Prescription drugs.

bryanh

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I suspect that more than a few fellow-Maggotdrowners of a certain age are in a similar position to me with a reliance on certain drugs to treat various conditions. Having had a stent fitted a few years ago,I am on the usual cocktail of heart medications - statins, beta blockers etc, together with Warfarin tablets for deep vein thrombosis.

Yesterday, the Daily Mail ran a full page story claiming that supplies of a whole catalogue of essential, drugs were in imminent danger of running out. They stressed that this is nothing to do with Brexit but is down to two factors, the first being production problems being encountered by various manufacturers. Secondly they claim that the said manufacturers are rationing supplies to the NHS due to it's insistence (trhe NHS's) on holding out for rock-bottom prices; seemingly the manufacturers can negotiate better deals with customers in other parts of the world.

The Mail followed up the story with a two-page spread in today's edition, reinforcing the doom and gloom. Strangely, there has been no mention of this potential drug shortage in any editions of the i newspaper,which is the only other daily I read, nor have I seen any reports on the various news channel.

Should we prescription drug dependents be concerned or is this the usual Daily Mail sensationalist bullshit?:unsure:
 

Lee Richards

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The Daily Mail are being accurate in this report as some drugs have been in short supply with stocks decreasing for a couple of years or more now.
In addition to the article some of this is down to Brexit,pricing events and future tariffs in America,end of production licensing terms and a fair bit to demand is outstripping supply.
My partner runs a high end care home and the group owners have a strict forward planning strategy to ensure that stocks and availability are tracked all the time.
 

banksy

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I heard on the radio today that the Government is banning the export of certain drugs such as HRT medications?
Must be something in it?
 

crackatoa

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My Mrs has had to source her own HRT drugs because of shortages in Chemists
 

Neil ofthe nene

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There was a recent report that for some unexplained reason one manufacturer of HRT medication was unable to produce any for something like 6 months.

Apart from that I'm sure the DM story is a hyped up version of the truth. I stopped buying that paper, in fact any daily paper, when they ran a centre page spread on "How To Spot a Yuppy".
 

spanky

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The supply chain for pharmaceuticals is very complex and highly regulated, and also very centralised, with only a few manufacturing plants globally for certain drugs. It only takes a minor problem somewhere down the line (or more correctly, earlier on in the supply chain) to create absolute carnage. A failed inspection can see a plant shut down for six months and a shortage of one chemical component (which might only be available from one supplier worldwide) will bring the production lines to a halt. It's not ideal, but this is the reality of the regulations under which the industry functions.

That said, I've never known the shortages to be as bad as they are at the moment - but a fair bit may well be traced back to a few common suppliers of raw chemicals.
 

RedhillPhil

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I suspect that more than a few fellow-Maggotdrowners of a certain age are in a similar position to me with a reliance on certain drugs to treat various conditions. Having had a stent fitted a few years ago,I am on the usual cocktail of heart medications - statins, beta blockers etc, together with Warfarin tablets for deep vein thrombosis.

Yesterday, the Daily Mail ran a full page story claiming that supplies of a whole catalogue of essential, drugs were in imminent danger of running out. They stressed that this is nothing to do with Brexit but is down to two factors, the first being production problems being encountered by various manufacturers. Secondly they claim that the said manufacturers are rationing supplies to the NHS due to it's insistence (trhe NHS's) on holding out for rock-bottom prices; seemingly the manufacturers can negotiate better deals with customers in other parts of the world.

The Mail followed up the story with a two-page spread in today's edition, reinforcing the doom and gloom. Strangely, there has been no mention of this potential drug shortage in any editions of the i newspaper,which is the only other daily I read, nor have I seen any reports on the various news channel.

Should we prescription drug dependents be concerned or is this the usual Daily Mail sensationalist bullshit?:unsure:
It's the Daily Mail. It thrives on scare stories
 

ukzero1

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Neither wifey or myself have had trouble with ours being in short supply.
 

Lee Richards

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It's easy to dismiss the Mail but in this case they are bang on and as I said there are some serious concerns within sectors that are dependent on having supplies.


 

Stephen

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The supply chain for pharmaceuticals is very complex and highly regulated, and also very centralised, with only a few manufacturing plants globally for certain drugs. It only takes a minor problem somewhere down the line (or more correctly, earlier on in the supply chain) to create absolute carnage. A failed inspection can see a plant shut down for six months and a shortage of one chemical component (which might only be available from one supplier worldwide) will bring the production lines to a halt. It's not ideal, but this is the reality of the regulations under which the industry functions.

That said, I've never known the shortages to be as bad as they are at the moment - but a fair bit may well be traced back to a few common suppliers of raw chemicals.
I work for the NHS (none medical) and this is so right.
 

mickthechippy

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The wench often has to wait and go back to the chemists to collect the full prescription of the cancer drugs she takes

very rarely does the pharmacy have the full amount or all the required drugs in stock

though they are normally there within a couple of days, being sourced from other branches of the chain
 

spanky

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The wench often has to wait and go back to the chemists to collect the full prescription of the cancer drugs she takes

very rarely does the pharmacy have the full amount or all the required drugs in stock

though they are normally there within a couple of days, being sourced from other branches of the chain

That's not surprising Mick. There are over 20,000 different product/strengths available for prescribing / dispensing in the UK (although a lot of these are devices rather than medicines). Even more if you include some of the more exotic hospital-driven drugs. You cannot expect a pharmacy to stock them all on the off chance they get a prescription (especially if it's an expensive item). They tend to stock the fast-moving lines and then order the rest through the main wholesalers who try to keep everything in stock. The big two wholesalers offer two deliveries a day, so usually a pharmacy can get what you need inside 24 hours.

If it's a common item and they cant get that, then that's the time to be worried.
 

160642fishing

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Nice to see the Daily Mail being defended by posters who clearly know the truth,I think some people on here would doubt the date on the top of the Mail.My wife was saying today that some prescribed medication would be stopped if it was available over the counter,one of our friends has been told this by their surgery,no doubt that's fine for people who would normally be paying for their prescription which I believe is £9 per item as the over the counter ones will probably be cheaper but where does that leave OAP's and people on benefits who now get free prescriptions.
 

breadflake

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My wife called in the chemist today to collect a repeat prescription for Indomethacin,
apparently they cannot find a supply anywhere and do not know why.
 

Arry

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Demand for painkillers and anti-depressants has hit an all time high in the last couple of years... as has been said, many Big Pharma companies have their own arrangements for supplies of actives, even down to opening production and micronising plants in the UK, so things are not as bad as they are made out to be.
Having retired from a GMS (Global Manufacture and Supply) plant last year, I saw first hand that many firms have been stockpiling actives and bulks for the last 3 years (mostly based on the Brexit referendum) if you were to look at Pharma GMS plants in the UK you'll find that warehouse space and offsite storage local to them is almost non-existent due to them stockpiling gear... it's a different matter for producers of "off patent" drugs however, as they rely on global supplies and this is the issue that the papers are reporting... it comes down to a number of factors... the slightest transgression from the "Orange Book" (drug production bible) and companies get their licence to produce pulled, even down to discrepancies in training manuals... The F&DA and MRCB (or whatever they call themselves these days) are bloody harsh and for good reason... remember Thalidomide anyone....?
 

Maesknoll

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It’s a wasteful business as well (maybe necessarily) as I have seen fairly large quantities of prescription drugs binned when someone dies or doesn’t need them anymore, there seems to be no way to redistribute them. Opened packets or bottles I can understand, but sealed boxes, still sealed in the dispensing chemists bag, all binned.
 

Arry

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Waste is a huge problem at manufacture too... depends on the complexity of the drug entity... one product I heard about had a 40% production waste tally and then folks wonder why drugs are so bleeding dear
 
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