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wozza56

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Sep 1, 2010
Messages
16
Firstly i would like to say hi ,my names warren and i live in somerset and i am getting into fishing after my 8 year old had a few lessons at school and then got me to take him to the local canal .I used to do a bit of fishing when i was younger but i havent done any for over 30 years so i have a few questions
Could someone please explain all the different rods and obviously types of fishing ? when i used to go you chucked a bit of bread on your hook with a float and caught whatever you could but now there are wagglers carping bait runners and all sorts .
I would also like some advice on some gear to buy for just general float fishing ,not too dear but not your bargain basement stuff (unless some of it has proved reliable )
thanks for now and hopefully be talking to you all soon
 

cyril

El blanko
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
1,263
[:D][:D] hello an welcome mate , you best bet would be to go to your local tackle shop, tell them what you are after and the amount you are looking to spend[:T]
 

DevonDangler

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Apr 29, 2009
Messages
1,246
Welcome Warren,quite a few of them cider drinking zummerzet boys on here so you should feel right at home[:D]

Agree with Cyrils advice,pop in to your local tackle shop and have a good look around and ask lots of questions.Any tackle dealer should be glad to help and advise you. Don`t buy bargain basement gear cos if you really get `bitten by the bug` you will regret not getting better quality gear!

John
 

PorkRocker

Regular member
Joined
Mar 31, 2005
Messages
313
Hi mate -

From what you've said it seems like you are interested in general coarse fishing on lakes, rivers, ponds and canals for the main species of bream, tench, carp, rudd, roach, perch, chub and barbel. There are obviously other species in these waters but these are what most coarse fisherman target.

When I'm fishing I notice that there are 3 types of angler and it just depends what sort of fishing you want to do!

There are anglers who fish in matches and have gear suited to catching fish quickly and having things close to hand, expensive poles made of carbon and big seatboxes with lot's of time saving accessories etc...

There are anglers who target specimen fish such as big carp and you will see that they have much more heavy duty gear, tents, big landing nets and bite alarms and a big chair to sit on - they normally wear camo gear lol.

There are also other anglers who I would class as just general pleasure coarse anglers fishing for what ever they can catch, using a mixture of rods which aren't usually heavy duty like specimen anglers, maybe a pole and also a seatbox or chair. I assume that this is the sort of fishing you want to do, where you catch a variety of species and aren't too bothered about what you catch!

Obviously certain venues attract a certain type of fisherman, ie some venues are obviously fished to catch big carp or big pike and other venues are more match orientated and are fished by matchmen and the general course angler a like.

For general coarse fishing there are several methods that are used to target the main coarse species and these are: -

Waggler/float fishing - this requires a rod and reel and a float and can catch all species of fish. A decent waggler rod will set you back around 30, obviously the more you spend the better they get, although not always. You can definitely get an ok rod for 30, althought I wouldnt advise spending much less than this. A decent reel can be had for around the same price. Buy the best tackle you can afford! It's best to go to a tackle shop and ask the assistant for help who will then direct you to the rods and reels in your price bracket.

Legering - This requires the use of a bomb or feeder and bites are indicated by watching the end of the tip. Again the rod for this is different to waggler fishing and it is advised that you have both waggler and leger rod for different occasions. Legering is better in deeper water and for hitting areas you couldn't reach with a waggler. Again a decent leger rod can be bought for around 30+ and they normally come with different weighted tips for different conditions and for handling different sized bombs/feeders. The reel you get can be used for both waggler fishing and legering at first, but you might want to buy 2 different reels eventually as some reels are better suited for wagglering or legering. Google legering rigs for examples of how to setup a feeder or bomb on the leger rod.

Pole/whip - This is a big piece of carbon upto 16m long, which has elastic coming out of the end of it to take the strain of the fish's fight. There is no reel attached to it, hence the need for the elastic. This requires that you attach a rig to the end of it. Rigs contain the float, line, hook and shot and can be quickly attached to start fishined immediately. The presentation on the pole is the most beneficial thing as you can keep the float still and you can accurately reach features with it that you might find hard to with a reel and rod setup. The prices for poles are expensive. You can get a small pole or whip for around the 50 mark, which should be ok for fishing a few metres out. However, if you want to fish at 6 metres or more then the quality of the pole will affect how it handles and then poles start to become expensive. I would say that a decent pole can be had for 300 which will be fishable upto 13 metres. Obviously the more you spend the better they get, generally.

These 3 methods I've mentioned will catch all types of fish and you need to make your rigs according to the fish you expect to catch. If you are targeting carp for example and know there is an abundance of carp in the water you are fishing, you need to tackle up appropriately and get bigger hooks and stronger lines. Same goes if you are fishing for smaller fish using smaller baits like maggots or casters, smaller hooks and thinner lines often work better.

Theres absolute tonnes of information to tell you and I'd be here all week - I advise you watch some youtube clips on the methods ive mentioned above and possibly buy a book to read. Go to your tackle shop and explain your situation and im sure theyll be glad to help.
 

Neil ofthe nene

Doing things differently.
Site Supporter
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22,632
Hi and welcome, and no, no question is daft if you don't know the answer so ask away.

For general coarse fishing without getting into the specialist areas I would suggest having a look at Bennets of Sheffield - bosfish.co.uk They do starter kits that should give you everything you need like this one http://www.bosfish.co.uk/PRODUCTS/outfits/be156coarse.htm.

Just to clarify a couple of things you mention. Waggler, a float that is fixed to the line by the bottom end only (they "waggle" in the air when cast). Ideal float for casting a distance accurately such as towards the far side of a canal/river or out into a lake. Bait Runner is a reel that has a free spool facility. The idea baing that the spool will revolve without the handle turning and thus allowing species like carp to take line before you are able to strike. The free spool facility is switched on/off by means of a lever or off when you start to turn the reel handle. Trust me you will not need one on most canals.

Best bet is to take a walk along the canal and have a chat with some anglers on the bank who will show you what they are using and doing. They will probably be fishing the pole but you can get on OK using a rod and line - until the pole bug bites.
 

parcan31

Born again md'er
Joined
Feb 17, 2008
Messages
689
Originally posted by PorkRocker

Hi mate -

From what you've said it seems like you are interested in general coarse fishing on lakes, rivers, ponds and canals for the main species of bream, tench, carp, rudd, roach, perch, chub and barbel. There are obviously other species in these waters but these are what most coarse fisherman target.

When I'm fishing I notice that there are 3 types of angler and it just depends what sort of fishing you want to do!

There are anglers who fish in matches and have gear suited to catching fish quickly and having things close to hand, expensive poles made of carbon and big seatboxes with lot's of time saving accessories etc...

There are anglers who target specimen fish such as big carp and you will see that they have much more heavy duty gear, tents, big landing nets and bite alarms and a big chair to sit on - they normally wear camo gear lol.

There are also other anglers who I would class as just general pleasure coarse anglers fishing for what ever they can catch, using a mixture of rods which aren't usually heavy duty like specimen anglers, maybe a pole and also a seatbox or chair. I assume that this is the sort of fishing you want to do, where you catch a variety of species and aren't too bothered about what you catch!

Obviously certain venues attract a certain type of fisherman, ie some venues are obviously fished to catch big carp or big pike and other venues are more match orientated and are fished by matchmen and the general course angler a like.

For general coarse fishing there are several methods that are used to target the main coarse species and these are: -

Waggler/float fishing - this requires a rod and reel and a float and can catch all species of fish. A decent waggler rod will set you back around 30, obviously the more you spend the better they get, although not always. You can definitely get an ok rod for 30, althought I wouldnt advise spending much less than this. A decent reel can be had for around the same price. Buy the best tackle you can afford! It's best to go to a tackle shop and ask the assistant for help who will then direct you to the rods and reels in your price bracket.

Legering - This requires the use of a bomb or feeder and bites are indicated by watching the end of the tip. Again the rod for this is different to waggler fishing and it is advised that you have both waggler and leger rod for different occasions. Legering is better in deeper water and for hitting areas you couldn't reach with a waggler. Again a decent leger rod can be bought for around 30+ and they normally come with different weighted tips for different conditions and for handling different sized bombs/feeders. The reel you get can be used for both waggler fishing and legering at first, but you might want to buy 2 different reels eventually as some reels are better suited for wagglering or legering. Google legering rigs for examples of how to setup a feeder or bomb on the leger rod.

Pole/whip - This is a big piece of carbon upto 16m long, which has elastic coming out of the end of it to take the strain of the fish's fight. There is no reel attached to it, hence the need for the elastic. This requires that you attach a rig to the end of it. Rigs contain the float, line, hook and shot and can be quickly attached to start fishined immediately. The presentation on the pole is the most beneficial thing as you can keep the float still and you can accurately reach features with it that you might find hard to with a reel and rod setup. The prices for poles are expensive. You can get a small pole or whip for around the 50 mark, which should be ok for fishing a few metres out. However, if you want to fish at 6 metres or more then the quality of the pole will affect how it handles and then poles start to become expensive. I would say that a decent pole can be had for 300 which will be fishable upto 13 metres. Obviously the more you spend the better they get, generally.

These 3 methods I've mentioned will catch all types of fish and you need to make your rigs according to the fish you expect to catch. If you are targeting carp for example and know there is an abundance of carp in the water you are fishing, you need to tackle up appropriately and get bigger hooks and stronger lines. Same goes if you are fishing for smaller fish using smaller baits like maggots or casters, smaller hooks and thinner lines often work better.

Theres absolute tonnes of information to tell you and I'd be here all week - I advise you watch some youtube clips on the methods ive mentioned above and possibly buy a book to read. Go to your tackle shop and explain your situation and im sure theyll be glad to help.
Grest post[:T]
 

Geoff P

The MOGerator
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 2, 2001
Messages
15,937
Mark

He thought you needed help also [:p][:D]
 

wozza56

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Messages
16
Wow!!! Thanks for the great replies ,it is definatley just fun float fishing i want to do so i will pop down and see the local tackle man and see what he has
Thanks again and i will let you know how i get on
 

Col7777

Regular member
Joined
Jul 28, 2008
Messages
4,976
Also get yourself and your son a rod license, if an EA bailiff comes along the canal and you haven't got one it could be a heavy fine.
 

bluemack

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Messages
3,842
Originally posted by parcan31

Originally posted by PorkRocker

Hi mate -

From what you've said it seems like you are interested in general coarse fishing on lakes, rivers, ponds and canals for the main species of bream, tench, carp, rudd, roach, perch, chub and barbel. There are obviously other species in these waters but these are what most coarse fisherman target.

When I'm fishing I notice that there are 3 types of angler and it just depends what sort of fishing you want to do!

There are anglers who fish in matches and have gear suited to catching fish quickly and having things close to hand, expensive poles made of carbon and big seatboxes with lot's of time saving accessories etc...

There are anglers who target specimen fish such as big carp and you will see that they have much more heavy duty gear, tents, big landing nets and bite alarms and a big chair to sit on - they normally wear camo gear lol.

There are also other anglers who I would class as just general pleasure coarse anglers fishing for what ever they can catch, using a mixture of rods which aren't usually heavy duty like specimen anglers, maybe a pole and also a seatbox or chair. I assume that this is the sort of fishing you want to do, where you catch a variety of species and aren't too bothered about what you catch!

Obviously certain venues attract a certain type of fisherman, ie some venues are obviously fished to catch big carp or big pike and other venues are more match orientated and are fished by matchmen and the general course angler a like.

For general coarse fishing there are several methods that are used to target the main coarse species and these are: -

Waggler/float fishing - this requires a rod and reel and a float and can catch all species of fish. A decent waggler rod will set you back around 30, obviously the more you spend the better they get, although not always. You can definitely get an ok rod for 30, althought I wouldnt advise spending much less than this. A decent reel can be had for around the same price. Buy the best tackle you can afford! It's best to go to a tackle shop and ask the assistant for help who will then direct you to the rods and reels in your price bracket.

Legering - This requires the use of a bomb or feeder and bites are indicated by watching the end of the tip. Again the rod for this is different to waggler fishing and it is advised that you have both waggler and leger rod for different occasions. Legering is better in deeper water and for hitting areas you couldn't reach with a waggler. Again a decent leger rod can be bought for around 30+ and they normally come with different weighted tips for different conditions and for handling different sized bombs/feeders. The reel you get can be used for both waggler fishing and legering at first, but you might want to buy 2 different reels eventually as some reels are better suited for wagglering or legering. Google legering rigs for examples of how to setup a feeder or bomb on the leger rod.

Pole/whip - This is a big piece of carbon upto 16m long, which has elastic coming out of the end of it to take the strain of the fish's fight. There is no reel attached to it, hence the need for the elastic. This requires that you attach a rig to the end of it. Rigs contain the float, line, hook and shot and can be quickly attached to start fishined immediately. The presentation on the pole is the most beneficial thing as you can keep the float still and you can accurately reach features with it that you might find hard to with a reel and rod setup. The prices for poles are expensive. You can get a small pole or whip for around the 50 mark, which should be ok for fishing a few metres out. However, if you want to fish at 6 metres or more then the quality of the pole will affect how it handles and then poles start to become expensive. I would say that a decent pole can be had for 300 which will be fishable upto 13 metres. Obviously the more you spend the better they get, generally.

These 3 methods I've mentioned will catch all types of fish and you need to make your rigs according to the fish you expect to catch. If you are targeting carp for example and know there is an abundance of carp in the water you are fishing, you need to tackle up appropriately and get bigger hooks and stronger lines. Same goes if you are fishing for smaller fish using smaller baits like maggots or casters, smaller hooks and thinner lines often work better.

Theres absolute tonnes of information to tell you and I'd be here all week - I advise you watch some youtube clips on the methods ive mentioned above and possibly buy a book to read. Go to your tackle shop and explain your situation and im sure theyll be glad to help.
Grest post[:T]
i was going to say the same thing,excellent porky.[:T]
 

HarryOatcake

02/02/04 -24/12/17
Site Supporter
In Memoriam
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
15,160
Hi', Wozza, and welcome to the site,
as a beginner in your case I don't think you could go far wrong
with a Shakespeare 12ft. float rod,
a reputable inexpensive make being going for years,
and for the little fellow possibly a telescopic rod about 11ft. easy setup
and ideal for when ending a session to leave complete for next trip.

Ideal for canal fishing if this would be your preference
at least your outlay would be very modest if your son decided he did not
want to continue especialy in those cold bleak winter months.

The time for the better stuff would be in the near future if you both decided that you wanted to take things more seriously
whereby skill and experience had improved satisfactorily. [:T]

Harry.
 

castaline

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
1,235
Originally posted by wozza56

Wow!!! Thanks for the great replies ,it is definatley just fun float fishing i want to do so i will pop down and see the local tackle man and see what he has
Thanks again and i will let you know how i get on

Welcome to the forum Wozza; by all means visit your local tackle dealer, but as one who knows to his considerable cost the perils that await there, beware the dark sorcery practised within their portals.

" A fool and his money are soon parted " is an oft quoted maxim, and the same can be said of fishermen. ( Whether all fishermen are fools, or all fools are fishermen is a semantic point you may ponder later as you gaze at your empty wallet).

If your local tackle shop is of the modern self-service type, the danger is less. Clutching your basket you will traverse the aisles selecting the required items, and thence to the checkout. There a callow youth will tot up your purchases and pronounce the total. No enquiry as to where you intend to fish or which species you intend to persue will be made. He is not interested, he simply wants your money. You will leave there without spending much money, but no more spiritually uplifted than if you had gone round Tescos and bought a loaf and a pint of milk.

The more traditional tackle shop however, is a different experience altogether. Upon entering, you will no doubt be greeted by the owner as if you were a cherished friend. This man is always an experienced angler, and an acknowledged expert on local venues and methods. At any time of the day there will be a row of seatboxes in front of the counter, upon which will be perched several of the local 'elders' discussing tackle and tactics. The atmosphere will be one of bonhomie and good fellowship. Have no fear of embarrassment; simply explain your situation to the owner, and leave yourself in his capable hands. Rods will be taken down from racks for you to try, reels will be produced from boxes and the intricacies of gear ratios, line lay and fighting drag will be carefully explained. However, this is where the sorcery takes place. You may notice that like Las Vegas casinos, there are no clocks, and for the same reason; the passage of time becomes imperceptible. Further advice
will be offered on line, floats, shots, hooks, nets, and a hundred other items that you will convince yourself that you need.
Unless you have the iron self-discipline of a Gurkha, you will find yourself leaving the shop at closing time, bidding your new-found friends farewell, clutching several carrier bags containing your new purchases, and realising that you have just spent this month's mortgage money on your new pastime. It will be dark, and about now you will remember that you promised to pick your wife up an hour ago.

A man who visits a fishing tackle shop during the summer months is less prone to such profligacy. Such a man visits the shop because he is going fishing, and business is concluded in a swift and efficient manner. He will purchase the two or three items he needs, two or three more he does not, and away he goes. However, during the cold winter months when rivers are flooded and lakes are frozen, he visits the shop because he is not going fishing. He is not in need of tackle and bait, he is in need of mental sustenance and like-minded companionship. He will greet the 'elders', accept a cup of coffee from the owner, and take his place on an empty seatbox to chew the fat. Congratulations will be offered on his season's successes, and commiserations on his failures. And if the man should repay this hospitality by buying yet more tackle, who can blame him? Cheaper than time spent on a psychiatrist's couch, and just as therapautic.

Happily, solace may also be found here on Maggotdrowners. The spirit is also one of bonhomie and good fellowship, we have our own 'elders' who are happy to dispense advice and encouragement, and it won't empty your wallet.

Good luck, cheers! Castaline.
 

HarryOatcake

02/02/04 -24/12/17
Site Supporter
In Memoriam
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
15,160
A good post Castaline but none of the aforementioned Temples of
Bonhomie or Knowledge in my area. [:(] [:D]

Harry.
 

motocrossboy7

Regular member
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
455
hi mate i dont think i would do u any harm to pop down to where your gonna fish an just have a nosey an a chat with the other ppl on the bank just ask what method there using an get them to show u a set up. personally i think seein is better than bein told

jonny
 

wozza56

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Messages
16
Thanks again for the replies,i have been down to the canal with my son the other day as he was given a small retractable rod set up when he finished his club at school (nothing to do with the school the chap did it off his own back which i thought was nice)and i have bought a rod licence but turned out i didnt need it for the boy as he's only 8 .When i was at the canal i could only find one other person fishing and he was doing the same with his son .It seems to me that around these parts they are more interested in the carp angler as i have a place half a mile from me called Burton springs and i have had a chat with the owner who didnt mind us going there but you could tell that he didnt really want you there unless you were after big carp .
Castaline ,this is what worries me going to a tackle shop as at the end of the day they want to sell you stuff regardless and this was the reason i was asking on here if anyone could recommend a set up to be starting with
I have got a few bits like nets and a seatbox (used for sea fishing)so i only need to buy a rod and reel at the moment and a few bits of tackle .I have noticed it seems to be a lot cheaper on line but without knowing the sort of rod and reel to go for i dont know what prices i should be paying so any help would be appreciated and then i might even be able to haggle at the tackle shop
thanks again
 

wozza56

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Messages
16
Would this sort of thing be ok ?
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DAIWA-SWEEPFIRE-MATCH-ROD-13FT-RRP-39-99-/170527671448?pt=UK_SportingGoods_Fishing_FishingRods_EH&hash=item27b43dc498
 

motocrossboy7

Regular member
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
455
if u go to your local newagents an buy, improve your coarse fishing or one of them types of magazines in the back there are always deals like starter sets an such either get on of them or just look to see what it consists of an that should give u a good heads up

jonny
 

grayggr

Active member
Joined
Aug 1, 2010
Messages
92
Originally posted by castaline

Originally posted by wozza56

Wow!!! Thanks for the great replies ,it is definatley just fun float fishing i want to do so i will pop down and see the local tackle man and see what he has
Thanks again and i will let you know how i get on

Welcome to the forum Wozza; by all means visit your local tackle dealer, but as one who knows to his considerable cost the perils that await there, beware the dark sorcery practised within their portals.

" A fool and his money are soon parted " is an oft quoted maxim, and the same can be said of fishermen. ( Whether all fishermen are fools, or all fools are fishermen is a semantic point you may ponder later as you gaze at your empty wallet).

If your local tackle shop is of the modern self-service type, the danger is less. Clutching your basket you will traverse the aisles selecting the required items, and thence to the checkout. There a callow youth will tot up your purchases and pronounce the total. No enquiry as to where you intend to fish or which species you intend to persue will be made. He is not interested, he simply wants your money. You will leave there without spending much money, but no more spiritually uplifted than if you had gone round Tescos and bought a loaf and a pint of milk.

The more traditional tackle shop however, is a different experience altogether. Upon entering, you will no doubt be greeted by the owner as if you were a cherished friend. This man is always an experienced angler, and an acknowledged expert on local venues and methods. At any time of the day there will be a row of seatboxes in front of the counter, upon which will be perched several of the local 'elders' discussing tackle and tactics. The atmosphere will be one of bonhomie and good fellowship. Have no fear of embarrassment; simply explain your situation to the owner, and leave yourself in his capable hands. Rods will be taken down from racks for you to try, reels will be produced from boxes and the intricacies of gear ratios, line lay and fighting drag will be carefully explained. However, this is where the sorcery takes place. You may notice that like Las Vegas casinos, there are no clocks, and for the same reason; the passage of time becomes imperceptible. Further advice
will be offered on line, floats, shots, hooks, nets, and a hundred other items that you will convince yourself that you need.
Unless you have the iron self-discipline of a Gurkha, you will find yourself leaving the shop at closing time, bidding your new-found friends farewell, clutching several carrier bags containing your new purchases, and realising that you have just spent this month's mortgage money on your new pastime. It will be dark, and about now you will remember that you promised to pick your wife up an hour ago.

A man who visits a fishing tackle shop during the summer months is less prone to such profligacy. Such a man visits the shop because he is going fishing, and business is concluded in a swift and efficient manner. He will purchase the two or three items he needs, two or three more he does not, and away he goes. However, during the cold winter months when rivers are flooded and lakes are frozen, he visits the shop because he is not going fishing. He is not in need of tackle and bait, he is in need of mental sustenance and like-minded companionship. He will greet the 'elders', accept a cup of coffee from the owner, and take his place on an empty seatbox to chew the fat. Congratulations will be offered on his season's successes, and commiserations on his failures. And if the man should repay this hospitality by buying yet more tackle, who can blame him? Cheaper than time spent on a psychiatrist's couch, and just as therapautic.

Happily, solace may also be found here on Maggotdrowners. The spirit is also one of bonhomie and good fellowship, we have our own 'elders' who are happy to dispense advice and encouragement, and it won't empty your wallet.

Good luck, cheers! Castaline.

Fantastic, this is EXACTLY what happens in my local tackle shops, although I'm not often invited onto the seatboxes for a brew, which upsets me. Greatly.
 

Sir_fishalot

Active member
Joined
Jun 9, 2010
Messages
51
This would be a good starting point for a float fishing set up.

Omni X Shakespeare Float Rod 12ft Approx 19.99
NEW DAIWA Sweepfire X Reel Approx 14.99
Maxima Chameleon Line 100m 4lb 3.50 and use electrical tape to back the spool.
Drennan crystal floats approx 99 pence each
Drennan or middy hooks to nylon approx 2 lb strain 1.99 for 10. Size 18 for maggot. size 14/16 for meat and corn.
Pack of split Shot in various sizes. approx 4.
Disgorger 50 pence.
Keenets Telescopic Landing Net 9.95 from argos.
Rod rest and bank stick set 14.95 from argos

I have probably missed something. Approximately 100 should get you started with some reasonable gear.
Try to avoid the kits as they are usually dreadfull.
 
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