Quiver tip strength on rivers

Zerkalo

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Flatbed feeders would be perfect for this river, only thing is cost as I lose so many, I buy black caps in lots of 20. :unsure:
 

Arch

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Been on the upper Trent tonight, 4oz feeder wouldn't hold bottom, 6oz gripper lead was still being pulled of line with all the leaves catching the line. Needless to say I was using the avon top in my rods.
 

Silverfisher

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Flatbed feeders would be perfect for this river, only thing is cost as I lose so many, I buy black caps in lots of 20. :unsure:
One mate polluter haha

I couldn’t have feeder fished today if I’d wanted to as would have needed a feeder bigger than I could cast so was just as well that the float caught well!
 

Nunachuk

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As some of you will know, I fish the river Ijssel in Holland a lot, (or did before Corona) and my go to tip is 4 oz, although on the festivals I have 3 rods set up sometimes with up to 5oz, although I do use my home made feeders with legs.
 

dave brittain 1

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There are a number of considerations, depth flow, how far you are chucking and what breaking strain line you are using, not to mention the length of your rod and how it is positioned. The one thing nobody has mentioned is making sure that your set up is balanced.

On the Wye in low water, (summer and autumn levels), you can get away fishing for chub with a 14ft feeder rod, 2.5 oz tip, fishing 2/3rds across, using 6lb main line and a 2 oz feeder, casting the feeder level or upstream and feeding a decent sized bow in the line. Fish the same swim with water in and you'll need to step up to 8lb main line, a 3 or 4 oz tip and 3-5 oz lead.

A basic guideline is for every ounce of lead use the same rating tip, the bigger the bow, lighter the line and longer the rod the less lead you will need to hold. The biggest mistake many anglers make is tightening up too quickly which puts strain on the line and tip which leads to missed bites because the set up is too direct. Lightening the feeder and fishing a bow gives better bites and more positive hook ups.

A good skill to learn is critically balancing the feeder so that with a little practice, by fishing a bow and gradually decreasing it by tightening up you can bounce the feeder down the peg, (the trundling feeder), this can put a lot of extra fish in the net as can a 5ft hook length when wary chub are hanging back. It's a great way of fishing particularly if you live on or near rivers like the Trent and Wye
 

Zerkalo

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One thing to bear in mind with the lighter tips on the Greys rod I mentioned in this post, the 1.5oz and 2.5oz ones, they are glass so fairly useless on the river but even the 3.5oz tip has quite a bend in it when the river is up. I use 50g Black Cap feeders as they hold bottom in a snaggy peg, I would say more or less critically balanced there as 40g tends to go with the flow a bit.
 

ravey

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I think critically balancing the weight of the feeder is key, with the expectation that most of your bites will be drop-backs. If you can get hold of a copy of Bob Roberts levering book, he goes into great detail. I tend to use the carbon tips in the Daiwa feeder rods I have (11/13s), but also have couple which come with hollow tip sections, like Avon tops. Provided you balance the feeder weight to give predominantly stop-back bites using the bow in the line, seeing the bites shouldn’t be an issue, and most bites will result in a hook up. I often use 6lb Maxima, but will step up to 8 and Eve 10lb should the need arise. Archie Braddock’s book Fantastic Feeder Fishing has a chapter dedicated to the upstream feeder, and is another excellent source of info and guidance. Best of luck!
 

Zerkalo

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It's funny people mention drop back bites. I think I fish it slightly different, especially on the small weir I fish as I don't do much on proper rivers. But it's a short downstream cast for mostly Chub and Barbel and 95% of bites are wrap arounds. To get a drop back bite you have to fish slightly upstream and with a bow am I right? When the river is at normal level I don't feed out a bow as such but just let a natural bow develop as I put the rod on the rest.
 

carphauler

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Mine are 4oz and 5oz and a 1.75tc Avon top, don't particularly like using the Avon top so normally use a 4oz tip, it bends a lot when there's a lot of water on.
 

Zerkalo

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Matt Godfrey talks about it a bit here but he's fishing the Tidal Trent. Does the bow how I do on the weir but says he gets drop back bites so must be a bigger bow? Video starts at correct time again. Quite a bend in his tip too.

 

Silverfisher

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I've never really got on with bows. Obviously you've always got a bit of one but when you have to play out a big bow it's just a bit of a pain to have to keep doing. Thankfully most the time here you don't have to worry as the flow is fairly slow but once it gets up it can become a pain so you have to resort to bowing.
 

Zerkalo

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Someone asked me the other day about feeder fishing on rivers and I had to tell them I am no expert and don't know much about feeding out bows as I don't do much on the Severn unless for Barbel with heavy feeders and rods, in other words, not much for silverfish on big and fast rivers. But I have a feeling a bow comes in more in those situations as you have to use the lightest feeder you can get away with I would imagine to hit a dace or roach bite. Makes less of a difference when Chubbing on a weir.
 

Dropon

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There are a number of considerations, depth flow, how far you are chucking and what breaking strain line you are using, not to mention the length of your rod and how it is positioned. The one thing nobody has mentioned is making sure that your set up is balanced.

On the Wye in low water, (summer and autumn levels), you can get away fishing for chub with a 14ft feeder rod, 2.5 oz tip, fishing 2/3rds across, using 6lb main line and a 2 oz feeder, casting the feeder level or upstream and feeding a decent sized bow in the line. Fish the same swim with water in and you'll need to step up to 8lb main line, a 3 or 4 oz tip and 3-5 oz lead.

A basic guideline is for every ounce of lead use the same rating tip, the bigger the bow, lighter the line and longer the rod the less lead you will need to hold. The biggest mistake many anglers make is tightening up too quickly which puts strain on the line and tip which leads to missed bites because the set up is too direct. Lightening the feeder and fishing a bow gives better bites and more positive hook ups.

A good skill to learn is critically balancing the feeder so that with a little practice, by fishing a bow and gradually decreasing it by tightening up you can bounce the feeder down the peg, (the trundling feeder), this can put a lot of extra fish in the net as can a 5ft hook length when wary chub are hanging back. It's a great way of fishing particularly if you live on or near rivers like the Trent and Wye
 

dave brittain 1

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Zekalo you couldn't be more wrong, particularly on big rivers. It's not a case of using the lightest feeder, its a case of critically balancing the feeder so that when a fish picks up the hook and swims away instead or pulling the rod tip over 3inches, it only has to dislodge the feeder so the pressure on the bow creates a catapult effect springing back the rod tip, indicating the bite, while the dislodged feeder hooks the fish. To a large extent it's a self hooking rig and unlike fishing direct where you miss a number of bites, some which seem to be unmissable, nearly every fish is hooked properly, you don't even need to strike, just pick up the rod and start reeling in.
 

Zerkalo

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Zekalo you couldn't be more wrong, particularly on big rivers. It's not a case of using the lightest feeder, its a case of critically balancing the feeder so that when a fish picks up the hook and swims away instead or pulling the rod tip over 3inches, it only has to dislodge the feeder so the pressure on the bow creates a catapult effect springing back the rod tip, indicating the bite, while the dislodged feeder hooks the fish. To a large extent it's a self hooking rig and unlike fishing direct where you miss a number of bites, some which seem to be unmissable, nearly every fish is hooked properly, you don't even need to strike, just pick up the rod and start reeling in.

There's no difference between using the lightest feeder possible and a critically balanced feeder. You're being semantic. 🤷‍♂️
 

squimp

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Zerkalo; you need to realise that people here are trying to help you, yet you won’t help yourself.

Dave Brittain’s post 26 is a well constructed précis of how river feeder fishing works - yet you continue to dismiss his sage advice as inconsequential.

I’ve just replied to your post on ‘Pulse pro’ line. I’m trying to provide you with helpful information; in future I probably won’t bother.
 

Zerkalo

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Zerkalo; you need to realise that people here are trying to help you, yet you won’t help yourself.

Dave Brittain’s post 26 is a well constructed précis of how river feeder fishing works - yet you continue to dismiss his sage advice as inconsequential.

I’ve just replied to your post on ‘Pulse pro’ line. I’m trying to provide you with helpful information; in future I probably won’t bother.

I didn't dismiss any posts. Your post on Pulse Pro line was about a test done on breaking strains, useful information, but nothing to do with any experience of using the line or the question I asked.

This thread is an old post that was bumped up with what I wouldn't say was 'sage' advice, just general guidance on breaking strains of line and quiver tip strength for fish a river that is nothing like the river mentioned in the first post. Fair enough, this thread was started as a conversation piece, but there's nothing to say for example, I'd want to be using 8lb line on the weir just because it is up a bit if I was actually going to dismiss the post. Likewise, I can't trundle a feeder because of a snaggy bottom! So you're post just then borders obnoxious!
 
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