able to be more specifically helpful 👍🏻
 

TrickyD

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I used to fish the tidal at Teddington, mainly trotting along the boats moored opposite the Tide End Cottage, and further along by the lock entry which was referred to as "the 4 posts". General trotting with a stick float, maggots/caster/hemp, resulted in good bags of dace and roach. Never fished between the weir at Teddington and Kingston (the bit in the videos). If fishing the tidal, waders are a must, also look at tide tables for best times, and around this time of year they have the run off, water goes very low, and catches can be fantastic.Have a walk along the river to see how far and fast the tide comes in/out, not just for seeing the terrain, but also for safety's sake, as there can be some quite sticky mud. Haven't been there for years due to parking.
 

John Step

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I used to fish that area extensively but unfortunately some 40 years ago. The tidal section below Teddington weir was usually a stick float job when the tide was on the way out. If you dont fancy wading take a long walk between Richmond and Teddington to have a scope out because there are a few sets of concrete steps to fish from.
Above Teddington we used to fish the non tidal at a park called Canbury Gardens. Whether you can still park next to the park I do not know.
One could trot or waggler depending non the flow and at the upstream end of the park it was good for bream on the feeder.

If you cross Kinston Bridge to the North side one could fish all the way up to Hampton Court. The swims above Kingston Bridge were good for bream on the feeder.

I think parking may be the biggest issue nowadays? One can cycle the whole length with minimal gear though.
 

Muad Dib

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Oct 3, 2020
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This, I believe, is between Teddington and Kingston
Yes, this should be just above Teddington lock, where tide stops... Wow, that's pretty good going, didn't realise there is so much bream there... That seems like a good working setup.
 

Muad Dib

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Joined
Oct 3, 2020
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I used to fish the tidal at Teddington, mainly trotting along the boats moored opposite the Tide End Cottage, and further along by the lock entry which was referred to as "the 4 posts". General trotting with a stick float, maggots/caster/hemp, resulted in good bags of dace and roach. Never fished between the weir at Teddington and Kingston (the bit in the videos). If fishing the tidal, waders are a must, also look at tide tables for best times, and around this time of year they have the run off, water goes very low, and catches can be fantastic.Have a walk along the river to see how far and fast the tide comes in/out, not just for seeing the terrain, but also for safety's sake, as there can be some quite sticky mud. Haven't been there for years due to parking.
Luckily I'm walking distance to Teddington lock, so no issues with the parking, that sounds like something I did in the past, will definitely give that a try...
 

Muad Dib

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Joined
Oct 3, 2020
Messages
5
I used to fish that area extensively but unfortunately some 40 years ago. The tidal section below Teddington weir was usually a stick float job when the tide was on the way out. If you dont fancy wading take a long walk between Richmond and Teddington to have a scope out because there are a few sets of concrete steps to fish from.
Above Teddington we used to fish the non tidal at a park called Canbury Gardens. Whether you can still park next to the park I do not know.
One could trot or waggler depending non the flow and at the upstream end of the park it was good for bream on the feeder.

If you cross Kinston Bridge to the North side one could fish all the way up to Hampton Court. The swims above Kingston Bridge were good for bream on the feeder.

I think parking may be the biggest issue nowadays? One can cycle the whole length with minimal gear though.
Well parking is not great in Kingston, but better if you go toward Ham... Yes, you can cycle from Richmond to Hampton Court, so that may be an option. I guess I have two very different prospects here - tidal bellow Teddington lock and non-tidal above. Will be exploring both I imagine...
 
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