Pole Float Tips

robinta

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So, I feeling this may open a box of dendrobaenas, but here goes..

What's your opinion on shorting your float and tips for winter fishing.

(this is intended for pole floats, but could also relate to wagglers too)

To put into context, I've just watched a guru vid with Matt Godfrey fishing at The Oaks in Yorkshire for silvers, where he is using pole floats with tips that seem to be about 2mm thick, but dotted down to a pimple.

Now, I am never going to he a quarter the angler matt is, but I only ever use tips this thick in summer (and even then only with big fat baits or on margin rigs) and at this time of year am planning to use 1.2 or even 1mm with about a cm showing.

So, this is more as a straw poll than anything, as everyone will have a different opinion.

However, I think back to my days of bits fishing when a bristle over 1mm would have seemed like a Lighthouse in the water, and fishing that kind of float just seems counter intuitive.

Any thoughts?
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Over the last couple of Winters I have been using a 0.2g float that happens to have a 2mm bristle (commercials). My normal Winter float for commercials has a 1.2mm bristle but is 0.5g. The only 0.2g float that I have and would use on a commercial has the thicker bristle*. But dotting down, IMHO, makes it just as sensitive as something thinner but with more showing. The light float will be used in perfect or near perfect conditions and will be dotted down as far as I can get it, I estimate with 2mm showing. But even with the thinner bristle I would do the same and rarely have as much as a centimetre showing.

With the bristle of either float dotted down I am going to react to any disappearance and, as I mentioned a couple of days ago, even to a miniscule but instant dip of the float. I believe that with 1cm of a thin bristle showing you are not going to recognise a 2mm movement as a bite. Hence my thread on missing or not recognising bites.

There are times I will have more bristle showing. Normally that will be when I want the float to impart movement to the bait. This may be due to wind catching the bristle that acts like a sail, or by the more bouyant rig being able to move the bait with a slight tow. That movement can be deadly when fishing corn skins.

The 1.2mm bristle is prone to breaking when I pull out of a foulhooked fish whereas the 2mm survives. Another plus point in favour of the thicker bristle.

*I have a 0.2g silvers/canal float that has a 0.7mm bristle. This would not be robust enough for commercials.
 

ukzero1

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Why shorten it? just dot it down. Tips and stems are the length they are for a reason, to keep the float balanced. trim one or the other and that balance will alter. To get it to balance again it means altering the shotting. Just dot it down and save all the faff, and possibly a ruined float.
 
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chefster

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Don’t see the point of shortening the tips when you can dot then right down
People cut down floats for various reasons, ie they want a shorter float for a certain application,or because they want it to settle quicker , yes it does affect the shotting, but if it is thought out properly it won’t upset the balance ..A thicker tip, whether it is dotted down or not will offer more resistance to a fish than a thinner tipped float 🤷‍♂️
 

Me and my lad

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In my mind it is the material that counts. Drennan pinkie floats used the have a thicker cane tip and were sensitive. For winter I have made some floats with solid slim tips. These are my go to winter float...at the moment. Its a confidence thing
 

OldTaff

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People cut down floats for various reasons, ie they want a shorter float for a certain application,or because they want it to settle quicker , yes it does affect the shotting, but if it is thought out properly it won’t upset the balance ..A thicker tip, whether it is dotted down or not will offer more resistance to a fish than a thinner tipped float 🤷‍♂️

I see - my follow up question to that is whilst i agree a thicker tip offers more resistance than the thinner tip but shortening a thick tip will surely not reduce the resistance of that tip. If you have say 3mm of a float tip above the water then whether that is done by shortening the tip or dotting down the degree of resistance on a bite remains the same doesn’t it?
 

chefster

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I see - my follow up question to that is whilst i agree a thicker tip offers more resistance than the thinner tip but shortening a thick tip will surely not reduce the resistance of that tip. If you have say 3mm of a float tip above the water then whether that is done by shortening the tip or dotting down the degree of resistance on a bite remains the same doesn’t it?
That’s correct, I’m not advocating using a 2mm thick tipped float in the winter, personally I think it offers too much resistance to very shy bites, I use as thin as I can get away with seeing, depending on how far out I’m fishing, light conditions, ripple,etc
 

OldTaff

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That’s correct, I’m not advocating using a 2mm thick tipped float in the winter, personally I think it offers too much resistance to very shy bites, I use as thin as I can get away with seeing, depending on how far out I’m fishing, light conditions, ripple,etc

Thanks for clarifying, appreciate that
 

chefster

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Thanks for clarifying, appreciate that
I forgot to say 2mm tips are ok for dobbing bread, as you’re fishing the bait off the bottom, and bites just usually bury , also you need the visibility against far bank cover etc...I also forgot to add , these are only my opinions based on the fishing I do, which is mostly for F1,s and carp in the winter
 
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Jonnie987

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I’ve made some floats up with different bristle sizes to see if we can exaggerate the tiniest of F1 bites this winter
In good conditions the .8 solid bristle is just as visible when dotted to a pimple
As a 1.2 hollow
I think it is more responsive instead of a flicker on the bristle which is the normal indication it does bury
Accurate plumbing of depth and shotting the bristle as far down as is possible for the conditions is where I would start
I don’t believe cutting the bristle down will benefit anything
 

Northantslad

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There are some of the top anglers who do it, then they get involved in production, hence there is sufficient choice available on the market i would think to avoid having to chop them about.
 

ukzero1

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And yet I've done the opposite. Some years ago, a chap I was fishing next to had problems seeing his pole float bristle (his eyes were just about knackered). I worked for a chap called Dick Clegg making all sorts of floats and the next day at work, I came up with this idea. I made a few as a try-out and handed the chap a couple in different sizes and he was very pleased with them. All I did was add a plastic bead to the bristle, he could have the bristle stand well up, or shot it down to the bead and still see the bite with no problems. I got the go-ahead to put them into production. Sometimes adding instead of taking away can aid people...

Prototype pole float.JPG
 
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