Remarkable Fisherman!

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G2LAndrew

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There was a thread a little while back about who the most influential anglers were, one for specimens and the other for all rounder. Me and at least one other chose our Granddads and since then I have thought some more about this.

I owe my Granddad a lot, he taught me not only about the general skills of fishing but also a degree of the craft that surrounds it such as reading the water and outsmarting the fish. He also ingrained into me from a very early age the principles of being a responsible angler, caring for the fish and the surrounding environment as well as how to behave around other anglers.

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My Granddad will be 97 this September and although a little unsteady on his feet he still lives in his own house, enjoys a full life (he has been on holiday to Lithuania twice in the last 12 months) and still goes fishing, although of course not quite to the same degree as a few years ago.

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I would like to vote my Granddad the most remarkable angler I know; does anybody else have stories of remarkable fishermen?
 
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phil-k

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I was thinking along the same lines yesterday.

If I ever get to an age where I can't fish would life still be worth living [?]

Just hope somebody will be willing to take me like you did with your dad. Nice one [;)][8D]
 

BARRYBLOKE

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Lovely post Andrew.
I too owe everything to my gramps. Long gone now.
He used to collect cinder waste from the boilers down were he worked.
They were called clinkers then [:D]. Not quite the same meaning these days. They were basically molten mineral waste that had cooled and were they had boiled there were popped bubbles set in the steel.
He used to melt cooking cheese as we called it then and pour it on top letting it set.
He would then throw it in and come back and fish over it for a couple of days after on tiny bits of cheese and bread paste.
The roach (his favourite) he used to catch were awesome. Fished for almost 70 years and never saw a 2lb roach.
 

G2LAndrew

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Hi guys, thanks for your comments, I agree that a world with no fishing would be a pretty dark place! I think one of the best things about fishing with your Granddad is that the stories they tell you are from a different world and the craft they employed to catch fish was such a world away from the hi-tek tactics available now. Barrybloke, my poor Granddad has always wanted to catch a 2LB roach as well but to date he just hasn't quite managed it, missing by a few ounces here and there. I would think he would say his favorite fish is Tench and Crucians which is probably why they became mine :)
 
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BARRYBLOKE

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Im sure like my grandad yours also saw a lot of things through WW11.
My grandad was in the guards so as you can imagine he saw a considerable bit but he wouldnt talk about it often, much to my dismay.
He was a very good and respected angler and just to listen to him talking about that was ace. He had a knack of showing you things you couldnt see below the surface.
He lay down on the bank with me one day for over an hour while we watched a male stickleback defending his nest. He flicked broken bits of worm in and we watched as the infuriated little redbreast shot over ,grabbed it and spat it outside his territory before returning to his guard post.
Poor little sod was tormented like that for a good hour[:D].
We would go dipping and he showed me water scorpions, diving beetles, horse leeches and I remember a tiny little bream.
Best of all his hobby was the wild west and he was an authority on it. He could tell you what Wyatt Earp had on his sandwiches if you wanted and he used that knowledge to divert my attention and questions off Germans and Japs and to enchant my early days.
 

quivertip

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i can only add what has already been said, lovely post mate, i never knew my grandfathers at all because my mother was 44 when she had me and by the time i grew up a bit both were dead, my father was my mentor though and we used to go fishing right up until he had a stroke and was no longer capable, great memories though and unbeatable..
my brother has started fishing again at the ripe ole age of 68, i'm only the baby at 53, to say he's come back after a bit of a layoff is an understatement really it's 40 years since he last fished..lol...
i've gave him a few pointers, questions i've been asked is well errmmmm a lot..lol.
what's a waggler, what's a hair rig, still i've got him going and he's doing ok, keen as mustard now and as soon as i'm able to get out after my op he's going to take me out for the day with him and a couple of others who are in their 70's, i'm looking forward to this with a passion, absolute nutters they are and apparently the beers are on me when we go for a couple of pints on the way home....great stuff....
 

G2LAndrew

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Things have certainly changed, when my Granddad was fishing a pole was a bloke from Eastern Europe and a hair rig was probably a fancy name for a comb :D But I have been careful to be as true as makes sense to the craft in the way I was shown and while I dont shy away from technology I also dont allow it to dominate my tactics, some how it all seems more pure when it is you against the fish and you start somewhere close to even.
 

arran

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fantastic thread andrew and touching nice to see that you have time for your grandpops.

barrybloke i can understand why he didn,t want to talk about something like that most of it was unhuman and not memorys you would want to pass on to somebody they went trough some cr*p
the only story my grandad told me was they was sent to egypt during the war and they had to cary most of the supplys for miles across the dunes on foot they got to destination set up camp and the whole regiment went to sleep when they woke up the egyptians had nicked everything including the tents.
 

Tangle

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My Grandad taught me to fish. Also, made all his on floats out of bits cork and quills.
A few years later he gave two split can rods and an old wooden/brass reel. At the time I could not wait to get my hands a glass fibre rod and modern reel.

Now I treasure that old tackle.
 

drayton king

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My grandad never fished but would take me any where i wanted to go.When i was younger he would sit behind me for hours,when i asked him why he didnt fish he would answer watching me catch was enough for him.Hes long gone now but i will never forget what he did for me.
 

mark bradley

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really good post andrew
My grandad also helped me with my fishing when i started still have my first rod 7ft glass fibre (awsome) also my dad was a big help those memory`s i will keep forever hope my kids will help me to carry on fishing to a ripe old age your never to old :eek:)
 

Dave

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Great post Andrew [:)]

Tell you what though, at the age of 97 he needs to look after his head a bit better, PM me your/his address and I'll send him a Maggotdrowning Baseball Cap with my compliments [^]
 

G2LAndrew

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Dave, I have sent you the address and would like to underline the comments from Barry, it is a very nice gesture, thank you very much. My Granddad has spent his whole life helping others and never really asked for anything in return. From reading the other posts in this thread I am starting to understand that perhaps that is what Granddads do!
 

murph

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Top post!

Quite simply I would not be fishing without my grandad's support, we used to go everywhere during the hols and he got me all of my gear for me. He's 92 now and can no longer fish, but loves the stories/photo's when I get back as I fish the places that we used to.

One of my overriding memories was when I caught my first ever carp, at Horton Kirby. He was always up on the latest gear and had brought me a 'Monkey Climber' and some boilies (which my nan accidently ate one of as she thought it was a strawberry!), I'd never even heard of these things!!!

Anyway, I managed to winkle out a pristine common of around 14lbs and when I eventually got it in a crowd of about ten people had gathered behind me. I'll never forget how proud my grandad was with me holding that fish and all these people looking on. Just wish I had a photo of that moment.
 
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