Purpose of a 1000 sized reel?

Albert H

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I'm looking at a tiny Shimano Hyperloop 1000 reel for my little boy to use with a cheap Silstar Ian Heaps 11ft canal rod.

My intention would be to load it with 2ib maxima or similar.

Is this type reel intended for light waggler work & short rods, or is it intended for something else?
 

Albert H

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Thanks Ken.

It'll be fine on lighter lines for canal waggler work, though, do you reckon?
 

Sam Vimes

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For lure work on really short, light rods, I can understand the use of a 1000 sized reel. For the vast majority of match type coarse fishing, I can't. Only with the advent of 2500 models with significantly wider diameter spools (Stradic Ci4+ RA and Super GT RD) have I bothered with Shimano reels smaller than 3000 size. Tiny spools are not good for line memory or ease of casting. They also tend to be too light for rods in excess of 10'. The other thing to be wary of is that on some rear drag models, the drag doesn't really go low enough for light line fishing. I've run into this issue myself in the last couple of weeks. One drag click lower being too little, one more too much.
 

lp1886

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For course fishing they are only good for landfill. Even for the narrowest of canals I’d recommend a 2500.
 

rd115

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Go for a 3000 reel good allrounder.

Cadence do some low end reels that are very light and well made.

CS4 3000 only weighs 241g and is a lot of reel for the money.
 

Silverfisher

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Some 2500 reels are barely any smaller than other manufacturers 3000. Went to get my grandad a 3000 Sahara this morning for his birthday and they had none left so went for the 2500 as there was hardly any difference to your average 3000. Have to say I don't get the point of 1000 reels, for what they are designed for a 2000 will do the job perfectly well.
 

Arry

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For course fishing they are only good for landfill. Even for the narrowest of canals I’d recommend a 2500.
Rubbish.... I use one for ultralight jigging and drop-shotting... for that they are perfect... 1000 size reels do have a use
 

Ken the Pacman

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Thanks Ken.

It'll be fine on lighter lines for canal waggler work, though, do you reckon?
I personally would never go below a 2508/3000 size Daiwa reel for coarse fishing I cant see why you would want to at all because you are spoiling the reel for the sake of a very small weight reduction and one firms 3000 is not the same in another firms, bit like hooks and swivels they tend to make it up as they go along.
 

frothy

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UL for braid, no good for mono or course fishing. I’ve got a 500 size on a trout area rod...
 

grey

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A bit of a different opinion here to many responses so far.

Without doubt, you get better 'feel' for playing the fish with a smaller reel. The reason most of us use a 2500 for float and 4000 for feeder is because we're in the mind-set of wanting to cover as many situations as possible with as fewer reels as we can: we are quite prepared to buy a rod for a specific purpose, bit less likely to consider a different reel.

A 1000 size reel will balance a top-end 12ft light float rod or a 11ft canal rod perfectly, and will sharpen the whole set-up for better reaction. Obviously ideal if you're targeting silvers on a canal or lake.

No, they don't necessarily have the retrieve rate of a 2500, but they certainly have the power to land occasional bigger fish if required.

Yes, a 2000/2500 reel will do the job, but what a 1000 size reel offers is additional finesse, exactly the same as a light-float rod does over a standard float rod.
 
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Sam Vimes

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Without doubt, you get better 'feel' for playing the fish with a smaller reel. The reason most of us use a 2500 for float and 4000 for feeder is because we're in the mind-set of wanting to cover as many situations as possible with as fewer reels as we can: we are quite prepared to buy a rod for a specific purpose, bit less likely to consider a different reel.

Sorry, but I have rather a lot of doubts that the feel of playing a fish is any better on a smaller reel.

A 1000 size reel will balance a top-end 12ft light float rod perfectly, and will sharpen the whole set-up for better reaction. Obviously ideal if you're targeting silvers on a lake.

This essentially comes down to preference on how you believe a rod should balance. For me, a 1000 sized reel would have to be rather heavy to balance well on any rod much greater than 10' long. I doubt many would argue that an 11' Acolyte Ultra or an 11' 6" Sphere Hotrods are light float rods. I find 2500 reels balance perfectly well with them. As rods get longer, I actually prefer to up the reel weight incrementally to maintain my preferred optimum balance.

No, they don't necessarily have the retrieve rate of a 2500, but they certainly have the power to land occasional bigger fish if required.

High retrieve rates are of no value to me when float fishing. Faster is just more problematical. When it comes to power, what does it actually mean? Unless you are retrieving heavy leads or feeders, pretty much nothing, unless you are in the habit of trying to crank fish in rather than actually play them.

Yes, a 2000/2500 reel will do the job, but what a 1000 size reel offers is additional finesse, exactly the same as a light-float rod does over a standard float rod.

I'd go the other way. A 1000 size reel will undoubtedly do a job, but to what end? What actual advantage does a 1000 sized reel offer a float angler? I'm a long way from convinced that they offer a float angler anything much at all beyond disadvantages. A whole different ball game when it comes to ultra light lure fishing with short rods and braid mainlines.
 

Northantslad

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Would be fine for him imo, but may be as said a 2000/2500 perhaps for a bit of versatility if he gets into his fishing. Downside comes with one spool only, upside they are great little reels for the money, mine still going strong (got a couple) after about 5 years. Not too much reach needed either for smaller fingers-from spool to neck of reel. Shallow spool too on a smaller size, so less line bedding when he is mastering the important art of casting.
 

grey

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Sam, why not use a 4000 reel instead of a 2500? Using your argument, it will do what a 2500 does.

If you agree you don't get the same feel playing a silver with light line on a 4000 reel as you would a 2500, then you should understand the difference between a 2500 and 1000

1000's are typically a fifth lighter than a 2500, but just to clarify 'balance': you hold a reel in your hand when it's on the rod, therefore 'balance' is not about the fulcrum type effect: if you were to place a heavier 4000 on your 11' Ultra, it wouldn't actually unbalance the rod on a pivotal basis, but it would numb the feel of the rod, its action and slow your reaction. Too light-a-reel can cause the rod to waft, but an 11ft light rod will almost be balanced without any reel attached! Therefore anything beyond the lightest reel possible is excessive and eating into some of the benefits of using that particular rod.

Retrieve rate is important: it brings the tackle in quicker, it can keep up with a fish racing towards you etc. The retrieve rate on a 1000 reel is relatively slower when compared to 2500. It may spin at the same rate but being smaller, one turn of the handle will typically bring in about 60cm on a 1000 to 70cm on a 2500. Yes the HG's will retrieve more but that's when additional drum speed can become a potential problem.

Spool size is an issue: smaller spools do have the habit of creating more line twist, esp when playing fish on the clutch. However, they do have the advantage of managing light lines better and the coil cast from the 1000 passes through the guides easier creating slightly less (but surprisingly noticeable) friction when using very light lines.

Power is required whether you play the fish on the reel backwind or on the clutch, to suggest a reel's power is unimportant is ridiculous. And yes, most anglers do crank silvers in.

The advantage of a 1000 reel is as I said, finesse. Of course, there will always be those who don't understand the joy of finesse.
 

Lee Richards

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Although it's always interesting to read the technical side of things I think that Alberts OP is being lost somewhat.
He did mention that it was for a small boy and I am guessing the reason he asked if a 1000 would be okay is he is considering the lad (age unknown) has to hold the rod/reel and be able to use it.
Only NL seems to have picked up on that.
 

Sam Vimes

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Sam, why not use a 4000 reel instead of a 2500? Using your argument, it will do what a 2500 does.

Where it balances a rod better, I most certainly will use a 4000 reel, even for float fishing.

If you agree you don't get the same feel playing a silver with light line on a 4000 reel as you would a 2500, then you should understand the difference between a 2500 and 1000

But that's rather the point, I don't agree.

1000's are typically a fifth lighter than a 2500, but just to clarify 'balance': you hold a reel in your hand when it's on the rod, therefore 'balance' is not about the fulcrum type effect: if you were to place a heavier 4000 on your 11' Ultra, it wouldn't actually unbalance the rod on a pivotal basis, but it would numb the feel of the rod, its action and slow your reaction. Too light-a-reel can cause the rod to waft, but an 11ft light rod will almost be balanced without any reel attached! Therefore anything beyond the lightest reel possible is excessive and eating into some of the benefits of using that particular rod.

As I was saying, people obviously have a different ideas about what constitutes decent balance. Of the multitude of float rods available to me. I have none at all that would benefit from using a 1000 sized reel.

Retrieve rate is important: it brings the tackle in quicker, it can keep up with a fish racing towards you etc. The retrieve rate on a 1000 reel is relatively slower when compared to 2500. It may spin at the same rate but being smaller, one turn of the handle will typically bring in about 60cm on a 1000 to 70cm on a 2500. Yes the HG's will retrieve more but that's when additional drum speed can become a potential problem.

Retrieving float tackle slightly quicker offers little benefit in my eyes. In fact, all it really offers is the chance to induce more tangles.

Spool size is an issue: smaller spools do have the habit of creating more line twist, esp when playing fish on the clutch. However, they do have the advantage of managing light lines better and the coil cast from the 1000 passes through the guides easier creating slightly less (but surprisingly noticeable) friction when using very light lines.

I agree that spool size is an issue. However, as far as I'm concerned, low diameter spools used with monofilament offer only negatives. This gives rise to my preference for using the biggest diameter spool on a reel possible, provided that the reel concerned is not so big and heavy as to ruin the balance of the rod it's being used with. I can cast far lighter floats far greater distances with a reel with a wider diameter spool.

Power is required whether you play the fish on the reel backwind or on the clutch, to suggest a reel's power is unimportant is ridiculous. And yes, most anglers do crank silvers in.

This is a similar issue to those of people that regularly destroy gearing. What people do to reels to wreck gearing when float fishing is quite beyond me. I can only conclude that some folks play fish quite differently to me. What people need great (cranking) power in a float reel for leaves me at a complete loss.

The advantage of a 1000 reel is as I said, finesse. Of course, there will always be those who don't understand the joy of finesse.

I'm quite au fait with light line, finesse, float fishing, even for the bigger species where appropriate. I still don't see what advantage a 1000 sized reel offers when engaging in such fishing.
 

Pompous git

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A 2500 sized shimano will be fine even for a young boy. This size reel will do just about any fishing scenario from float to leger unless
very strong line is required. Also most shimano`s of this size will have an interchangeable spool, just what is it with maggot drowners?
The ability to make what are simple decisions complicated astounds, buy a shimano 2500 RD when you need another reel buy another
shimano 2500 and you will have spare spools. I should get paid for this.
 
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