Pole floats

Steve88

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Looking at starting making my own rigs this weekend.

I'm totally lost in regards of which float to use for what scenario.

Can anyone give me a quick breakdown/advice as to which floats I should get. Ideally looking to have rigs for, shallow, edge and on the deck, fishing commercials for mixed fish.
 

chefster

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Check out this guy, it a small range, very uncomplicated, and Brian is very helpful, they’re very well priced too,you will get a million answers on this question.at the end of the day you have to make the decision ?These floats are super strong, shot up perfect and accurate every time..Gazza BEF09F48-5C51-470C-B013-6FADCAEA3A97.jpeg
 

alanmac

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Sorry but spring eyes just don’t do it, too many times snapped line, sure the floats are fine quality and in most cases will do the job but are not totally reliable in match situations, just ask Mick Wilkinson.
 

chefster

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Sorry but spring eyes just don’t do it, too many times snapped line, sure the floats are fine quality and in most cases will do the job but are not totally reliable in match situations, just ask Mick Wilkinson.
I use Malmans for most of my fishing, but I use these for big carp, I’ve never had a problem with line breaking, and you don’t have to name drop, instead why don’t you offer some advice???????‍♂️?‍♂️
 
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robert d

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I use Malmans for most of my fishing, but I use these for big carp, I’ve never had a problem, if you know mick Wilkinson why don’t you just ask him ?‍♂️you talk about match situations, but are asking a very basic question??????
I've used loads of spring eyes and never once been broken, not once . Malman floats are top quality as Chefster has said he uses ,the others look good for carp . I can also vouch for Nick Gilbert's floats ,I use mainly the fibre glassed stems but if I want a more delicate approach his carbon or memory wire floats are very good to.
 

robert d

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Looking at starting making my own rigs this weekend.

I'm totally lost in regards of which float to use for what scenario.

Can anyone give me a quick breakdown/advice as to which floats I should get. Ideally looking to have rigs for, shallow, edge and on the deck, fishing commercials for mixed fish.
If you look for Nick Gilbert he will sort you out ,hes on this site or look online Nick Gilbert floats .
 

Steve88

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If you look for Nick Gilbert he will sort you out ,hes on this site or look online Nick Gilbert floats .
Thanks, it's more of a case I don't know what body to use for what type of fishing, do I need a rugby ball for X or a chianti, I understand the weights 0.1g for a foot of water, just not the shapes.
 

adriang

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Check out Clive Bransons YouTube channel, he recently did one on pole floats that sounds like it would be useful.
 

robert d

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If you look for Nick Gilbert he will sort you out ,hes on this site or look online Nick Gilbert floats .
As a rule you want short floats in most margin swims about .4 or .3 ,you can use the same floats across to islands. For up in the water f1 fishing use as light s float as you can get away with . For deeper swims upto 5 or 6 foot I use longer .4 or .5 floats or if it's very windy even heavier floats .
 

robert d

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Thanks, it's more of a case I don't know what body to use for what type of fishing, do I need a rugby ball for X or a chianti, I understand the weights 0.1g for a foot of water, just not the shapes.
The fatter the body the more stable in wind usually ,which goes hand in hand with the weight ,you need more shot to set the float right . Slimmer bodies are good in calmer situations and shy biting fish ... that's a generalization I work on
 
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Steve88

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As a rule you want short floats in most margin swims about .4 or .3 ,you can use the same floats across to islands. For up in the water f1 fishing use as light s float as you can get away with . For deeper swims upto 5 or 6 foot I use longer .4 or .5 floats or if it's very windy even heavier floats .
All in the same shape or do you use different shapes for in the margins and shallow?
 

robert d

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All in the same shape or do you use different shapes for in the margins and shallow?
I try and use slimmish floats in the margin and across and for shallow fishing ..bigger body for deeper or windy conditions
 

pies

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Personally i woud stick with just two styles to start. I’m assuming your fishing lakes. If carp or f1’s are target i woud use a spring eye type. There are a couple of different versions. you can use spring eyes for silvers as well I’ve had no problems at my level ( club angler )
body style i would have elongated rugby ball and a more rounded,the more rounded are used when conditions are not ideal,i.e a heavy tow of a good blow
stems i would start out with just carbon as you can fish these on the drop or on bottom. wire stems are better in bad conditions as are more stable.But for starting out carbon is a good allrounder IMHO
Tip diameter i use about 1.5 to 2.5mm.thinner tips more sensitive bigger tips work well with bigger baits.
whichever way you chose keep it simple you can easily have various patterns on different lines.
As for line the rig body is not to important for gettig bites and thinner lines tangle easily. I would pick a decent line your local shops stocks for the body, i use reflow power 0.17 for non carp and f1 and 0.19 for my carp rigs.
as for where to get the floats I use Nick Gilbert as he‘s local and floats are quality but there are plenty of places you can buy quality floats. Lee Kerry has a good video on making pole rigs
 

Neil ofthe nene

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In my Beginner's Guide I say this about pole floats

Pole Floats

Strictly speaking you can use just about any float on a pole. When I refer to pole floats though I am talking about the accepted bristle topped or dome topped floats made specifically for pole fishing.

Because the variations and range of floats available is large and this is a beginner's guide I am not going to try and explain all of them. As you develop and learn so you will discover what you prefer and what works on your venues.

Do not get tempted to buy a vast range of floats in different sizes. Start with one or two patterns in a couple of sizes and go from there. When I say sizes, I see little point in having floats that are just 0.2 grammes different in weight. 0.5 and 1 gramme floats will cover most situations. If targeting silvers on a lake up to four to five foot in depth or a slow moving, shallow canal then some floats of around 0.2g may be suitable. For fishing up in the water or margins then shorter dibber type floats are an advantage.

There is an accepted rule of thumb that for still waters like lakes and canals your float should carry 0.1 gramme per foot of depth. This is a guide and not an absolute. I will happily use a 0.75 gramme float in four foot of water if the water is flowing like a canal when the lock gates open. 0.2g in five or six foot if it is a calm day on a lake or canal can give me the sensitivity to spot delicate bites.

The important thing is that the float allows you to control the presentation and the bait.

If you wish to read an explanation of different patterns and materials then follow the link below and read the first part of the article by Nemesis. It is not exhaustive but it covers the basics.

Beginners Guide to Pole Rigs.



My blog on keeping things simple shows the limited range of pole floats I use.



And for what it is worth I add spring eyes to my carp floats and have never had an issue.
 

Bob Astill

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I use Gerry Woodcock floats if they were good enough for Ivan Marks they are good enough for me :) he does a self assembly kits as well just stick them together and your ready to go 20 quality floats for around £10 you cant go wrong.

 

2lbRoach2hand

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I have simplified my commercial floats down to 5 patterns that cover absolutely everything wherever I go. Guru MW Diamonds (glass stems) for on the deck, Drennan Crystal Margins for obviously margins and farbank/islands etc, KC Carpa 1's (slim body/carbon stem) for fishing through the water, especially that close swim (top kit + 2 or 3 sections) , KC Carpa slappa's for my shallow fishing and Chianti's for any finesse work or when fishing maggot/caster.

Firstly - the Mick Wilkinson Guru Diamonds are a superb and great stable float. Nice long glass stem which really helps fishing on the deck and especially in deeper water. Follow #neilofthenene's advice on float size/depth of water etc and take the tow into consideration but normally I carry these in 0.2g to 0.6g. You may want to go heavier if it is deep where you fish. Steve Ringer originally designed these floats with Mick Wilkinson back in the day to fish meat on the deck.

The Drennan Crystal Margin floats are a great little float. They do have a spring eye but I have never had any problems with them at all and I've had some serious bagging sessions and huge carp on them. I just love how they work - nice and short with a thick visable tip which is important for the far bank or tight to an island. I carry these from 0.2g to 0.5g. Don't be afraid to go heavy in the margins or tight across. Better to read the bites and make sure you are striking into proper bites and the thick bristle on this float helps loads with that.

KC Carpa 1's - perfect body shape (long and slim elongated rugby ball shape and decent thick bristle). I like these slim floats for helping me to read bites. The carbon stem allows you to do this perfectly and the thicker bristle allows for bigger baits like pellet, corn and meat. By simply laying the rig in and holding tight to the float, you can read the float and detect bites on the drop. Love using these on my close line and a great float for bagging! I carry these from 4 x 10 up to 4 x 16. Basically a big bait/bagging version of the Chianti!

For the majority of my shallow fishing, especially when you are slapping a pellet or piece of meat etc, the KC Carpa Slappa floats are hard to beat. Line through the float body just stops any tangles whatsoever and they will suspend any bait. Lovely thick wire stem helps them cock straight away. In my eyes they are the perfect shallow float. I really only use them in 0,2g and 0.3g. I also carry a few jigger floats for shallow fishing but that's a different topic in itself!

Finally, the Preston Chianti's. I have used these floats for years! In my opinion, for winter commercial fishing, general silvers on commercials at any time of year and also when fishing maggot/caster for whatever species these floats are amazing. Lovely slim body, carbon stem (again to help with fishing on the drop) and a sensible and visable bristle make these amazing little floats. I carry these from 4 x 10 up to 4 x 18.

Just a mention on float stems - I never normally use wire on a commercial. I know some guys do but this is mainly in winter. Wire is great for stability but can bend out of shape and is generally not suited to bagging. Glass stems are the best of both worlds when it comes to durability and stability.

Obviously the floats I have mentioned above are my personal choice which I have confidence in. There are many floats of the same sort of shape on the market by several manufacturers and it will be up to you to use some and see what you prefer. Just stick to the general rules regarding body shape and stems as I have mentioned above. Enjoy!!
 

Anglingman

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I have simplified my commercial floats down to 5 patterns that cover absolutely everything wherever I go. Guru MW Diamonds (glass stems) for on the deck, Drennan Crystal Margins for obviously margins and farbank/islands etc, KC Carpa 1's (slim body/carbon stem) for fishing through the water, especially that close swim (top kit + 2 or 3 sections) , KC Carpa slappa's for my shallow fishing and Chianti's for any finesse work or when fishing maggot/caster.

Firstly - the Mick Wilkinson Guru Diamonds are a superb and great stable float. Nice long glass stem which really helps fishing on the deck and especially in deeper water. Follow #neilofthenene's advice on float size/depth of water etc and take the tow into consideration but normally I carry these in 0.2g to 0.6g. You may want to go heavier if it is deep where you fish. Steve Ringer originally designed these floats with Mick Wilkinson back in the day to fish meat on the deck.

The Drennan Crystal Margin floats are a great little float. They do have a spring eye but I have never had any problems with them at all and I've had some serious bagging sessions and huge carp on them. I just love how they work - nice and short with a thick visable tip which is important for the far bank or tight to an island. I carry these from 0.2g to 0.5g. Don't be afraid to go heavy in the margins or tight across. Better to read the bites and make sure you are striking into proper bites and the thick bristle on this float helps loads with that.

KC Carpa 1's - perfect body shape (long and slim elongated rugby ball shape and decent thick bristle). I like these slim floats for helping me to read bites. The carbon stem allows you to do this perfectly and the thicker bristle allows for bigger baits like pellet, corn and meat. By simply laying the rig in and holding tight to the float, you can read the float and detect bites on the drop. Love using these on my close line and a great float for bagging! I carry these from 4 x 10 up to 4 x 16. Basically a big bait/bagging version of the Chianti!

For the majority of my shallow fishing, especially when you are slapping a pellet or piece of meat etc, the KC Carpa Slappa floats are hard to beat. Line through the float body just stops any tangles whatsoever and they will suspend any bait. Lovely thick wire stem helps them cock straight away. In my eyes they are the perfect shallow float. I really only use them in 0,2g and 0.3g. I also carry a few jigger floats for shallow fishing but that's a different topic in itself!

Finally, the Preston Chianti's. I have used these floats for years! In my opinion, for winter commercial fishing, general silvers on commercials at any time of year and also when fishing maggot/caster for whatever species these floats are amazing. Lovely slim body, carbon stem (again to help with fishing on the drop) and a sensible and visable bristle make these amazing little floats. I carry these from 4 x 10 up to 4 x 18.

Just a mention on float stems - I never normally use wire on a commercial. I know some guys do but this is mainly in winter. Wire is great for stability but can bend out of shape and is generally not suited to bagging. Glass stems are the best of both worlds when it comes to durability and stability.

Obviously the floats I have mentioned above are my personal choice which I have confidence in. There are many floats of the same sort of shape on the market by several manufacturers and it will be up to you to use some and see what you prefer. Just stick to the general rules regarding body shape and stems as I have mentioned above. Enjoy!!
great info (y) but a quick update on wire....black nickel titanium is memory free so does not bend out of shape making them much more user friendly for commercial work
 
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