Post Punk

Simon R

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
May 19, 2002
Messages
12,914
I hate it when people try to pigeonhole music acts as punk / postpunk / new wave

As for statements like 'Siouxsie And The Banshees should be considered post punk' I really think some people should brush up on their history lessons.
Siouxsie and Steve Severin played the 100 Club Punk Festival in 1976 - also on the same bill were the Pistols, The Clash, The Buzzcocks, The Damned and the Vibrators. They appeared on television as Siouxsie & The Banshees in 1977 (So It Goes) and did their first Peel session the same year.

Lots of bands were playing gigs and gaining a following without signing record deals - Stiff Little Fingers & UK Subs for instance - neither released any recorded material until 1978 but would either of those be considered post-punk?
The Stranglers are often ignored by many when discussing the early punk bands - possibly as they were generally a decade older than the other punk bands, had been gigging for years and could actually play their instruments. Rattus Norvegicus & No More Heroes are both classic punk albums up there with Never Mind The ********, Damned, Damned, Damned, Inflammable Material and the Clash debut.

I wonder if those who love to categorize music could state that any of these tracks were anything other than original punk - all these bands were playing during the brief period that the Pistols were together.







Only used this clip 'cos I was at the gig - unfortunately a lot weren't since the promoter didn't promote the gig and then ran off with the band's money:teeth:



At this gig too😁





This track dates from a couple of years after the Pistols imploded - any less 'punk'?


Simon
 
Last edited:

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
12,832
I don't mind categorising stuff. The above tracks with the exception of other tracks on The Slits album are all Punk to my understanding.

By all accounts, post punk was well defined early on and quickly started to become sets of cliches - see Joy Division being dubbed a 'Grey Overcoat' cult, but at least new wave and post punk are understandable terms, because when it first emerged it was almost called 'New Musick'. :LOL:

I've never really been into music journalism though, preferring to let the music speak for itself. I speak to a lot of people who are well into journalism though.
 

MountainAsh

Regular member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
132
The Stranglers are often ignored by many when discussing the early punk bands - possibly as they were generally a decade older than the other punk bands, had been gigging for years and could actually play their instruments. Rattus Norvegicus & No More Heroes are both classic punk albums up there with Never Mind The ********, Damned, Damned, Damned, Inflammable Material and the Clash debut.

This track dates from a couple of years after the Pistols imploded - any less 'punk'?


Simon
So true. Right time, right place for London Pub Rockers The Guildford Stranglers. Bass lines you’d risk the Wharfedales over...
 

Deejay8

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
1,006
I hate it when people try to pigeonhole music acts as punk / postpunk / new wave

As for statements like 'Siouxsie And The Banshees should be considered post punk' I really think some people should brush up on their history lessons.
Siouxsie and Steve Severin played the 100 Club Punk Festival in 1976 - also on the same bill were the Pistols, The Clash, The Buzzcocks, The Damned and the Vibrators. They appeared on television as Siouxsie & The Banshees in 1977 (So It Goes) and did their first Peel session the same year.

Lots of bands were playing gigs and gaining a following without signing record deals - Stiff Little Fingers & UK Subs for instance - neither released any recorded material until 1978 but would either of those be considered post-punk?
The Stranglers are often ignored by many when discussing the early punk bands - possibly as they were generally a decade older than the other punk bands, had been gigging for years and could actually play their instruments. Rattus Norvegicus & No More Heroes are both classic punk albums up there with Never Mind The ********, Damned, Damned, Damned, Inflammable Material and the Clash debut.

I wonder if those who love to categorize music could state that any of these tracks were anything other than original punk - all these bands were playing during the brief period that the Pistols were together.







Only used this clip 'cos I was at the gig - unfortunately a lot weren't since the promoter didn't promote the gig and then ran off with the band's money:teeth:



At this gig too😁





This track dates from a couple of years after the Pistols imploded - any less 'punk'?


Simon

I suppose labels of any kind are restricting and often unhelpful. I was trying to say that Siouxsie And The Banshees could sit easily on the list of bands that Zerkalo mentioned. In reality wether they are punk, post punk or whatever, is largely irrelevant. Certainly not worth arguing about. I do know my music history. The musicians that played the 100 Club were not the Banshees that we came to know. They actually weren't a proper band at all, and it was an impromptu performance featuring Siouxsie and Severin, but also Marco Pirroni and Sid Vicious that came about when one of the bands didn't turn up, and they decided to take to the stage and perform a half hour rendition of the Lords Prayer. They didn't even have a name. But when the Banshees recorded The Scream as a proper band, the music definitely had a different feel to the earlier punk bands. And with every subsequent recording, the Banshees moved away from being punk.The first Banshees record I bought was 'Happy House', quickly followed by the 'Kaleidoscope' album, then I went back and bought the first two albums. But I'm happy to admit that they were born out of the punk scene, and many classed them as punk. In fact most of the first flush of punk bands moved away from the punk scene and sound fairly quickly, to a more sophisticated music. Obviously the Sex Pistols never really evolved, as they split up, but bands like The Clash ,The Damned and The Stranglers were soon miles away from the punk sounds of their first albums. And as they matured, a whole load of new bands seemed to suddenly appeared to reclaim punk as theirs. Bands like Vice Squad, Discharge, The Exploited, Crass, Poison Girls and Anti Nowhere League, who were definitely punk in sound and spirit. Some occasionally to the point of being caricatures of punk. Most of these bands seemed to stay true to the original punk sound, and didn't want to evolve too much, although I remember Vice Squad became quite heavy metal as they went on.
 
Top