Pointing feeder rod straight out

Godber

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You create the angle from rod tip to feeder by pointing the rod tip down quite steeply in front of you. It causes less stress on your neck and its easier to keep tabs on who's catching both sides of you. Good when using short 8-9)ft rods and a keepnet as your rest. Not a river method though and l would only use it when using method feeder. Silvers l still prefer to create the angle out to the left hand side of me.
 

Lee Richards

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It does go against convention Mick but there are quite a few Lower Severn Barbel/Carp anglers that do actually fish that way now and especially when fishing on the near margin shelf.
Did it myself a few weeks ago and was fishing no more than four rods lengths out.
The trick to making it work is to have the rod point downstream so the line is not cutting across the flow,you can actually use far less weight than you would imagine.
 

Godber

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It does go against convention Mick but there are quite a few Lower Severn Barbel/Carp anglers that do actually fish that way now and especially when fishing on the near margin shelf.
Did it myself a few weeks ago and was fishing no more than four rods lengths out.
The trick to making it work is to have the rod point downstream so the line is not cutting across the flow,you can actually use far less weight than you would imagine.
Right! Interesting Lee. In my mind its rod tip high to prevent weed etc snarling up your line but as you say, for the near shelf a low tip makes sense. Never stop learning in this game👍
 

davej1981

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I thought on one video it was said that it reduces the chance of moving the feeder. A tommy pickering video said hes seen people do it and he doesn’t think its right as when you pick up on a bite it causes a slack in the line which could result in a lost fish, so he always has his rod in the traditional ional position. Tommys opinion makes more sense to me
 

Lee Richards

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Not sure how it can cause slack in the line as you are lifting the rod up and unless the fish is moving towards you the law of physics means you are pulling the feeder towards you and adding tension. The same would happen fishing the conventional way.
I get that the fish pulling the tip round can help set the hook but that would be the same if the fish was pulling the line off a correctly set baitrunner/clutch.
Get it right and the weight of the method should be helping to set the hook anyway.
 

Swim Jim

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Fish this method a lot in conjunction with a correctly set bait runner, straighter the better. It stops the rod being dragged in by violent takes.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Not sure how it can cause slack in the line as you are lifting the rod up and unless the fish is moving towards you the law of physics means you are pulling the feeder towards you and adding tension. The same would happen fishing the conventional way.
I get that the fish pulling the tip round can help set the hook but that would be the same if the fish was pulling the line off a correctly set baitrunner/clutch.
Get it right and the weight of the method should be helping to set the hook anyway.

The slack could be caused by creating a bow in the line as you pick the rod up. The resistance of the water on the submerged line means the line will not remain straight and tight as the rod tip is moved upwards or sideways. The normal angled rod position means that when picking the rod up the tip applies pressure along the line and not at an angle thus no, or very little, bow is formed.

A theoretical explanation but logical to me.
 

Silverfisher

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I’ve always been a tip pointed up feeder angler, never done the whole lay low off to one side approach. I guess it came from only starting to feeder fish a good 10 years into my angling journey. Before all my “tip” fishing if you like was sea fishing from boats where your tip is obviously in the air so when I started feeder fishing it just made sense to me to do a similar thing just with the tip obviously not quite so high. Seems to work perfectly well for me. Ironically the only time I’ve ever done any tip fishing with the rod laid low is also see fishing when scrabbling around docks and stuff although you are feeling for bites then as much as looking for them.
 

davej1981

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The slack could be caused by creating a bow in the line as you pick the rod up. The resistance of the water on the submerged line means the line will not remain straight and tight as the rod tip is moved upwards or sideways. The normal angled rod position means that when picking the rod up the tip applies pressure along the line and not at an angle thus no, or very little, bow is formed.

A theoretical explanation but logical to me.
This is basically what tommy pickering says in the video. Makes sense to me too. I would like to point out though that feeder/method fishing is not my area of expertise 😂😂
 

Dave

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There is that point re slack in the line - if the rod is pointing straight out, you get a take/bite, you lift the rod from pointing down the line to towards the sky, the arc the rod tip is going to go through will create a 'flat spot' so to speak

I've even done a little diagram ;)

1602054144079.png
 

Dave

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Not if up against an island or far bank as the fish can only go sideways or towards you keeping the flat spot the same or increasing it, likewise there is no saying which way a fish would go in open water
 

Tinca Steve

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But with a free running weight then the line would still be taught, don't matter which way it swam.
 

Dave

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Technically yes, but only practically if you have a heavy enough weight for it to remain in place - the greater the angler of line through the weight to the hook the heavier the weight needs to be to prevent movement.
And if you use too heavy a weight you will end up striking against the weight rather than the fish, hence the recent revival with paternoster type rigs and use of booms

.... I feel another sketch coming on :)
 

squimp

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Surely the issue is actually registering a bite, rather than what happens when you lift the rod.

Thinking about the size of your weight etc etc is just going to confuse the situation.

Practically speaking Once a bite has been registered, the line beyond the rod tip is tight - so where the rod goes from there is pretty irrelevant. It pulls the line and that is it.

maybe you should check out the convoluted arguments over where the rod actually goes during a fly fishing cast. Basically even with slo Mo video people don’t really understand - so us mere coarse fishers are probably best not worrying about it......
 

rudd

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There is that point re slack in the line - if the rod is pointing straight out, you get a take/bite, you lift the rod from pointing down the line to towards the sky, the arc the rod tip is going to go through will create a 'flat spot' so to speak

I've even done a little diagram ;)

View attachment 84711
Reel when lifting.😉
 

BarryS

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I've seen a few anglers do this now when method fishing - cast out, tighten up, and lay the rod on the rest pointing straight out down the line rather than being at an angle to it.

I've used this style before when the bankside vegetation had been high, or when the swim is tight, but you don't get any bite indication as such other than the rod being pulled on the rest, or the drag slipping. Unless you fish a slack line to the tip and watch that for indications perhaps.

What is the reasoning for it and does it work?
Up in the air is ok as you say beachcaster style as the rod will still absorb the initial take......Or straight out with a baitrunner......and or a electronic indicator.
At an angle with a slight bend seems to be best and most traditional option as you do need the rod to go round
 
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