Sensible net limits?

mike fox

'Just Me and the Fish'
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Well, I'm no expert but hatchery fish are different colours to wild fish because of the environment in which they are born. If they are stocked in to a commercial fishery then the environment doesn't alter very much throughout the year except water temperature. Acidic and Alkaline water contains different native aquatic insect species and so their diet depends on the availability of certain foods but I don't think that the PH value makes a huge difference to their colouring. Even wild Barbel change colour slightly from season to season throughout the year, more so during spawning season. Hatchery Brown Trout change colour after being in a river for a period of time to blend in with their environment. Wild brownies also change colour from birth to suit their environment.
 

JayD

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Interesting comment by NoCarpPlease regarding barbel.
Most anglers will know that brown trout from wild, natural waters are beautifully coloured - brown with gold and red. I have been assured by more than one expert that this is down to the stress levels on those rivers, where food is comparatively scarce. But catch a big brownie on Rutland and they are silver with blackish spots - nothing like as attractive (though they grow much bigger). I am assured this is because food is more plentiful on alkaline inland stillwaters.

Now although I haven't been told this by anyone with expert knowledge, I can't help noticing that the same thing applies to barbel. The last time I caught barbel from the Severn (and I caught a lot) they were brown. But catch a barbel from Decoy or other local commercials and they are silver, as the photographs on my blog consistently show.

My conclusion is that provided oxygen levels are sufficient, barbel on commercial stillwaters are probably less stressed than in natural, acidic rivers like the Severn. Does anyone have expert knowledge on this?

No expert knowledge, just personal observation over the years. I've never had a barbel out of a 'commercial' so I'm basing this on other fish. I've found that the colour and appearance of many species varies from water to water. I've found perch in particular from very coloured water often have stripes that are hardly visible. Roach, and bream can look 'faded', with light grey backs. I believe that the dark back on a fish is to help camouflage them from predators. In a natural clear water, they need it, and in a heavily coloured water, it's not needed as much, so fades over time. The waters that I have fished that have had a good natural stock of mixed fish, and then are subjected to a massive stocking of mainly carp, would, I imagine, cause the resident fish a lot of stress, initially at least. I've never found this to cause any change in the appearance of the original stock. I can't vouch for what happens to the fish over time, because I've usually stopped fishing the water soon after.

John.
 

Silverfisher

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Yep fish are often more washed out in more coloured water and more vividly coloured in clearer water. Whether that’s a natural adjustment for camouflage or just how the water effects them I’m not sure though.
 

Lee Richards

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On the subject of large fish being sold on from Commercials to Big Carp waters then it is practical really as Carp anglers like to have caught known fish.
Who wouldn't want to have a resume of fish like this. :)
No Lips.
One Lip
Cleft Lip
Polly Parate
Polly's Mate
Half Tail
Split Tail
Fin Missing
Blind Polly
Cockanotail
 

JayD

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Going back to the keepnet question, I see that some have said that the optimum weight of fish in a keepnet can depend on the anglers ability to lift it clear of the water.
How about having matches based on the anglers weight class, like weightlifting or boxing. You could have bantam weight up to heavyweight matches, the lighter the weight class, the lower the weight of fish allowed per net. That would save the lighter angler from being handicapped by having to use more nets than a stronger one in the same match.

Just a suggestion:LOL:

John.
 

Dave

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There's no way I'm going to manage double chins in every match :D
 
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