Reservoir bream fishing

Silverfisher

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So my grandad has been inspired by the article in this months IYCF to possibly have a go at grimsbury reservoir for the bream next week before the rivers open. It's not really my sort of venue but seeing as I've done a lot of wag and wag silvers fishing on fairly standard sized stillwaters over the last couple weeks a change of scene and style before getting back onto running water is probably not a bad idea so I might join him. Figured if the guy in the article got 40 odd for 200lb surely we can achieve maybe 10% of that lol

Slight challenge is that I've never used a feeder on a Stillwater before and have only been doing it on rivers about 5 years with grandad not massively more experienced at it either so will be a bit of a standing start. We've done a fair bit of breaming on the Thames so have roughly the right gear and half an idea of what to do but it seems from the article that it is a much more extreme form of fishing so I have a few questions on stuff not super clearly covered in the article.

It seems that a lot of bait is needed but it's not clear how much from the article? We don't use masses on the thames but then on there we are more just looking to pick up a few bream amongst mixed bags of other species plus there's obviously a lot less water involved.

Distance seems to be the in thing but is a big chuck actually necessary on such waters or just the done thing? We've only got 11ft rods that can cast maybe 60 years at a push but more comfortable at 40-50 so hoping that'll be enough on a water that isn't massive by reservoir standards.

Lastly what sort of hooklengths do people use for such fishing? We generally use footish 3 to 4 pound ones to 16s or 14s the Thames so would start blindly with them but no idea if that's sensible on a reservoir.

Basically in summary if we do give it a go it'll be one of the few forms of fishing that neither of us have much of a clue about so any guidance would be appreciated!
 

chefster

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So my grandad has been inspired by the article in this months IYCF to possibly have a go at grimsbury reservoir for the bream next week before the rivers open. It's not really my sort of venue but seeing as I've done a lot of wag and wag silvers fishing on fairly standard sized stillwaters over the last couple weeks a change of scene and style before getting back onto running water is probably not a bad idea so I might join him. Figured if the guy in the article got 40 odd for 200lb surely we can achieve maybe 10% of that lol

Slight challenge is that I've never used a feeder on a Stillwater before and have only been doing it on rivers about 5 years with grandad not massively more experienced at it either so will be a bit of a standing start. We've done a fair bit of breaming on the Thames so have roughly the right gear and half an idea of what to do but it seems from the article that it is a much more extreme form of fishing so I have a few questions on stuff not super clearly covered in the article.

It seems that a lot of bait is needed but it's not clear how much from the article? We don't use masses on the thames but then on there we are more just looking to pick up a few bream amongst mixed bags of other species plus there's obviously a lot less water involved.

Distance seems to be the in thing but is a big chuck actually necessary on such waters or just the done thing? We've only got 11ft rods that can cast maybe 60 years at a push but more comfortable at 40-50 so hoping that'll be enough on a water that isn't massive by reservoir standards.

Lastly what sort of hooklengths do people use for such fishing? We generally use footish 3 to 4 pound ones to 16s or 14s the Thames so would start blindly with them but no idea if that's sensible on a reservoir.

Basically in summary if we do give it a go it'll be one of the few forms of fishing that neither of us have much of a clue about so any guidance would be appreciated!
I’ve fished it many times, I actually fish a large guru hybrid with micro pellets, and a white chocolate mini boilie...Bream love them .... I chuck 10 large feeder fulls straight away, then chuck with a bait on,50m is fine ... you can use open end feeder but I doubt you’ll get the distance and accuracy....beware, there are carp in there upto 30lb, good chance you’ll hook one
 

Old git on a seatbox

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Reccomend not being scared to use a 12 with worm on a speed stop or corn long hooklengths of a metre being a good start ,you can always go shorter if your missing bites or getting too many liners.use a big cage at beginning to put some bait in,maybe 10_15 feederfulls and then use a smaller one but with enough weight to keep hitting your line clip.
 

Silverfisher

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Thanks both sounds good advice. 10 feeders initially sounds good I was fearing more haha

I’m thinking of going with a two rod approach. One pretty much the same as I would on the river (save for pellets instead of groundbait seeing as it’s banned) with a fairly short hooklength with natural bait like worm or maggot and the other perhaps with a longer hooklength with something like corn, pellet or now you mention it a bollie/wafter type of thing.

I was wondering if a cage would cast well enough so I was thinking of maybe a window feeder as they cast like bullets. Think I might have a hybrid type feeder somewhere as well.
 

Zerkalo

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Not knowing that particular ressie I can only offer my experience of fishing places like Edgbaston Reservoir. They are usually quite hit and miss due to the size, but when you have a red letter day due to hitting a shoal it can be amazing so good luck.
 

davepellet

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the distance you fish is important, but not from a 'must cast to the horizon' perspective, the fish will have natural patrol routes, and if you're not in the general vicinity of these, you're not going to attract too many fish, so homework is very important

another thing I'd say is imperative is you must be casting to more or less the same place every time, so pick a distance that you're comfortable casting to, and make sure it's not so far that you then can't reach it if the wind picks up, and by casting out a simple 1oz bomb, clip up when you're happy... then you can substitute the feeder & hooklength - but also align your cast with a permanent far bank marker like a tree... and provided you cast smoothly on the same line every time & hit the clip (without bounce-back) you should be okay

next thing is line, unless you're going for big distances stick to mono, as braid can be difficult to handle if you're not used to it, tangles very easily & has a tendency to float... use a mainline that isn't going to snap on the cast with the weight of feeder (I tend to use 6lb reel line) and hooklengths of anything from 12-24", for me generally 0.12 diameter sometimes 0.14 if they're feeding well, size 16 & 18 hooks (I use a microbarb for the bigger distance casts, purely because of the time it takes to bring a fish in, and the venue in question allows them... this is the only instance I use a barb of any description)

feeders, depend on distance & depth, feeder weight is dictated by distance & the amount of undertow, typically 25-30g for me... but will fish lighter or heavier if I feel it's right. The type of feeder is dictated by depth & what you're feeding... I fish a deep water, so tend to use the traditional style plastic feeder with slots... on a shallower water I'd switch to wire cage feeders, but with the depth I fish, a cage feeder would probably have emptied itself before it hit the deck

I also tend to put out a heavy initial feed to get a bed of bait down straight away, and initially when I rediscovered this type of fishing, I was there casting out multiple feeder-loads, up to 20 casts, to get that feed down... Now (or rather when I start back up again) I have an old power feeder rod, dedicated to this with a big feed feeder on... and this has helped to reduce the amount of casts I do on the initial bombardment!
The feeders I use for this I bought online from Benwick Sports, but a lot of places are selling them now (mine area actually wire cage style, but they've wrapped in electricians tape to ensure the feed stays put until it hits the deck & I start the retrieve)

If you do adopt that approach, you got to ensure the two rods are clipped up to the same distance, and most serious feeder anglers use measuring sticks to ensure this... I don't, as I've simply not got round to buying any.... instead I measure mine against the number of handle turns it takes to retrieve them both (I have the same reel on both rods)
 

chefster

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Thanks both sounds good advice. 10 feeders initially sounds good I was fearing more haha

I’m thinking of going with a two rod approach. One pretty much the same as I would on the river (save for pellets instead of groundbait seeing as it’s banned) with a fairly short hooklength with natural bait like worm or maggot and the other perhaps with a longer hooklength with something like corn, pellet or now you mention it a bollie/wafter type of thing.

I was wondering if a cage would cast well enough so I was thinking of maybe a window feeder as they cast like bullets. Think I might have a hybrid type feeder somewhere as well.
you sometimes have to wait for an hour for a bite, so keep chucking the feeder every 10 mins till the fish turn up...I prefer the hybrid,(method feeders no good it’s too deep) 4 inch Hooklength, boilie spike hair rigged .. size 14 qm1, 10 mm white choc boilie....
 
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Zerkalo

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Having just read the IYCF article it looks like a cracking venue and not too big in size so the fish shouldn’t be too difficult to find. If it was me I’d follow the advice in he article and go for a method feeder, taking a few other feeders with me in case. Thinking to if I was going to fish somewhere like Edgbaston again I’d be looking at prebaiting as per the decent Cadence video there. This doesn’t sound necessary for the venue you’re fishing and as above just put some bait in at the start should do it.
 

Silverfisher

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Sounds good chefstar definitely a bonus to hear from someone that’s fished it regularly.

Tbh I’ve driven past it loads of times and never really fancied it but seeing that article and the fact it’ll cost me nothing now it’s on the club ticket I figure it’s probably worth a go. Would never expect to catch many as would probably just be a session or two next week before the rivers open but if we could get a handful each I’d be well chuffed.
 

chefster

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Sounds good chefstar definitely a bonus to hear from someone that’s fished it regularly.

Tbh I’ve driven past it loads of times and never really fancied it but seeing that article and the fact it’ll cost me nothing now it’s on the club ticket I figure it’s probably worth a go. Would never expect to catch many as would probably just be a session or two next week before the rivers open but if we could get a handful each I’d be well chuffed.
When they move in , it’s 1 a chuck 👍
 

smiffy

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They’ll come to you mate, just keep that bait going in
Sums up Bream fishing in a single sentence really and also where a lot of people go wrong. The ”keep the bait going in“ bit is vital and I can’t stress enough how important it is. A shoal of Bream will mop up a large amount of food in a very short space of time. Then they’ll move on. Look at them as an underwater herd of cows.
 

Zerkalo

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I like to feed heavy with a Groundbait Catapult at the start of my Bream sessions, personal preference as I fish within that range at my place, as I like to spread a shoal and catch fish from the edge of the shoal so as not to spook the rest of the shoal. I'm always wary of putting anymore groundbait in via a catapult after the start though, keeping the bait going in via a feeder, as Bream sometimes do not like bait going in over their heads.
 

DAMFLASK CHRIS

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what i did last year was i bought a fish finder and cast around to find where pockets of fish where i fish, more so because it was up to 100 ft deep reservoir
found out where some shoals are did not always work but i knew where i had more chance of getting bites
 

NoCarpPlease

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I live less than ten miles from Grimsbury and fished it once about 25 years ago!

Accordng to google maps 50m chuck would take you to middle at the widest point.

Perhaps I should try it again!
is it day ticket?
Is there a locked gate at any time?
is the car parking relatively close still?

According to a previous thread - Grimsbury res is up to 20ft deep
 

Silverfisher

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Day ticket or membership and looks like the parking is quite close. Doesn’t mention locked access anymore.
 

adriang

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Lots of particles hemp and corn. For volume, a bag of frozen corn is cheaper than tins although you don't get the juice. If you and your grandfather don't share a swim, perhaps try and fish adjoining ones and try to feed and fish between the two of you. The brasem additive is worth thinking about, I think its very vanilla smelling.
 

adriang

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I've got a feeling Grimsbury doesn't allow groundbait. I think its the same 'small reservoir owned by Thames water' I saw a YouTube video of a live match, where it was won by somebody going at it with spods and particles, and then being very patient.
 
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