Roach fishing

Al the gooner

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Lads ,after some advice fishing for decent roach on a reservoir please .
Method ,baiting up ,hook bait etc.
Many thanks Al
 

IanG1

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Pole if in range and a decent depth otherwise waggler. Feed 2 lines one dark groundbait with high hemp content and caster in the mix, other loose fed regularly with hemp and caster would be my first line of attack.
 

Silverfisher

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Agree with the above but would also add maggots as a feed and hookbait option if not too many small fish are about. If it's a big reservoir don't discount all the same baits combined with the feeder as the fish may be beyond float range.
 

KevinT

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Nov 2, 2013
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Hi
Big roach are relatively easy to catch, the problem is finding them on a big reservoir. I fished a reservoir for nearly a year and it took me months of blanks to get to know where the fish would be at different times of the year, The only reason I kept going was seeing recent captures made by other anglers who knew the reservoir better than me. The reservoir I fished was anywhere between 6 and 40 foot deep and the roach never showed on the surface so it was a case of fishing three of four pegs a day until I caught. I then made a record of peg / weather / temps ect. After six months I could fish areas of the reservoir in given conditions to get a few nice fish using the data gained helping me decide the best area to fish, but they always taught me a lesson. I fished mainly waggler at 6 to 8 rod lengths and loose fed red maggots, casters and hemp seed. I had roach to over two pounds on the drop - even in the depths of winter roach will take a bait on the drop as I believe they rarely feed on the bottom in this reservoir. Feeder didn't seem to work and the shoal never stayed long once a few had been caught, I think it's important to keepnet big roach and keep on the move changing pegs if sport stops as they rarely returned

Tackle wise reservoir roach aren't really tackle shy and a size 18 B511 hook to a 0,009mm under a 2 swan shot peacock waggler with a few size 8 shot taking the bait down was my given tactic. A long rod allowed me to fish up to 15 foot deep. Finding the catching depth is the difficult bit - I've taken the fish at 8 foot deep over 40 foot of water or 5 foot deep in 6 foot. They love drop offs into deeper water and will shoal near any overhanging trees if the reservoir has any cover. The fish will rise when the bait continues to rain in over them so be prepared to keep shallowing up. On the pre-baiting front this didn't seem to work as there were bream in the water and I think they mopped all the pre-bait up over night.

Good luck

KevT
 

tipitinmick

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When me and dad used to target big roach on Wintersett reservoir we used to fish an open feeder, 50/50 brown & white crumb witb breadflake on the hook. Using maggot and casters only broght the small roach on the feed. The benefit of using bread was that we often found some good tench also. Good luck pal ?
 

rudd

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Traditional type methods as above still work but:
Helicopter feeder set up with plastic casters/maggots. The feeder can be either block end or cage so groundbait can be used.
Method feeder or a small safety clip set up with chickpea or a pineapple boilie.
Pva bags can be used with the safety set up or fish over balled in or spodded groundbait/particles.
Chickpeas work very well over pariblend/hemp and pick off the bigger specimens.
The modern methods are used with two rods, a pod set up will make manoeuvring pegs easy as can be carried with rods on it.
 

squimp

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Hi
Big roach are relatively easy to catch, the problem is finding them on a big reservoir. I fished a reservoir for nearly a year and it took me months of blanks to get to know where the fish would be at different times of the year, The only reason I kept going was seeing recent captures made by other anglers who knew the reservoir better than me. The reservoir I fished was anywhere between 6 and 40 foot deep and the roach never showed on the surface so it was a case of fishing three of four pegs a day until I caught. I then made a record of peg / weather / temps ect. After six months I could fish areas of the reservoir in given conditions to get a few nice fish using the data gained helping me decide the best area to fish, but they always taught me a lesson. I fished mainly waggler at 6 to 8 rod lengths and loose fed red maggots, casters and hemp seed. I had roach to over two pounds on the drop - even in the depths of winter roach will take a bait on the drop as I believe they rarely feed on the bottom in this reservoir. Feeder didn't seem to work and the shoal never stayed long once a few had been caught, I think it's important to keepnet big roach and keep on the move changing pegs if sport stops as they rarely returned

Tackle wise reservoir roach aren't really tackle shy and a size 18 B511 hook to a 0,009mm under a 2 swan shot peacock waggler with a few size 8 shot taking the bait down was my given tactic. A long rod allowed me to fish up to 15 foot deep. Finding the catching depth is the difficult bit - I've taken the fish at 8 foot deep over 40 foot of water or 5 foot deep in 6 foot. They love drop offs into deeper water and will shoal near any overhanging trees if the reservoir has any cover. The fish will rise when the bait continues to rain in over them so be prepared to keep shallowing up. On the pre-baiting front this didn't seem to work as there were bream in the water and I think they mopped all the pre-bait up over night.

Good luck

KevT

KevT is bang on.

The issue is location. If you can find them, you can catch them. Even in really cold weather.

As Kev says it is simply a function of getting to understand the patterns and eventually you will be able to predict where the fish will be under certain conditions.

Big roach in big lakes like ‘moving’ water - so one tip is to try and find areas of the water where the undertow is strongest. Once you work it out you can test things by casting lightish feeders into adjacent swims and the feeder will hold in one swim and move in the next....the fish are likely to be in the ‘moving’ water. Undertow is generally a function of wind direction/strength relative to the physical characteristics (bank shape, depth etc) of the swim(s). If the wind shifts slightly the undertow may well alter as a result.

It is a challenge !
 

Chris Calder

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I agree with a few on here that location is most important, if the lake is clear don't be put off fishing at the end with the wind blowing into it, fishing with a side wind or right in your face, what I would be looking for would be where the water shallows up to about 4-6 feet on the edge of where the water colours up a bit, foodstuffs from the bottom would be getting disturbed in the strong shallow tow affected area also the extra couler gives the fish confidence to feed in the area without being easy prey to predators, it's not always the deepest swims which produce in winter on big lakes.
the day after or during a really strong wind is an ideal time to go to these shallower areas, not comfortable but cracking fishing on a nice loaded waggler
 
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