Reducing line twist

rd115

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Am i right in thinking playing fish on the back wind is better than the drag? Drag = line twist?

I notice method feeder fishing that after every few fish that have taken some drag i start getting line wrapped around the rod tip and i end up dangling the feeder in front of me for 30 seconds letting the line twist spin out again.

Is back wind the only option or is there something else? Are all the anti twist line roller buzzwords just marketing bunk?
 

ukzero1

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@rd115

First of all, I use both methods, the drag and back winding. I do prefer back winding as I feel it does reduce line twist. I usually walk off about 100 yards of line either when I get back from a session or just before I go, then wind it back on, that way I know there's very limited twist, if any, when I start my next session.

As for anti-twist line rollers, personally I have my doubts about these. If they are anti-twist, how come we still end up with twisted line? surely any twist would be very minimal at the least, but no, not always. Does the line twist when spooling up? With some lines, yes, depending on how it's put on the spools at the factory. I have binned 4 bulk spools of line because of the amount of twist in the line as I've walked off a few yards just to check it. I'm not saying ALL lines do this, but it does happen.

Also be aware that some reels now don't have a back wind lever (notably Shimano's), so playing off the drag is the only option.
 
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Markywhizz

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rd115

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@rd115 ......Couple of things that'll probably help you as mentioned originally in your OP......Try to avoid winding in on a revolving spool (clutch set too loose) and keep a tight line to rod tip when baiting up.....
 

ukzero1

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I would think about the spin doctor, if the line twist is the opposite direction, it'll make it worse.
 

Markywhizz

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In my experience twist is always in the same direction because it is put in by the rotor when winding on. Casting doesn’t add or remove twist but it gets added every time you wind in. That’s why you need to get rid of it every once in a while.
 

Total

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^^ @Markywhizz ......Mostly agree with the above. (y) .......There however comes a time to replace the line with new line as inherent line twist becomes an 'expensive' pest/nuisance....:giggle:
 

mickthechippy

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there was a school of thought that glueing up the roller on your bail arm reduced line twist
 

ukzero1

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there was a school of thought that glueing up the roller on your bail arm reduced line twist

I might be wrong here but glueing up the roller would (over time) put a groove in the roller causing the line to fray. Just my thoughts.
 

ukzero1

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In my experience twist is always in the same direction because it is put in by the rotor when winding on. Casting doesn’t add or remove twist but it gets added every time you wind in. That’s why you need to get rid of it every once in a while.

And you'd be right, but, as I stated earlier, line twist can happen at factory level and depends how it's spooled. I have had line that's been spooled twisted and using the small spin doctor only made it worse. That's why I walk off about 100 yards and wind back on again. I've got to add though it's happened more with the bulk spools than the smaller ones.
 
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Lee Richards

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Wouldn't glueing defeat the point of having the roller there in the first place and as UKZ said not only cause a wear point in the roller but potentially weaken the line through friction.
 

nico12

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Ive tried the Gardner product and didn't find it help that much / at all - Is there a specific way to tie the bomb on?
 

Nicky Dodds

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Back in the day most bale arm rollers had a dish-shaped profile. When we eventually got rollers that revolved the theory was that it encouraged the line to climb up each side of the shallow dish profile as it was wound back onto the spool. Someone glued their roller and did indeed find that the increased friction stopped an amount of line twist due to 'wandering '. I doubt whether it was a total cure but it was a widely recognized mod so there must have been some substance in it. I remember going from the old shimano reels to the ones fitted with the new 'power rollers' and the difference was amazing even with brand new maxima straight off the spool. The power roller channeled the line to one side of the roller and kept it there in a groove. My spro red arcs rollers have a deeper 'v' shaped profile and they are very good except with new maxima. A lot of new reels have a slightly conical tapered profile that they just about get away with. Never studied daiwa reels properly but they have their own version. Personally I only buy reels that pay the extra attention to detail. There's loads of decent reels on the market that I have dismissed due to the line roller but I'm reluctant to chance it.
 

feeder_mike

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The Daiwa's Twistbuster Patent explains everything you need to know, google it and have a read. It's essentially a sloped roller that forces the line into a groove in the edge, from where it can't roll up the roller if that makes sense. Shimano copied it I believe but where forced to change to the Power Roller, this is basically the same but it's a V shape with the groove in the middle, again, once the line is in the groove it can't really roll up and down the roller.

I will only use a reel with some kind of anti twist roller as I believe (from (expensive) experience!) it makes a huge difference to reducing (not removing) line twist. Just my opinion of course :)
 

rd115

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I bought the Gardner spin doctor but haven't needed to use it, i've started locking up the drag and playing the fish on the backwind and ever since i've had no frap ups and if i dangle my feeder under the rod tip i get very little if any spin that would indicate twist.

Defeinitely working better all round, i was nervous anyway playing on the drag when clipped up incase i hit the clip and cracked off. wasn't a problem with the MAP ACS autoclip reel but i've since moved on to a lighter and better reel with a more traditional clip.

Probably get some use out of the spin doctor when i'm piking on the big pit baitrunners.
 

grey

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Couple of tips to reduce line twist. Don't allow the feeder to spin freely (as you mention), this is one of the quickest ways to actually create line twist. Play a fish on the clutch if you wish, but avoid using it excessively. Try to retrieve for recasting a little slower, especially the last 10m. Soak the line before you rig up - dry line is stiff and has more friction which encourages line twist - it usually takes about 10 mins for the mono to soak enough water to start to become limp (no need to soak fluoros, they don't absorb water, just wet them).

Make sure you take care respooling new line on a fixed spool reel to get the best results - soak the line (for at least a couple of hours) and wind the line on slowly with-as-little tension you can get away with. I find the pencil method is perfect for soft monos up to about 5lb, and over-the-lip method for stiffer monos over 5lb. The over-the-lip method actually actually puts one twist per (line manufacturer's spool) revolution into the line which makes for easier line management. This 'controlled coil' stops the line spewing uncontrollably off the reel's spool, which is a really useful tip when spooling up thicker monos and all thicknesses of fluoro.
 
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