Seeking advice on internal wall insulation.

angel

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To all you Gentlemen, (and lady) builders out there, I am seeking advice regarding insulating an internal wall of our bungalow.

The wall is 2.6m h x 3.3m w and gets very cold, being an east facing wall. It is normal brick with cavity built in 1956 so is the same age as me.

We have had some mould problems before when we had furniture backing onto the wall, but I dont think it is damp now.

My current thoughts are to build a timber stud wall fixed to the inside, fill the spaces with kingspan and plasterboard over.

What are the pro's and cons please?
Thank you 😊👍
 

FadingLikeDecay

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Hi Angel, I probably wouldn't advise building a stud wall as that would take up more floor space than necessary. I'd initially recommend using an insulated plasterboard bonded onto your existing internal wall finish with 10mm plasterboard adhesive (known as Dot and Dab or similar). The main benefit from these boards are installation time is much quicker than erecting a stud and filling with a quilt roll or batts, or having to saw-cut rigid insulation boards. Simply tape and fill afterwards and apply a plaster skim-coat if you wish.

There are different boards to choose from Manufacturers such as:
British Gypsum: Gyproc Thermal Laminates
Knauf: Knauf XPS Laminate Plus Insulated Plasterboard Tapered Edge - 55mm x 1.2m x 2.4m
Kingspan: Kooltherm K118 Insulated Plasterboard

InsulationSuperstore can give you some ideas on board costs : PIR - Plasterboard | Insulation Superstore®

If you go down the timber stud route, you'd probably need 63x38mm CLS, your insulation of choice suited for lining external walls (internally) and regular 12.5mm wallboard.

There are metal stud options British Gypsum GypLyner Single
 

davej

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In our old house we used this, made a lot of difference walls never felt cold, condensation and mould disappeared.
 

slaner

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Hi Angel, I probably wouldn't advise building a stud wall as that would take up more floor space than necessary. I'd initially recommend using an insulated plasterboard bonded onto your existing internal wall finish with 10mm plasterboard adhesive (known as Dot and Dab or similar). The main benefit from these boards are installation time is much quicker than erecting a stud and filling with a quilt roll or batts, or having to saw-cut rigid insulation boards. Simply tape and fill afterwards and apply a plaster skim-coat if you wish.

There are different boards to choose from Manufacturers such as:
British Gypsum: Gyproc Thermal Laminates
Knauf: Knauf XPS Laminate Plus Insulated Plasterboard Tapered Edge - 55mm x 1.2m x 2.4m
Kingspan: Kooltherm K118 Insulated Plasterboard

InsulationSuperstore can give you some ideas on board costs : PIR - Plasterboard | Insulation Superstore®

If you go down the timber stud route, you'd probably need 63x38mm CLS, your insulation of choice suited for lining external walls (internally) and regular 12.5mm wallboard.

There are metal stud options British Gypsum GypLyner Single
exactly what i was going to say but worded better lol
 

angel

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Well thats given me something to consider, I particularly like the insulated plasterboard idea, thanks for that. I will see how the various products compare budget-wise and where I can get them.
 

Dave

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I owned a house previously that had an issue with the bathroom external wall always being cold which in turn led to condensation issues. Just that one external wall, no others.

Upon investigating it I found that the section was a solid brick wall, no cavity unlike the rest of the house. It had been built like that for some inexplicable reason (first floor, midsection of the side wall)

The wall either side of the bathroom had a cavity, it was just that one section of wall.

Anyway I resolved it using Gyproc Insulated Plasterboard, from memory I think it was around 50mm thick in total. I removed the old plaster back to brick, bonded the insulated pb to the wall, skimmed and half tiled/half painted it, and didn't have the problem afterwards.
 

Carmody

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If it’s a 1950’s bungalow then the cavity probably was left open and not insulated. not sure if you’ve had cavity wall insulation fitted, but if not then that would be worth doing, by a reputable company of course. Much less disruptive.
 

Dave

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Cavity wall insulation is not the be-all and end-all to insulation issues. Some properties will suffer more condensation and damp issues as a result of cavity wall insulation being added than being without. A lot depends on the location and direction the walls/property face
 

angel

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If it’s a 1950’s bungalow then the cavity probably was left open and not insulated. not sure if you’ve had cavity wall insulation fitted, but if not then that would be worth doing, by a reputable company of course. Much less disruptive.
I believe the wall in question has had cavity insulation at some point in its life but I can't be sure.
 

angel

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Cavity wall insulation is not the be-all and end-all to insulation issues. Some properties will suffer more condensation and damp issues as a result of cavity wall insulation being added than being without. A lot depends on the location and direction the walls/property face
The wall is the north/eastern boundary wall, the prevailing wind blows down off winter hill on the pennines so its always been the coldest part of the house, plus having another detached bungalow next door ensures the sun never shines that side... 😔
 
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