Question for experienced river match anglers - boundaries.

MarkV

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I was taught as a lad that the boundaries of you swim on a flowing river are from one yard above your peg and downstream to one yard above the next angler.

Have never thought of it as anything else.

Recently noticed anglers fishing UPSTREAM of their peg, if there is a close by juicy feature or they consider it easier/more beneficial.

Even more often I see anglers feeding upstream. I'm sure it can be tempting to do this to get your bait down but surely you're feeding into the other angler's peg.

Even seen it in online videos.

Are the boundaries as i've described ?

Personally as an occasional open angler I make a point of being carefull for fear of disqualification. Do I need to be ????
 

mickthechippy

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useally feeding upstream, is only required when the flow dictates that the said feed will drop and settle in your peg, this is a matter of judgement

otherwise all you are doing is feeding the other anglers tail end of his peg for him
 

davylad

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I personally would almost never feed upstream, as I believe the fish will come very close to where the food is going in. On rivers with a fairly strong flow such as the Trent, I would still feed the same, as a couple of foot down the flow rate will reduce. Indeed on the bottom it might be just a trickle, and quite regular I would feed down my peg. You usually can judge where to feed, depending on the couple of feet or so where you get most of your fish. That's only my opinion of course.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Unfortunately even on stillwaters I have had disputes regarding swim boundaries. More than once I have had anglers fishing outside their swim (halfway towards me) "because you can't reach that spot", its still not your swim! Or recently, "I thought you would be fishing towards the empty peg to your left". What if I do, your swim is your swim.

People are unwilling to challenge adjacent anglers, partly because those breaking the boundaries tend to be aggressive characters who you may not want to antagonise.

I'm afraid if I see wrongdoing I will challenge it.
 

smiffy

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I’m almost positive that the yard immediately upstream is/was no mans land,in that neither angler could fish it. The angler can only fish downstream to a yard above the next downstream peg.
Haven’t got a problem with feeding upstream as long as the angler isn’t fishing upstream.
Mind you. Cromwell weir has won the div1 national. Isn’t that an upstream chuck?😂😂
 
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MarkW

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Your peg extends from you down to the next angler but as you can fish a metre either side of the actual peg you can effectively rule out the metre above you. You certainly can't feed upstream.
Many years ago I won a tightly-pegged match with three fish, two big roach and a dace for 3-8, that were caught about a foot above the angler below.
 

rob6709

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Are you able to draw a level line based on the angle of the downstream peg to determine it's limits? If feeding slighlty upstream then I doubt they are actually FISHING upstream. B*ll sh... rule.
 

MarkW

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In the old days of major river matches and fairly tight pegging you would never loose feed upstream, simply because you had to try to keep your fish at a point in your swim where neither the angler above nor the angler below could pinch them off you, not that stopped people from trying.

Dace and chub, more so than roach, could be shifted up to four or five pegs at times by patient and consistent feeding.
 

RMNDIL

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I was taught as a lad that the boundaries of you swim on a flowing river are from one yard above your peg and downstream to one yard above the next angler.
It may vary club to club and/or venue to venue but my understanding has always been exactly this. Certainly every river match I've fished it's been the case.

You would NEVER cast upstream for any reason. Just because there is a feature a few yards above you doesn't mean you can fish there. It's in another angler's peg no matter how far above it he may be.

I've had brief discussions with adjacent anglers prior to the match to check who 'owns' what feature, looking across the river together, and it's never been a problem.
 

Arch

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I was taught as a lad that the boundaries of you swim on a flowing river are from one yard above your peg and downstream to one yard above the next angler.
Same for me. Although, I've mostly fished fast flowing rivers, so fishing upstream to a feature wasn't really possible.
 

smiffy

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Are you able to draw a level line based on the angle of the downstream peg to determine it's limits? If feeding slighlty upstream then I doubt they are actually FISHING upstream. B*ll sh... rule.
It’s been this way for years and I’ve heard very few anglers complain about it. Common sense normally prevails as far as boundaries are concerned. If you trot too far down your peg the downstream angler will let you know.
You normally get loads of room on river matches nowadays so there’s no real reason to feed or fish upstream.
 

MarkW

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I just cast on top of them...

I did once have the angler downstream of me on the Thames at Clifton Hampden casting a feeder - the river was around 35 yards across - so far UPSTREAM that his feeder was landing 5 yards above the top of my swim, i.e. in the swim of the angler above me, stopping me from fishing my swim properly. I walked down, explained what was happening and the solution was for him to face the other way so the feeder landed halfway down his swim.
 

PearTree

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I once had an old chap on the peg above me on one of the Shrewsbury opens running his waggler a good way down my peg. I had a quiet word with him about it and he was convinced that he wasn't encroaching on my peg. I asked him where he thought his peg ended and so he walked down and showed me, pointing at an angle which was clearly well down my peg. We were on a bit of a bend but **** me, he was either blind, stupid or trying to be clever. I 'put him' right as they say and advised him on how things were going to end up if he did it again. I don't go fishing to have a row but this chap was properly taking the ***s.
 

Nunachuk

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I've always been led to believe that on a river your peg ended one yard upstream of the next downstream peg- Fished a match once on the Weser (Germany) and the guy above me trotted down to one yard above my peg and struck with such foreocity that it made a massive splash every time, (before anyone says that he was just trying to raise his hookbait in gthe water, he wasn't, because he had a masive grin on his face every time that he did it)-Pure gamesmanship! Needless to say, he didn't catch a fish doing it and I mentioned my thoughts to him about it after the match!
 

tipitinmick

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Alway feed approximately 1m down stream from yourself. Frank Barlow taught me that many years ago. Another trick he taught me was to target the better fish by casting 3 - 4m downstream past the marauding small fish in my peg. How often do you cast only to find a tiny fish has snatched your bait before the float has settled ? Try casting past these fish and you will find that the stamp will be larger.
 

grey

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You always respect the angler fishing downstream.

You stop your baited hook short of where they're casting, causing them no interference - whether they're fishing straight out in front of themselves or fishing upstream on-the-bow. Unless there's specific match rules, it's their prerogative, as it is yours over the angler upstream of you.
 

breadflake

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What if any, rules are there in your club as to fishing from anywhere within the upstream and downstream boundries of the peg you have drawn
 

smiffy

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What if any, rules are there in your club as to fishing from anywhere within the upstream and downstream boundries of the peg you have drawn
Most of the clubs I’ve been a member of adopted the model match rules. NFA and now the AT and whoever was before the NFA.
They may add one or two of their own but boundaries have always been the same.
Commercials are a law unto themselves😂
 
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