Pole floats

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Jun 29, 2020
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15
I am just about to start making my pole floats as I find it hard work getting the right floats or getting responses from the better float makers, as they always seem to be too busy.

I have bought the materials but just wondering what order is best to make to make the floats. Is it best to paint the body first and then put on the stem or the opposite way around and also what is the best way to insert the side eye, as I don’t like the spring eyes.
Any tips guys? Thanks
 

stephanie

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Sep 3, 2018
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i made a little jig for my float making the first part has 2mm holed drilled to different depths of 5.10,15 and 20 mm i use that for mounting the bodies on the stems to give the amount i either want left for mounting a bristle or even just paint the stem itself if i want extra sensitive floats. after setting the bodies i normally paint them. then mount bristles and top eyes and then its job done
 

carphauler

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I glue the bodies to the stems, paint the bodies till you're happy with the finish, glue the tip to the stem, write size on, paint final coats of clear, cut the stems. They would either be left plain or a double wound spring eye added last.
You would have to glue the side eye on before the body I think, never used them myself.
 

dave brittain 1

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Assuming you are using hollow tips, cut the tips and stems to length, allowing 5mm or so for the tip to slide over the stem. Use a quality quick setting epoxy such as araldite and glue the tip onto the stem.

Once set, if you are using twisted wire eyes, bond the wire eye onto the stem with a dab of superglue, noting it's best to use something like an electrical hook test clip to hold the wire eye in place against the stem before adding a dab of glue and leaving it to set as per the picture below.

If you are using a spring eye you can add it after bonding the body in place, again using quality epoxy.

Once the eye is secured remove the electrical clip and coat the float stem starting just below where the body will sit half way up to the eye, making sure to add a thin coat between the wire eye and float stem. Slide the float body up the stem and if you have applied the correct amount of epoxy as you push the float body up the stem and onto the eye there will be a small blob of surplus epoxy on the top of the float body at all times as you push it up the stem.

When you get the float body within 3mm of the top of the eye and the float tip which should be level with the eye, stop and clean the surplus epoxy off the top of the float body and stem leaving only the slightest smear of resin on the float stem. Push the float body up so it butts up against the float tip level with the float eye. Clean any surplus epoxy away which should leave you with a nice smooth joint between the float body and float tip, (if you look carefully at the pictures you can see the epoxy seam).

Add a very thin layer of epoxy at the base of the float wiping it clean with a wet finger/cloth to leave a nice thin seam at the base of the float. Leave the floats overnight and then paint the next day, noting that some paints and varnishes require several coats.

Note I use the 15mm twisted wire eyes. If you've bonded the body on correctly, even with pliers you have to apply significant force to pull the eye out. I don't like spring eyes as they are prone to deforming.

20210214_162510.jpg 20210123_145225.jpg
 
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Joined
Jun 29, 2020
Messages
15
Assuming you are using hollow tips, cut the tips and stems to length, allowing 5mm or so for the tip to slide over the stem. Use a quality quick setting epoxy such as araldite and glue the tip onto the stem.

Once set, if you are using twisted wire eyes, bond the wire eye onto the stem with a dab of superglue, noting it's best to use something like an electrical hook test clip to hold the wire eye in place against the stem before adding a dab of glue and leaving it to set as per the picture below.

If you are using a spring eye you can add it after bonding the body in place, again using quality epoxy.

Once the eye is secured remove the electrical clip and coat the float stem starting just below where the body will sit half way up to the eye, making sure to add a thin coat between the wire eye and float stem. Slide the float body up the stem and if you have applied the correct amount of epoxy as you push the float body up the stem and onto the eye there will be a small blob of surplus epoxy on the top of the float body at all times as you push it up the stem.

When you get the float body within 3mm of the top of the eye and the float tip which should be level with the eye, stop and clean the surplus epoxy off the top of the float body and stem leaving only the slightest smear of resin on the float stem. Push the float body up so it butts up against the float tip level with the float eye. Clean any surplus epoxy away which should leave you with a nice smooth joint between the float body and float tip, (if you look carefully at the pictures you can see the epoxy seam).

Add a very thin layer of epoxy at the base of the float wiping it clean with a wet finger/cloth to leave a nice thin seam at the base of the float. Leave the floats overnight and then paint the next day, noting that some paints and varnishes require several coats.

Note I use the 15mm twisted wire eyes. If you've bonded the body on correctly, even with pliers you have to apply significant force to pull the eye out. I don't like spring eyes as they are prone to deforming.

20210214_162510.jpg 20210123_145225.jpg
Dave that’s brilliant, totally different that what I was going to do and it looks much neater. I was going to wrap it with line but wrap it around the body rather than the stem (there is a video from will raison somewhere that I was going to replicate).
I much prefer yours.
 
Joined
Jun 29, 2020
Messages
15
Assuming you are using hollow tips, cut the tips and stems to length, allowing 5mm or so for the tip to slide over the stem. Use a quality quick setting epoxy such as araldite and glue the tip onto the stem.

Once set, if you are using twisted wire eyes, bond the wire eye onto the stem with a dab of superglue, noting it's best to use something like an electrical hook test clip to hold the wire eye in place against the stem before adding a dab of glue and leaving it to set as per the picture below.

If you are using a spring eye you can add it after bonding the body in place, again using quality epoxy.

Once the eye is secured remove the electrical clip and coat the float stem starting just below where the body will sit half way up to the eye, making sure to add a thin coat between the wire eye and float stem. Slide the float body up the stem and if you have applied the correct amount of epoxy as you push the float body up the stem and onto the eye there will be a small blob of surplus epoxy on the top of the float body at all times as you push it up the stem.

When you get the float body within 3mm of the top of the eye and the float tip which should be level with the eye, stop and clean the surplus epoxy off the top of the float body and stem leaving only the slightest smear of resin on the float stem. Push the float body up so it butts up against the float tip level with the float eye. Clean any surplus epoxy away which should leave you with a nice smooth joint between the float body and float tip, (if you look carefully at the pictures you can see the epoxy seam).

Add a very thin layer of epoxy at the base of the float wiping it clean with a wet finger/cloth to leave a nice thin seam at the base of the float. Leave the floats overnight and then paint the next day, noting that some paints and varnishes require several coats.

Note I use the 15mm twisted wire eyes. If you've bonded the body on correctly, even with pliers you have to apply significant force to pull the eye out. I don't like spring eyes as they are prone to deforming.

20210214_162510.jpg 20210123_145225.jpg
Dave just one other thing, I was going to insert the carbon stem further up the hollow bristle, to about 5- 10mm from the top. Just to make it more sensitive, so it is almost part solid, part hollow. From your experience, have you tried this and do you think this will affect the balance of the float?
 

dave brittain 1

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Apr 17, 2004
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Dave that’s brilliant, totally different that what I was going to do and it looks much neater. I was going to wrap it with line but wrap it around the body rather than the stem (there is a video from will raison somewhere that I was going to replicate).
I much prefer yours.
Steve all the components I use you can get from ebay, (same supplier for all parts).

Regarding the stem you need a minimum of 5mm protruding into the hollow tip. I usually leave around 1cm hollow as I'm old school and like to see bites develop when carp fishing. For silvers I use finer tips and dot them down according to conditions.
 

carphauler

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Mar 19, 2012
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Dave just one other thing, I was going to insert the carbon stem further up the hollow bristle, to about 5- 10mm from the top. Just to make it more sensitive, so it is almost part solid, part hollow. From your experience, have you tried this and do you think this will affect the balance of the float?
You'll lose the benefit of having a hollow top by doing that, 10mm into the tip is enough, but there's nothing wrong with experimenting if that's what you want to do.
 

Me and my lad

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I like that way dave brititain 1. I have snipped the eye stem down a screwed into the body after dipping in epoxy for ages now, been using a tiny set of craft pliers.
 
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You'll lose the benefit of having a hollow top by doing that, 10mm into the tip is enough, but there's nothing wrong with experimenting if that's what you want to do.
Yes you lose the benefit to a point but on the flip side you gain the sensitivity of a solid bristle. Bit of a hybrid and its just a thought that’s all
 

Me and my lad

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I just use acrylic but use very fine coats. Normally give it 3, by building it up it will give a better result. Just use a light touch
 

ukzero1

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Gents I will post pictures of what I have done and some of the things I have learnt but I am struggling with the getting the paint finish right. It’s much harder than I thought . Any tips for getting It right @dave brittain 1
I dip mine rather than use a brush. Mix your paint with the appropriate thinner at a 50/50 mix, dip once, bring the float out very slowly to avoid drips/runs, let it dry then dip again. Leaves a smooth finish and no patchy bits. Before painting, give the floats a coat of sanding sealer.
 

robert d

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Assuming you are using hollow tips, cut the tips and stems to length, allowing 5mm or so for the tip to slide over the stem. Use a quality quick setting epoxy such as araldite and glue the tip onto the stem.

Once set, if you are using twisted wire eyes, bond the wire eye onto the stem with a dab of superglue, noting it's best to use something like an electrical hook test clip to hold the wire eye in place against the stem before adding a dab of glue and leaving it to set as per the picture below.

If you are using a spring eye you can add it after bonding the body in place, again using quality epoxy.

Once the eye is secured remove the electrical clip and coat the float stem starting just below where the body will sit half way up to the eye, making sure to add a thin coat between the wire eye and float stem. Slide the float body up the stem and if you have applied the correct amount of epoxy as you push the float body up the stem and onto the eye there will be a small blob of surplus epoxy on the top of the float body at all times as you push it up the stem.

When you get the float body within 3mm of the top of the eye and the float tip which should be level with the eye, stop and clean the surplus epoxy off the top of the float body and stem leaving only the slightest smear of resin on the float stem. Push the float body up so it butts up against the float tip level with the float eye. Clean any surplus epoxy away which should leave you with a nice smooth joint between the float body and float tip, (if you look carefully at the pictures you can see the epoxy seam).

Add a very thin layer of epoxy at the base of the float wiping it clean with a wet finger/cloth to leave a nice thin seam at the base of the float. Leave the floats overnight and then paint the next day, noting that some paints and varnishes require several coats.

Note I use the 15mm twisted wire eyes. If you've bonded the body on correctly, even with pliers you have to apply significant force to pull the eye out. I don't like spring eyes as they are prone to deforming.

20210214_162510.jpg 20210123_145225.jpg
Very nice floats .
 

crayfishtraps

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couple of questions...you say you dip float bodies in paint,,,..instead of painting by brushes..what do you use to stop paint going into hole for stem...and what do you use to hang them to dry?
 
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