Preston C Series 13ft Float vs Korum Glide 13ft Float

Canute Angler

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I'm returning to the water after an absence of some many decades and am looking for some initial guidance. I intend to float fish local rivers, canals and still waters but am not targeting a particular species of fish so am looking for an all-round rod. Until I get fully acclimated into the sport, I'm likely to buy a 2nd hand rod which is what leads me to the topic of this thread. I know there are far more options than just these 2 rod types but I've an opportunity to acquire one of these 2 rods to get me going so hoping to understand a little bit about these options if anyone has first hand-knowledge.

(Rightly or wrongly) I've a Shimano DL4000 and expect to use 5-6lb line with a slightly lighter hook-length.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions or guidance...
 

Silverfisher

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I don't know much about the Preston but the korum is a power float rod not an allrounder. It would be happy with 5-6lb line but both the rod and line would not be suitable for general float fishing plus the reel is bit big to for a 13ft float rod. I think the Preston is fairly commercial style in its action so again not an allrounder but probably the slightly better of the two.

So in summary if you really want to fish rivers, canals and stillwaters for mixed species I wouldn't get either of them. You just want a normal action normal powered float rod of which there are plenty but they don't tend to come cheap with a few exceptions.
 

Canute Angler

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I don't know much about the Preston but the korum is a power float rod not an allrounder. It would be happy with 5-6lb line but both the rod and line would not be suitable for general float fishing plus the reel is bit big to for a 13ft float rod. I think the Preston is fairly commercial style in its action so again not an allrounder but probably the slightly better of the two.

So in summary if you really want to fish rivers, canals and stillwaters for mixed species I wouldn't get either of them. You just want a normal action normal powered float rod of which there are plenty but they don't tend to come cheap with a few exceptions.
Thank you for your suggestions. I think I have some homework to do as I don’t really understand why a power float rod wouldn’t be suitable for general float fishing. There are nuances with fishing that I am a little out of touch with such as why would a reel be too big for a 13ft rod? I could do with going to fishing school by the sounds of it... 😀
 

Silverfisher

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Thank you for your suggestions. I think I have some homework to do as I don’t really understand why a power float rod wouldn’t be suitable for general float fishing. There are nuances with fishing that I am a little out of touch with such as why would a reel be too big for a 13ft rod? I could do with going to fishing school by the sounds of it... 😀
A too powerful rod will be too stiff for smaller fish so can bump them off the hook plus can struggle to cast smaller floats. Also if it's got a more commercial style action like I believe the Preston has it will have quite a slow action so won't be much good at hitting quick bites especially if at distance. The korum is designed for big river fish like chub and barbel with big floats and I think the Preston for fairly big floats for relatively small carp. I am guessing a bit on the Preston as to whether it's the one I think it is but fairly sure it is.

As to the reel a 4000 reel tends to be quite heavy so would unbalance all but the heaviest 13ft rods. IE the handle plus reel will weigh way more than the rest of the rod so the pairing will feel heavier in the hand that it actually is and make things like casting, striking and mending line more awkward.

There's no such thing as an allrounder float rod as there's always going to be a compromise somewhere. But there are rods that'll do quite a lot of things pretty well. Something marketed in the roughly 2-6lb line rating range with a 3000 reel with 4lb line will do a job on most fish and venues. Such rods sit between silver fish rods with say 2-4lb line ratings and power/commercial rods with say 4-8lb or even 4-10lb line rating so provide quite a good middle ground option.
 

Sam Vimes

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Don't get too hung up on rather arbitrary numbers assigned to reels. They mean very little in respect of weight.

For example, I have two different 2500 sized Diawa reels, on is 325g, the other 227g. the obvious difference is that one has a double handle, the other doesn't. However, with the handles removed you are still looking at 259g and 197g respectively.

I have two Shimano 2500 rear drag reels that look like there are only cosmetic differences between them. The physical dimensions are identical. One weighs 269g, the other 310g

I also have Shimano 4000 sized rear drag reels that are 358g, 334g and 312g respectively. Worth noting that the lightest 4000 I have is lighter than the heavy 2500 Daiwa and just 2g heavier than the heavier Shimano 2500.

If you are really bothered about reel weight, look to the specs and the material they are made from. The number and physical size are not a good indicator outside of models in the same range from a single manufacturer.
 

Silverfisher

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Don't get too hung up on rather arbitrary numbers assigned to reels. They mean very little in respect of weight.

For example, I have two different 2500 sized Diawa reels, on is 325g, the other 227g. the obvious difference is that one has a double handle, the other doesn't. However, with the handles removed you are still looking at 259g and 197g respectively.

I have two Shimano 2500 rear drag reels that look like there are only cosmetic differences between them. The physical dimensions are identical. One weighs 269g, the other 310g

I also have Shimano 4000 sized rear drag reels that are 358g, 334g and 312g respectively. Worth noting that the lightest 4000 I have is lighter than the heavy 2500 Daiwa and just 2g heavier than the heavier Shimano 2500.

If you are really bothered about reel weight, look to the specs and the material they are made from. The number and physical size are not a good indicator outside of models in the same range from a single manufacturer.
All good points. I can only speak from personal experience but all my 4000 reels are heavier by feel at least than all my 3000 and 2500 reels (all similar price points which could be the reason) and I wouldn't dream of putting them on any of my 13 or 14 foot float rods. The 4000 cadence might be alright on some 15ft rods though as its more a 3500 sort of size. Still think it stands off the rod a touch too far though.
 

Canute Angler

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All good points. I can only speak from personal experience but all my 4000 reels are heavier by feel at least than all my 3000 and 2500 reels (all similar price points which could be the reason) and I wouldn't dream of putting them on any of my 13 or 14 foot float rods. The 4000 cadence might be alright on some 15ft rods though as its more a 3500 sort of size. Still think it stands off the rod a touch too far though.
I ended up getting a Shimano 2500 reel to start me off. Your advice makes sense but like most things, I won’t truly know what works for me until I try a few options so starting small is probably best. The 2nd hand reel market is pretty active so I can always sell on any items that turn out to be wrong choices I’ve made. Thanks again!
 

trotter2

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I ended up getting a Shimano 2500 reel to start me off. Your advice makes sense but like most things, I won’t truly know what works for me until I try a few options so starting small is probably best. The 2nd hand reel market is pretty active so I can always sell on any items that turn out to be wrong choices I’ve made. Thanks again!
A 2500 reel is a nice size you will be OK with that.
 

Fartacus

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If you want an all rounder get a Shakespeare 13ft agility power float rod a superb rod indeed...
 

Canute Angler

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If you want an all rounder get a Shakespeare 13ft agility power float rod a superb rod indeed...
Thanks for the suggestion. I landed on a Drennan Red Range 13ft float rod which may or may not work out for the long term but i’ll bear your suggestion in mind.
 
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