Remove hook first.

crackatoa

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2015
Messages
6,483
Just seen a few pics of Carp on a club facebook page. The angler has been on a runs water and had a few Carp of 8lb-12lb. He has proudly taken a pic of each one showing the hook complete with boilie still in the mouth of the fish.
A member commented that the first job is surely to remove the hook so as not to cause damage if the fish starts thrashing around. The reply was that all fish were returned in good health, so not an issue.

So what is it....

Grab camera or remove hook?
 
D

Deleted member 24128

Guest
Remove hook. It's just common sense. Well, it should be. His reply was dim and should have been followed by "this time".
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
9,697
95% of the time I remove the hook first but once in a while I do like the classic picture of a roach hooked in the top lip with a tare or grain of hemp on its nose. Similar to when fly anglers do it with a fly or lure anglers with a lure. I would personally never do it with a bigger fish though as if it flipped about all hell could let loose and it and things could get damaged.
 

rd115

Barbus Minimus
Site Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2019
Messages
2,299
Nonsense, we all know carp are raging punky emos and love having piercings having out of their mouths :LOL:
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,242
Definitely out of order and a word in his ear is needed. If he shows scant regards to the fish, he'll show the same with some of the fishery rules.
 

rudd

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2013
Messages
6,622
So he holds fish up with hook in its mouth, slips and gets hook in his hand or other, line may also still be through fishes mouth.
Or fish slips out of his hands, lands in water, bolts and then takes rod in!
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
9,697
I generally just take a picture of a few of the prettier stamp fish and bigger fish for reporting on here and to friends and family. They are generally just a quick pic in my hand or the net though not a drawn out posy picture with me in shot taken by someone else. Proportionately speaking having a posy picture with an 8lb carp is like doing it with an 8oz silver lol
 

MartinWY

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2019
Messages
387
Just seen a few pics of Carp on a club facebook page. The angler has been on a runs water and had a few Carp of 8lb-12lb. He has proudly taken a pic of each one showing the hook complete with boilie still in the mouth of the fish.
A member commented that the first job is surely to remove the hook so as not to cause damage if the fish starts thrashing around. The reply was that all fish were returned in good health, so not an issue.

So what is it....

Grab camera or remove hook?

Remove hook. If the fish starts to thrash about and the hook gets caught on something or line wound around angler or fish and yadda yadda.

Can't imagine any club being OK with that.

The only time I've ever seen it done (legitimately?) is large shark and other big game fishing where the hook is often cut away from the leader after the photo rather than removed. When thats done the fish has to be properly secured with tail ropes etc due to risk from primarily the line. Tail ropes are no use on carp.
 

Simon90

Regular member
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
115
For me it's hook out and promptly returned, unless it needs holding in the water to recover before swimming off.
I Rarely take pictures and never weigh anything. But I often see anglers with fish on the bank who are getting their phones to take a picture, or getting their mate to come and take the picture etc. If your going to do that, you should at least be prepared so you can do it quickly and efficiently, and get the fish back in the water.
 

Deejay8

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
718
Remove the hook, and then if that's done quickly and efficiently, and the fish appears ok, then take a photo. But if the fish is showing signs of distress, return it to the water immediately without photographing it. I never used to carry a camera and so I don't have any photos of my biggest fish, but I can remember them and that's the most important thing. I guess it's a bit different now, as everyone has a camera on their phone.So now I would probably photograph the bigger specimens.
 
Top