Quiver tip tension

Zerkalo

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Just something I have been thinking about when legering on stillwater. I've been taught it's standard to have a slight bend in the quiver tip. Enough to see drop back bites. Also been told it can sometimes pay to slack line? Fishing for Tench on a heli rig with 4' hooklength and 2oz glass tip, I think it's fine to have a bend in the tip as you're fishing what's effectively a bolt rig, a tensioned line could aid with the bolt effect on this rig? That and you get sail away bites as the fish hook themselves anyway.

In what circumstances would you fish with a slack line and would you consider it on the above 4' hooklength heli rig?
 

robert d

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Just something I have been thinking about when legering on stillwater. I've been taught it's standard to have a slight bend in the quiver tip. Enough to see drop back bites. Also been told it can sometimes pay to slack line? Fishing for Tench on a heli rig with 4' hooklength and 2oz glass tip, I think it's fine to have a bend in the tip as you're fishing what's effectively a bolt rig, a tensioned line could aid with the bolt effect on this rig? That and you get sail away bites as the fish hook themselves anyway.

In what circumstances would you fish with a slack line and would you consider it on the above 4' hooklength heli rig?
Try it anytime and watch out for the line straighten 😉
 

Godber

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Fishing a slope. As the feed falls off a method obviously it gets lighter and any tension on the line could dislodge the feeder. You dont neccessarily need a slack line, more like a tight line but no tension on the tip.
Clear water conditions, a taught line rising from the feeder could spook fish. I try to make sure l hit the clip a couple of feet behind the rod rest, put a turn on the reel and place the rod on the rest leaving the line slack. A meter long length of flurocarbon tied to the end of your mainline being quite heavy stuff will sink behind your feeder.
If you fish a tight line with a 4" heli rig isn't there a chance the hooklength will be off bottom.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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If I were getting too many liners, particularly on The Method. Liners can move the feeder, something you don't want.

I'm not sure it would be an advantage for silvers, even tench. They seem to be fairly solitary fish and so it is unlikely you will get loads milling around the feeder.
 

ukzero1

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I prefer a little tension on the tip. Any drop back bites will show.
 

Zerkalo

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If you fish a tight line with a 4" heli rig isn't there a chance the hooklength will be off bottom.
I have thought this too. It's a crude looking rig, but seems to work, get brilliant bites on it, including drop backs. Seems to work just as well for silvers as it does for Tench as I didn't miss a bite.
 

squimp

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When I use that rig I fish it with a super tight line. It works best that way.

It doesn’t work so well at really short range probably for the reason mentioned earlier - the hooklink might be off the bottom. It also works best on a clean bottom or at worst very light weed.

So no quiver tip, rod pointed at the lead/feeder, tight line and a heavy bobbin on a 1” drop.

Make SURE you either have a baitrunner or a fighting drag etcetc as the bites can be fierce. Particularly from carp and tench.

Bream often swim towards the rod -so the bobbin falls to the ground - we call those bites ‘line cutters’.
 

Sam Vimes

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What Squimp said. I'd do the same with any kind of paternoster/helicopter/chod type set up. Whether using quiver tips or bobbins as indicators, I'd be primarily looking for drop backs with this kind of rig. However, a proportion of bites will tear off and give a straight pull/run.
 

Zerkalo

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Thanks for all replies. Lots to consider. (y)

It's a 2.5oz glass tip I've been using, very soft and slow taper for 2.5oz, on a Greys TXL 1.25lb Twin Tip rod. I reckon the softness and taper of the glass accentuates the bites I get, half of them drop backs (you can put a bit of tension in a soft tip), half of them screamers. It comes with 3 tips. 3.5oz Carbon I use for my Chub fishing, and 2.5oz and 1.5oz Glass. Been using the 2.5oz glass on this lake, it's a lovely rod. Could use a bobbin I guess, but it seems to work as well with the rod at around 45 degrees, quiver tipping. Have not felt the need for a baitrunner this way as I have the rod across my lap.
 

Total

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Thanks for all replies. Lots to consider. (y)

It's a 2.5oz glass tip I've been using, very soft and slow taper for 2.5oz, on a Greys TXL 1.25lb Twin Tip rod. I reckon the softness and taper of the glass accentuates the bites I get, half of them drop backs (you can put a bit of tension in a soft tip), half of them screamers. It comes with 3 tips. 3.5oz Carbon I use for my Chub fishing, and 2.5oz and 1.5oz Glass. Been using the 2.5oz glass on this lake, it's a lovely rod. Could use a bobbin I guess, but it seems to work as well with the rod at around 45 degrees, quiver tipping. Have not felt the need for a baitrunner this way as I have the rod across my lap.
Due to the nature of the bites on this rig (savage).....I'd seriously recommend a baitrunner or be prepared to order a new rod and reel at some point....The 'Law of Sod' will see to this....;)(y)
 

Markywhizz

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With a standard inline feeder setup I use a 0.25oz tip. Drop backs still register but the fish don’t feel much, if any, tension. I’ve had fish to 17lb on that setup without any problems. The tip bends a long way when landing decent size fish but all the muscle should be further down the rod anyway.
 

Zerkalo

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Due to the nature of the bites on this rig (savage).....I'd seriously recommend a baitrunner or be prepared to order a new rod and reel at some point....The 'Law of Sod' will see to this....;)(y)
Could do, when I go with my dad he'll be using a baitrunner for sure. :LOL: I don't clip up for that reason and rely on the rod.

With a standard inline feeder setup I use a 0.25oz tip. Drop backs still register but the fish don’t feel much, if any, tension. I’ve had fish to 17lb on that setup without any problems. The tip bends a long way when landing decent size fish but all the muscle should be further down the rod anyway.
Sounds heavy in comparison doesn't it, 2.5oz, but I don't have a problem with bites on this rig and although tips are meant to be rated accurately, the ones on this rod are well soft for their rating, probably due to being glass and their taper.
 

dave brittain 1

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Never - It's like fishing a float you need to be direct and in contact.

If as many people fished slack line as some suggest we'd be using swing tips. If people are worried about fish brushing the line there are other options such as Fluoro which sinks like lead, lead line leaders and back weights.

Other anglers like to see liners, it lets them know their bait is in the right area and roughly how many fish are in the peg.
 

squimp

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When we started using this rig for specimen bream fishing we used 8lb mono mainline. We got almost no liners even with razor tight lines and fish to mid doubles in front of us.

A few years later braided main lines started to become available and we experimented with those. The results were interesting - lots more liners and less fish on the bank.

Lots more liners because the braid sits higher in the water column and so is more likely to be bumped into by a fish.

Less fish on the bank (maybe) because the rig works differently with braid as compared to mono. I think it is about the stretch in the mono……
 

smiffy

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The only time I fish a slack line is when everything is dead still, no tow. Normally under match conditions and I know I’m struggling😉. Just sit there and watch the line hanging off the end of the rod.
Nowadays, unless there’s a good breeze and decent tow I won’t even bother fishing the feeder.
 
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