Pole Float Tips

robinta

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I'm sure this is going to sound a bit weird!

Is there a way to tell if a plastic pole float tip is solid or hollow?

With the changing of the weather, I'm wanting to get some solid-tipped float rigs redone.

After my time away from fishing, I can't remember which floats I have are solids and which are hollow.

Some are easy to tell when the float stem goes into the body, but others not so much.

I know the sensitivity question of 'solid vs hollow - does it make a difference' has been done to death, and I don't particularly want to reopen that debate, but wondering if there's something obvious I'm missing 🙂
 

ukzero1

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Why go for solid tips?
Anyway, hollow tips are more translucent which means light makes them more visible than a solid, also, a hollow tip will bend easier.
 

robinta

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Why go for solid tips?
Anyway, hollow tips are more translucent which means light makes them more visible than a solid, also, a hollow tip will bend easier.
This is what I was afraid of 😎

I believe that for any given diameter, the solid tip will be easier for the fish to pull under, with less force... Magnifying bites.

In the past, I thought all diameter tips would behave the same irrespective of tip material, but I've seen videos proving this isn't the case.

Therefore, I'm keen to maximise my sensitivity for rigs over the coming months.

Probably very introspective and farty I know, but as I already have the products I'm keen to find out 🙂
 

ukzero1

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@robinta

O.K. Personally, I don't think that a solid tip will be any more sensitive than a hollow one because you don't know the size of the fish that's on the other end, you could have a little experiment though. Get 2 pole floats the same body shape and same shotting, put a solid in one and a hollow in the other and see how each reacts. The hollow one will be easier to see because it's translucent, therefore, giving you a better bite indication by sight.
 
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Freesolo82

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Plastic and fibre are much less buoyant than hollow tips and it makes a massive difference when fishing for small fish like roach.
 

Dave

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I watched an interesting Guru video on this yesterday and they maintained that hollow tips allowed light through them and as such it made them easier to see than solid tips therefore you could get away with thinner tips and dotting them down more.
Amongst the floatmakers there's a belief that it's not the buoyancy of the material but the displacement that matters most. Therefore a thinner tip that you can see is better than a fatter tip so you can see it.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Purely a guess but I think that generally if the tip is less than 1.1mm thick it will be solid. Trying to manufacture a hollow tip of less than 1.1mm while not impossible would be tricky plus at that thickness the void would be so small as to make the difference in performance negligible.

For Winter commercials I use a 1.2mm hollow tip, on the canal a 0.7 solid.
 

Ken the Pacman

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Most cases the solid nylon tips will bend and the hollow are stiffer and dont bend same as cane although there are very few cane bristles now but cane or nylon tips are generally thinner anyway unless its a fairly chunky float like a margin float.
You can shot a cane bristle or a hollow bristle down to a dot but nylon or fibre is more difficult to get the same effect.
 

robinta

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I always used to believe the buoyancy of a bristle was taken into consideration in the overall shorting of the float, and the water displaced by the diameter of the tip made the only difference.

However, after watching this video by gaz malman (malman floats), the tip material makes a visible difference

See attached

 

Maesknoll

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Most cases the solid nylon tips will bend and the hollow are stiffer and dont bend same as cane although there are very few cane bristles now but cane or nylon tips are generally thinner anyway unless its a fairly chunky float like a margin float.
You can shot a cane bristle or a hollow bristle down to a dot but nylon or fibre is more difficult to get the same effect.
Bristle grease is a godsend when dottng down solid bristles.

I’ve still got continental flaots where the wire goes right through and is the bristle and stem, very sensitive, but I haven’t used them for years.
 

Nobby_nobbs

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Drennan did an article on this subject a few years ago. I’ve just had a look on their website but couldn’t find it but you could try to get a copy through bookface.
How sensitive a float tip is as Dave said is displacement however; displacement is a function of mass and volume (material density).
Generally speaking a solid tip will show bites up better than a hollow tip.
 

tipitinmick

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Bristle grease is a godsend when dottng down solid bristles.

I’ve still got continental flaots where the wire goes right through and is the bristle and stem, very sensitive, but I haven’t used them for years.
Can I ask .... How long have you had your bristle grease ? Think I’ve had mine 15 years +. Seems to last forever.

Those wire all the way through floats you have make excellent worm and joker floats. 👍
 

Ken the Pacman

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Before some bright spark thought of coloured bristle grease we used Vaseline on really fine wire or nylon tips which works just as well for a fraction of the price and its also good for making line float.
 

MarkW

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Just watched the video which is a similar test to the old hinged wood test that Walter Bower used on his Newark Needle floats but as was pointed out at the time fish don't bite by hitting the top of the float with a piece of wood. Sadly his physics knowledge is poor, certainly not enough to describe what is actually happening.

Some facts:
If you make two identical (in dimensions) floats bar the fact one has a hollow tip, the other a solid tip, the float with a solid tip will weigh more than the one with a hollow tip, and therefore the shot load to set it to show, say, 2mm of tip, will be slightly less than the one with the hollow tip but the overall weight of each rig will be the same.

To get an object moving you have to overcome its inertia. Once it is moving it has momentum.

If you made two floats but used identical tips but greatly varying sized floats the experiment could prove anything you want, ie make a big heavy float with a 2mm hollow tip and compare it with a much smaller float with a solid tip and now the hollow-tipped one will go down further.

I like the hollow tips; I don't make pole floats nor buy that many but I am making/replacing some of my existing wagglers/crowquill Avons with hollow-tipped versions simply because they are so much more visible, at least when a bright tip is required.
 

Maesknoll

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Can I ask .... How long have you had your bristle grease ? Think I’ve had mine 15 years +. Seems to last forever.

Those wire all the way through floats you have make excellent worm and joker floats. 👍
I reckon I bought it when I came back from my break in fishing so 2007/2008, I guess if I hadn’t have had a break and sold all my kit, I would still have some original from the 80’s......

Yep, that’s what I used those floats for, haven’t fished with B&J for a few years now.
 

TrickyD

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Was it Drennan that produced hollow tip floats with slits in the tips, which was supposed to reduce resistance?
 

Nobby_nobbs

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Think I still have some Desque Eric’s kicking about somewhere from my bloodworm fishing days on the canal circuit.
 

Nicky Dodds

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Was it Drennan that produced hollow tip floats with slits in the tips, which was supposed to reduce resistance?
The ones with the scoop cut out of the side so that as the tip submerged it filled with water thereby decreasing displacement but allowing the use of a wider hollow tip and increased visibility.
 
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