Question for the builders

spanky

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A bit odd this one, so please bear with me.

It's not uncommon round these parts for lots of houses to have extensions - given the cost of moving and especially stamp duty, it's cheaper to extend than move. There are always a handful of houses being revamped and usually with major add-ons.

However, lately there seems to be a new craze of reducing the old house to a partial shell and then rebuilding from there. At the moment one near me has had the roof and internal structure removed, the centre of the front wall is gone and the back walls taken out which has taken several weeks to do - so I was wondering if there is some reason to do this, rather than level the property and start from scratch. I.e. is there some tax break for doing it this way, or it make the planning permission easier or ??? I would have thought that the extra time spent on a controlled demolition would offset the brick work that has been saved.

It's not a listed building and it doesn't match any of the neighbouring houses, so no need to be consistent in that way.

Any thoughts on why it's being done this way?
 

Dave

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They would need planning permission to demolish an existing building and might not get permission to build a new property on the same site.

In addition building regulations when modernising an existing property are quite lax compared to those of a new build.
 

dry nets

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One near me has done it. They took the complete house down apart from one wall. It’s now rendered and you’ll never know the difference from old wall to new. So a good idea me thinks.

Someone else has been told off for flattening a pub without permission. He only got told off so he’s bung most have been a good one
 

Dave

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I was once involved in a project where the owner had been refused permission to demolish a bungalow on a large piece of land and to build a two storey house.

He eventually got permission to extend it to three sides and build dormers all round.
Once that was complete the once external walls bar one became internal walls and no permission was required to demolish them.
The ceilings were lowered, the roof raised and he ended up with a quite substantial chalet bungalow.
When I say quite substantial, the hallway alone had it's own fireplace, 34 spotlights, and a large central galleried staircase.
 
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