Pike fishing

Itsdrew93

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Aug 1, 2019
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148
Want to start pike fishing this winter and was thinking of getting the savage gear lure heavy outfit rod and reel combo is savage gear anygood i know nothing about pike fishing any suggestions on what should get but i want something i can catch big pike on and are the rods the same as carp rods with like test curve dont really get the grams thing lol the i want is 20-60g i think will that do or do i need bigger or smaller
 

Chris Calder

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My pike rods are 2 1/2 lb test curve and have an all through action, they feel even soft than 2 1/2 lb not like most modern carp rods which are tip action and quite stiff.
I looked at Savage Gear Heavy Lure Outfit
I can't see any power rating of the rod, it just states tip action to flick a lure out, not helpful information at all.
 

Simon R

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There's two different aspects to pike fishing.

Firstly there's dead or livebait fishing, which generally involves 2 or 3 11-12' rods set up carp style on a rod pod with, usually bobbins and electronic alarms. It's fairly static fishing and the rods will be along the same lines as carp rods but with a slightly more through action and test curves anywhere from 2lb to 3.5lb - the stronger rods necessary if you're gonna be flinging half-a-mackerel to the horizon. I stick to 2lb TC because the waters I fish don't require huge casts or big baits.

The other aspect is lure fishing - or dropshot fishing which is the same thing really and just an attempt by the tackle industry to get you to buy another rod/reel/entire set-up that you don't really need.
Lure fishing is normally far more mobile and the rods are considerably shorter - this helps to impart more movement into the lure.
Spinning rods (as they used to be known) are normally rated by the weight of the lure they're best suited to casting - so 20-60g is at the heavier end of the scale and at the other end you've got rods rated at just 5g.
I've got a couple of spinning rods that I bought years ago whilst on holiday in the states - ones a Shakespeare Sigma, the other a Garcia - both are 6' 6", and I've no idea what the casting weight of either is but both will cast any lure I own as far as I require on the waters I fish and despite bending alarmingly I've never worried they were about to explode with a fish on the end.

Unfortunately the size or weight of the lure has little bearing on the size of the pike you may catch - I've had jacks on huge plugs which they couldn't possibly swallow and one of my biggest lure caught pike was on a little Shakespeare Marble spinner that I was trying to catch perch with. Without knowing the size of the waters you're intending to fish or the size of the fish you're likely to catch it's difficult to advise on the necessary rods but you won't go far wrong with a 2.5lb TC deadbait rod and a lure rod rated to about 30g. One other thing that is vital for lure fishing is use braid - zero stretch and instant indication of a take will mean you'll hit far more bites - 40 to 50lb BS is ample. I use Fireline but only because I bought about a mile of the stuff last time I holidayed in Florida - it's not cheap but lasts forever.

Simon
 

Itsdrew93

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Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
148
My pike rods are 2 1/2 lb test curve and have an all through action, they feel even soft than 2 1/2 lb not like most modern carp rods which are tip action and quite stiff.
I looked at Savage Gear Heavy Lure Outfit
I can't see any power rating of the rod, it just states tip action to flick a lure out, not helpful information at all.
Thank you i dont really understand that but yh thanks anyway lol
 

Itsdrew93

Regular member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
148
There's two different aspects to pike fishing.

Firstly there's dead or livebait fishing, which generally involves 2 or 3 11-12' rods set up carp style on a rod pod with, usually bobbins and electronic alarms. It's fairly static fishing and the rods will be along the same lines as carp rods but with a slightly more through action and test curves anywhere from 2lb to 3.5lb - the stronger rods necessary if you're gonna be flinging half-a-mackerel to the horizon. I stick to 2lb TC because the waters I fish don't require huge casts or big baits.

The other aspect is lure fishing - or dropshot fishing which is the same thing really and just an attempt by the tackle industry to get you to buy another rod/reel/entire set-up that you don't really need.
Lure fishing is normally far more mobile and the rods are considerably shorter - this helps to impart more movement into the lure.
Spinning rods (as they used to be known) are normally rated by the weight of the lure they're best suited to casting - so 20-60g is at the heavier end of the scale and at the other end you've got rods rated at just 5g.
I've got a couple of spinning rods that I bought years ago whilst on holiday in the states - ones a Shakespeare Sigma, the other a Garcia - both are 6' 6", and I've no idea what the casting weight of either is but both will cast any lure I own as far as I require on the waters I fish and despite bending alarmingly I've never worried they were about to explode with a fish on the end.

Unfortunately the size or weight of the lure has little bearing on the size of the pike you may catch - I've had jacks on huge plugs which they couldn't possibly swallow and one of my biggest lure caught pike was on a little Shakespeare Marble spinner that I was trying to catch perch with. Without knowing the size of the waters you're intending to fish or the size of the fish you're likely to catch it's difficult to advise on the necessary rods but you won't go far wrong with a 2.5lb TC deadbait rod and a lure rod rated to about 30g. One other thing that is vital for lure fishing is use braid - zero stretch and instant indication of a take will mean you'll hit far more bites - 40 to 50lb BS is ample. I use Fireline but only because I bought about a mile of the stuff last time I holidayed in Florida - it's not cheap but lasts forever.

Simon
Thank you mate spot on makes sense so if i get the 20-60g that should good for any size pike yh
 

CookieMonster

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Sep 11, 2020
Messages
15
Want to start pike fishing this winter and was thinking of getting the savage gear lure heavy outfit rod and reel combo is savage gear anygood i know nothing about pike fishing any suggestions on what should get but i want something i can catch big pike on and are the rods the same as carp rods with like test curve dont really get the grams thing lol the i want is 20-60g i think will that do or do i need bigger or smaller
Baitcaster or spinning?
 

Lure Finatic

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
6
One of the most overlooked aspects of pike fishing tackle that newcomers to this branch of our sport overlook is the unhooking equipment needed.

Firstly get yourself, although you may have got one already, a decent sized unhooking mat. Then a good set of quality unhooking pliers, forceps are ok if you are using small trebles but most lures will come with hooks that are removed easier with unhooking pliers, Fox or Savage Gear do reasonably priced pairs.
Finally you need a good pair of sidecutters for those occasions, and it does happen, when you need to cut a hook to making unhooking the fish easier, a lost treble hook is pennies compared to getting the Pike back into the water quickly and safely.

Look at RiverPiker videos on YouTube, he’s got a good unhooking tutorial on his page.
Any other advice ask on here, people will be always willing to help.
Word of advice though, this lure fishing game gets addictive 😀
 

juttle

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Oct 28, 2011
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385
The first thing to do if you’re new to piking, even before you wet a line, is to learn how to unhook them. For someone who has never handled a pike, the sight of a huge head and a mouthful of sharp teeth coming up out of the depths is intimidating. Get the right tools for the job first and then spend some time on YouTube learning how to do it. Best of all, go with someone who has experience.
 

Kevin55

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Jul 13, 2020
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And you'll need a wire trace. I'm just getting my old spinning gear sorted out and also going to try fly fishing for them and found that you can now get much lighter and thinner wire
 

62tucker

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Greys prowla forceps or similar long handle forceps are a must.
Buy cheap Buy twice.
pike are very delicate fish. And need treating with the upmost respect. I bought a full greys kit for unhooking and it’s in a roll like a surgeons tools. But when I go piking it’s invaluable and if I have saved 1 pikes life it’s was money well spent.
 

62tucker

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I have a scare on my thumb off a pike from years ago. Sliced straight through like a Stanley blade. Be careful.
Also be careful casting if anyone with you.
A treble hook in the wrong place is not the same as a size 16
 

Fierbois16

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Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
41
I started lure fishing for pike last year and was a bit confused with all the tackle, lures and line combos around big now I think I've found what works for me. Tools. Its already been said but unhooking tackle is essential, I've found you can get away with cheap long curve pliers but good side cutters are worth paying for, some trebles are surprisingly hard to cut.
Braid and trace. I now use 60lb braid and good quality trace, you will get snagged and strong braid has saved me a few lures.
A range of lures. Just when you think you've got the perfect lure you will blank. I like good realistic looking pike lures for clear water, and something bright and noisy for when theres more colour. I use jig heads and spikey shads in areas where its weedy to cut down on snags.
Rod. For me I've been more than happy with the foxrage warrior 15-50g, I've used smaller lures and its sensitive enough to still feel bites and still stuff enough for chucking bigger lures.
Reel. Started off with the daiwa crossfire 2500, cheap n cheerful and worked perfectly, I've just upgraded to a baitcaster which I must admit I have enjoyed and found more accurate to use.
Finally, I've had a lot of hits after I've worked one area with no luck then changed lures. Keep moving, changing and casting you never know what's lurking. If I can catch pike then im sure you will.
Hope this helps
 

Itsdrew93

Regular member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
148
One of the most overlooked aspects of pike fishing tackle that newcomers to this branch of our sport overlook is the unhooking equipment needed.

Firstly get yourself, although you may have got one already, a decent sized unhooking mat. Then a good set of quality unhooking pliers, forceps are ok if you are using small trebles but most lures will come with hooks that are removed easier with unhooking pliers, Fox or Savage Gear do reasonably priced pairs.
Finally you need a good pair of sidecutters for those occasions, and it does happen, when you need to cut a hook to making unhooking the fish easier, a lost treble hook is pennies compared to getting the Pike back into the water quickly and safely.

Look at RiverPiker videos on YouTube, he’s got a good unhooking tutorial on his page.
Any other advice ask on here, people will be always willing to help.
Word of advice though, this lure fishing game gets addictive 😀
Yh thank you
 

Itsdrew93

Regular member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
148
I started lure fishing for pike last year and was a bit confused with all the tackle, lures and line combos around big now I think I've found what works for me. Tools. Its already been said but unhooking tackle is essential, I've found you can get away with cheap long curve pliers but good side cutters are worth paying for, some trebles are surprisingly hard to cut.
Braid and trace. I now use 60lb braid and good quality trace, you will get snagged and strong braid has saved me a few lures.
A range of lures. Just when you think you've got the perfect lure you will blank. I like good realistic looking pike lures for clear water, and something bright and noisy for when theres more colour. I use jig heads and spikey shads in areas where its weedy to cut down on snags.
Rod. For me I've been more than happy with the foxrage warrior 15-50g, I've used smaller lures and its sensitive enough to still feel bites and still stuff enough for chucking bigger lures.
Reel. Started off with the daiwa crossfire 2500, cheap n cheerful and worked perfectly, I've just upgraded to a baitcaster which I must admit I have enjoyed and found more accurate to use.
Finally, I've had a lot of hits after I've worked one area with no luck then changed lures. Keep moving, changing and casting you never know what's lurking. If I can catch pike then im sure you will.
Hope this helps
Thank you appreciate your help and time i went today and caught nothing in wasnt even fishing an hour tho
 

BURNING

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2020
Messages
18
the rod and reel isn't that particularly important, I have a 5-20 gram 8 ft rod and a size 1000 spinning reel, you are doing a LOT of casting over and over and over so going lightweight will make the experience more pleasant

pike are ambushers, they hunt kinda like snakes, they will stick in one spot with their heads sticking out of weeds etc. and wait for prey to swim past their nose and trigger their lateral line senses. they don't tend to wander around much and this means your lure fishing has to cover as much water as possible, you will want to arrive at a location and cast maybe 8 times in various directions and depths and then move on 50m down the bank cuz there arent any pike present if you aint catching within the first few casts (or they just don't like your lure)

what lure you use changes with the water itself so its best to START SMALL and adapt as you learn more about the water and what works. if I were to choose 5-6 lures for a small lure box - 1). 50mm shad 2). size 3 or 5 mepps spinner 3). a curly tail 80mm that you'd use to bounce along the bottom 4). a nice minnow jerkbait 5). a topwater walk the dog lure (with a nice knocking rattle)

right now we are coming into winter, the lure fishing is getting tough but still very enjoyable, the weeds are all disappearing but there is lots of leaves covering the water bed that a bottom lure would get lost in, so you want a mid-water lure I'd say

when January / February rolls around you will want to use that bottom lure as most of the leaves will have disintergrated allowing the lure to work without obstruction and the pike will be right on the bottom

what else, pike can be surprisingly inaccurate when they strike you can sometimes have a pike trying to devour your lure as you'd retrieve and you'd never even know it! use barbless and set your drag very light so you can easily pull line with your hand without much effort cuz these fish are masters at throwing hooks
 

Fierbois16

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Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
41
I went last week, nothing for three hours. Changed lure and relished the same spots on the walk back then got 4 in an hour. Sometimes it can just be simple changes that bring the bites, dont get me wrong I still blank occasionally but keep trying and eventually you will find what works for you. I had two yesterday, 1 small jack and then a fat 80cm specimen so maybe 6-7lbs? Worth the wait
 
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